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Glasperlenspieler

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  1. Upvote
    Glasperlenspieler got a reaction from onerepublic96 in Parts of Application   
    The writing sample is by far the single most important part of your application. Everything else is secondary. Whether the CV, or the personal statement, or your transcript, or your letters of rec are going to matter more is going to vary widely depending on who's reading your application.
    That being said, admissions committees will often decide how closely they're going to read your writing sample based on the quality of your other materials.....
  2. Upvote
    Glasperlenspieler got a reaction from onerepublic96 in 2021 Closed Admissions   
    How's your German? You might find more Germanists interested in this sort of a project than people in English departments. Alternatively, you might look at grad programs in English departments in Germany (typically taught in English) where the profs are more likely to have a solid background in German philosophy/literary history.
  3. Upvote
    Glasperlenspieler reacted to Bronte1985 in My former advisor is not supportive to my plan to apply to PhD programs..   
    I'm glad that was helpful! Another thing I'll say is that one of the most pernicious things about academia is the way it encourages you to identify your self-worth with academic success and how your peers judge you. That's not a good way to lead your life whether or not you're a "success", but keep in mind that being a successful art historian or any kind of academic is a very specific skill. Failing at it does not mean you're not a smart person with a lot to contribute to the world. You are not your work. 
  4. Upvote
    Glasperlenspieler got a reaction from lilting in How necessary is it to have a masters to enter an ivy PhD Program?   
    Many departments provide profiles for their grad students which include their educational background. Yale's Spanish department, for instance, does this: https://span-port.yale.edu/people/graduate-students
    Spend some time looking at departmental webpages and you can get a decide idea of the profile for a typical student.
  5. Upvote
    Glasperlenspieler reacted to kaufdichglücklich in programs suspending admission fall 21   
    I'm sorry but this is terrible advice. There are infinite career paths beyond restaurant server and teacher that would provide significantly more stability than a PhD program. Also academia is chock full of disillusioned queer people. Not sure if it's the paradise you're looking for. 
    And re: your final point... I have attended low/medium ranked and high ranked programs for my graduate education and anyone who says that lower ranked schools are a better experience is lying or delusional. It's the difference between a 15k and 35k stipend. It's the difference between having a fast tracked application to funding opportunities vs not even knowing they exist. It's the difference between having a guaranteed 6 years of funding vs never knowing if you will have to take out a loan to pay your rent or lose your health insurance at the end of the semester. Ok maybe your advisor will be "nicer" at a lower ranked program, but a letter from them won't go as far on the job market or during fellowship season. You certainly have a lot of advice for someone who has never attended an Art History PhD program of any kind. 
  6. Like
    Glasperlenspieler got a reaction from schlum in African-American Literature: which program(s) to apply to? + GRE   
    @WildeThing knows more about this field than I do, so they can correct me if I'm wrong, but I'd also encourage you to take a close look at job placements. I can't speak for African-American Studies departments, but I do know that if, for example, you work in American Studies, there are far fewer jobs in American Studies departments than in English departments, and people with Ph.D.s from English departments will often out-compete people with Ph.D.s from American Studies departments for jobs in English Departments. It's worth checking to see if there's a similar phenomenon in your field.
  7. Upvote
    Glasperlenspieler reacted to jadeisokay in 2021 Applicants   
    @Bopie5 i had to laugh, to outsiders your message would probably seem nihilistic but for those of us in this... unique situation... we call grad life, "everything is literally precarious and a crapshoot but your undergrad doesn't matter" is very sweet and positive and uplifting.
  8. Upvote
    Glasperlenspieler got a reaction from Losebeforeapply in Writing Sample Questions   
    I think it's totally fine to have your argument be for a conditional claim (i.e. I will argue that, given Y, X). No one expects you to be able to give a defense of hedonistic utilitarianism in order to say anything about applied ethics. But I do think it's worth motivating why that conjunction of positions is at all compelling. Why is this ethical question pressing, important, relevant for someone who holds those positions? You don't want to make it seem like you're just randomly choosing these positions. I think it's also worth asking yourself how necessary those background claims really are to your argument. I can see why the normative framework would, but does it really matter whether moral realism is true for your argument? I mean maybe it does, but I think a lot of the literature on topics in applied ethics can work fairly independently from meta-ethical claims.
  9. Upvote
    Glasperlenspieler got a reaction from lilgreenblatt in 2021 Closed Admissions   
    Welcome to academia, the land of disillusion
  10. Upvote
    Glasperlenspieler reacted to AfricanusCrowther in 2021 Application Thread   
    Good to have a collection of public statements, but please, applicants: don’t get your hopes up about any other top programs not listed here. 
  11. Upvote
    Glasperlenspieler reacted to telkanuru in 2021 Application Thread   
    With that many high-quality programs not accepting applicants this year, it's also a good idea to contemplate the fact that others are, and why that might be the case. 
  12. Upvote
    Glasperlenspieler reacted to Doc Sportello in Interdisciplinary PhD   
    I was originally considering some interdisciplinary PhD programs, and honestly might still be, so I can give you the advice I was given by my undergrad professors, since I asked three different professors a bunch of these questions... The gist that I got was that it really depends on the prestige of the school, and how you can spin your dissertation into something that helps you fit into a specific humanities department. But, the name of the degree does carry some weight (ex. having an English PhD looks better to English departments than having an interdisciplinary PhD in which you used skills that you would use in an English PhD). I've also heard from them that sometimes these departments are less cohesive-- if we consider universities as the neoliberal institutions that they are, these sorts of departments are often a money-saving measure. Professors within them might not know each other or communicate with each other as well as professors in a traditional humanities department.
    I would also argue that many humanities programs tend to be fairly interdisciplinary at this point anyway-- you can usually take courses in other humanities departments, and your dissertation can certainly include elements from multiple fields, so long as, say for example, your English PhD dissertation is at least reasonably focused around literary analysis/theory. I was advised into the recent dissertations coming out of different humanities programs as well as Professor interests to see if there are programs where you feel you could explore your interdisciplinary interests while also having a degree that might look more attractive to departments during the hiring process. For me personally, I have been looking into English programs that have strong faculty in using a continental philosophy lens for literary analysis. But of course don't check specifically interdisciplinary programs off your list if it really is where you think you would fit in best and have the most fruitful experience! Hope some of this was helpful
  13. Like
    Glasperlenspieler got a reaction from kirbs005 in Academic Writing Sample?   
    You're better off with one 15-25 page writing sample. Programs want to see that you can produce a strong, extended argument, and they want to know that you can enter the program and hit the ground running, which means writing several 15-25 pages seminar papers at the end of your first semester while managing other responsibilities.
  14. Upvote
    Glasperlenspieler got a reaction from PolPhil in Writing Sample Questions   
    I think it's totally fine to have your argument be for a conditional claim (i.e. I will argue that, given Y, X). No one expects you to be able to give a defense of hedonistic utilitarianism in order to say anything about applied ethics. But I do think it's worth motivating why that conjunction of positions is at all compelling. Why is this ethical question pressing, important, relevant for someone who holds those positions? You don't want to make it seem like you're just randomly choosing these positions. I think it's also worth asking yourself how necessary those background claims really are to your argument. I can see why the normative framework would, but does it really matter whether moral realism is true for your argument? I mean maybe it does, but I think a lot of the literature on topics in applied ethics can work fairly independently from meta-ethical claims.
  15. Like
    Glasperlenspieler got a reaction from meghan_sparkle in Philosophy in an English PhD   
    Depends on what you mean. Certainly you can deeply engage with philosophy in a literature PhD program, take courses focusing on philosophy, discuss philosophers in your dissertation, etc. However, I expect most English and Comparative Literature programs are going to expect you to take significant coursework in literary studies and produce a dissertation that deals significantly with literature or another form of cultural/aesthetic production.
    You can look at the titles of recent dissertations on many departmental websites, and I think it's pretty rare for most programs to find a dissertation that is "primarily" dealing with philosophical texts. 
    It's pretty unlikely you'll find much support for pursuing analytic philosophy in a literature department. You will certainly find support in many departments to pursue studies in continental philosophy (I hate that distinction, but that's a different can of worms). But if you want to "primarily" focus on philosophy, why would you want to be in a literature department?
  16. Upvote
    Glasperlenspieler got a reaction from Marcus_Aurelius in Writing Sample Questions   
    I think it's totally fine to have your argument be for a conditional claim (i.e. I will argue that, given Y, X). No one expects you to be able to give a defense of hedonistic utilitarianism in order to say anything about applied ethics. But I do think it's worth motivating why that conjunction of positions is at all compelling. Why is this ethical question pressing, important, relevant for someone who holds those positions? You don't want to make it seem like you're just randomly choosing these positions. I think it's also worth asking yourself how necessary those background claims really are to your argument. I can see why the normative framework would, but does it really matter whether moral realism is true for your argument? I mean maybe it does, but I think a lot of the literature on topics in applied ethics can work fairly independently from meta-ethical claims.
  17. Like
    Glasperlenspieler got a reaction from Indecisive Poet in 2021 Closed Admissions   
    But if they defended this summer, that would mean they probably got hired during last years job market (or left academia). There was actually a job market this past year, but I'm not sure there will be one to speak of this year.
  18. Upvote
    Glasperlenspieler got a reaction from polemicist in Writing Sample Questions   
    I think it's totally fine to have your argument be for a conditional claim (i.e. I will argue that, given Y, X). No one expects you to be able to give a defense of hedonistic utilitarianism in order to say anything about applied ethics. But I do think it's worth motivating why that conjunction of positions is at all compelling. Why is this ethical question pressing, important, relevant for someone who holds those positions? You don't want to make it seem like you're just randomly choosing these positions. I think it's also worth asking yourself how necessary those background claims really are to your argument. I can see why the normative framework would, but does it really matter whether moral realism is true for your argument? I mean maybe it does, but I think a lot of the literature on topics in applied ethics can work fairly independently from meta-ethical claims.
  19. Upvote
    Glasperlenspieler got a reaction from EM51413 in 2021 Closed Admissions   
    I'd be surprised if any UChicago humanities program take students. I think the change to their funding structure worked on the assumption that some students would actually be graduating this year, but given the fact that nobody is hiring, it's likely most students will stay on for another year of funding. Hard to pay for that and let in a new crop of students.
  20. Upvote
    Glasperlenspieler reacted to law student in Philosophy M.A. and then Law School?   
    My username is a little outdated now, but I did my M.A. in philosophy then went to a top-10 law school on a scholarship and now a practicing attorney. Happy to answer any questions about the path. 
    I would just add - law as a day to day job is nothing like an academic pursuit. I spend my days in excel spreadsheets and dealing with really small problems that are taken too seriously and the stress is constant. Happy to discuss more, but as far as the law world, I have probably a top 1% legal job and it is still insufferable and awful. 
  21. Like
    Glasperlenspieler got a reaction from PokePsych in Where to Publish for the First Time + Book Reviews?   
    1. I'd say it's generally a bad idea to publish a book before you have your Ph.D.
    2. Getting a good grade on something doesn't necessarily mean the professor thinks it should be published.
    3. For many (most?) fields it's not necessary to have any publications to get admitted to a good Ph.D. program.
    4. At this stage of your career, all publication decisions should be made in close coordination with a knowledgeable and sympathetic advisor (random people on internet message boards don't count).
  22. Like
    Glasperlenspieler got a reaction from The Maritime Scholar in Philosophy in an English PhD   
    Depends on what you mean. Certainly you can deeply engage with philosophy in a literature PhD program, take courses focusing on philosophy, discuss philosophers in your dissertation, etc. However, I expect most English and Comparative Literature programs are going to expect you to take significant coursework in literary studies and produce a dissertation that deals significantly with literature or another form of cultural/aesthetic production.
    You can look at the titles of recent dissertations on many departmental websites, and I think it's pretty rare for most programs to find a dissertation that is "primarily" dealing with philosophical texts. 
    It's pretty unlikely you'll find much support for pursuing analytic philosophy in a literature department. You will certainly find support in many departments to pursue studies in continental philosophy (I hate that distinction, but that's a different can of worms). But if you want to "primarily" focus on philosophy, why would you want to be in a literature department?
  23. Upvote
    Glasperlenspieler reacted to vivodito in programs suspending admission fall 21   
    Hi,
    I wanted to add a little perspective as a current PhD candidate at an ivy currently organizing to pressure my department to follow Yale and Chicago in suspending admissions for Fall 2021. The response of most programs to the disruptions presented by the pandemic has been atrocious. PhD students of all disciplines find themselves looking at what amounts to a year loss of progress towards degree--many students have had to abandon research in the US and abroad, obviously library access has been severely limited. Hiring freezes set in pretty quickly after the pandemic's outset, so the class of students meant to defend this year have had to drum up funding to keep themselves afloat, with no guarantee that any kind of job market will exist next year.
    At my institution, after a flurry of action largely organized by our student union in the Spring,  university admin made it clear that the only way departments could issue a blanket funding extension for current grads would be to forgo future admits. Every slot canceled frees up 10 semesters of funding to be redistributed among current students. I imagine the decisions at Yale and Chicago were made under similar conditions. This is a form of austerity, and all evidence points to it getting worse, not better in upper ed, with, as usual, outsize effect on the humanities.
    I think its quite easy to focus on "how" to get into grad school rather than "why" to go to grad school (which this forum obviously abets). Now more than ever I would urge all prospective PhD applicants to REALLY think deeply about the latter. To be able to ask yourself and answer honestly: am I emotionally, mentally, and financially capable of putting 5-7 years of work into a career path that most likely will not lead to employment in my field?
    Towards answering this latter question and getting a better idea of the wrecked landscape that is graduate work in the humanities currently I highly recommend perusing discussions on the Chronicle of Higher Education such as: https://www.chronicle.com/article/how-the-coronavirus-will-or-should-transform-graduate-education/
    and also discussions on Karen Kelsky's website: http://theprofessorisin.com/ 
    (her 2015 book "The Professor is In" remains a really useful read)
     
  24. Like
    Glasperlenspieler got a reaction from S_C_789 in 2021 Closed Admissions   
    Welcome to academia, the land of disillusion
  25. Upvote
    Glasperlenspieler reacted to TMP in 2021 Application Thread   
    I know it sounds really discouraging.  But honestly, do you want to enter in a PhD program when departments are fighting for funds to help people finish their degrees once those people have exhausted their 4-5 year funding packages? Departments do want to be able to commit to their PhD students to the fullest extent, thus not abandoning those further along. To do that, they would prefer not to admit (w/ blessing of the Powers to Be) new students who they cannot provide the same amount of support for the next 5-8 years. They are also freaking out about graduate students who have recently passed their exams and now need to travel to archives. Those students are supposed to be able to travel to the archives but because of travel restrictions (mostly imposed by the universities), they can't go anywhere to get going on their research.  Instead, those students are using up a semester (or two!) of their guaranteed funding packages and working as TAs and doing what they can with online archives.  Essentially, they are losing out a semester or two of guaranteed funding to the pandemic and no one knows if they will be granted extensions later on to make up for that kind of loss.  Current students come first, not any considerations for next year's cohort.
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