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SmugSnugInARug

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  1. Upvote
    SmugSnugInARug got a reaction from Marcus_Aurelius in Program's Writing Sample Page Length   
    I guess the thing I’d offer is that if one person on a committee is a stickler for page-length (and who hasn’t run into a professor like that?) that person is gonna throw out your application.
    So while there might be many successful applicants who get in because they never got those people, do you really want to risk it? Do you want to be one of the 1/5/10% of applicants this happens to?
    Obviously pinning down a number on this percentage is (basically) impossible, but the risk just isn’t worth it. And I get it, cutting sucks, its so hard, but its really an essential skill.
  2. Like
    SmugSnugInARug got a reaction from ammarahasan in Making a resource for people interested in going to graduate school. Would Appreciate some help!   
    One resource worth mentioning here, I think, is the Unlikely Academics podcast. The primary audience of the podcast is people who are under-represented, from non-research intensive schools, or are first generation post-grad students. The focus skews a bit more to advocating for those under-represented from rural areas, it does try to provide information to a broader audience. It should also be paired with podcasts like Blk + In Grad School which covers some other elements. They try to address issues from how to approach applications, to the unspoken cultural norms of grad school, and even how to talk to friends who didn’t get in during a round of applications.
  3. Upvote
    SmugSnugInARug got a reaction from you'll_never_get_to_heaven in Philosophy M.A. and then Law School?   
    I don’t know if any of the schools are up your alley philosophically, but some schools have joint Phil. MA/Law degree programs (including Georgetown, Stanford, UCLA, Boston College, Duke, and Duquesne and i’m sure plenty more).
  4. Like
    SmugSnugInARug reacted to HomoLudens in Going from an analytic dep to a continental dep   
    Yeah, your background is sort of proof that having a passion for the material (as opposed to any specific trainging) is key. Though, not everyone is as heavy duty continental as you, Sparks 😜
  5. Upvote
    SmugSnugInARug reacted to HomoLudens in Going from an analytic dep to a continental dep   
    I am at a heavy continental program. We have a number of people who went to predominantly analytic departments (Harvard, one of the UC schools, Amherst). As long as you are interested in the field, and you have a solid background, you should be fine. There are very few people that go into programs already "experts" on Husserl. Unlike, say, Kant or ancient philosophy, you probably won't need to have a strong background in Husserl to be successful.
  6. Like
  7. Upvote
    SmugSnugInARug reacted to TheFormOfTheGood in TA duties in Fall   
    Actually you may be more important than ever. If you have large class sizes and multiple discussion sections then you are much more likely to see students online through Zoom or BBCollab or whatever program your school uses. This is because the small sections are easier to manage in these high enrollment classes through the online programs, which can be glitchy and chaotic.
    Additionally, it will be much harder for professors to keep an eye on all the student class contributions. So you may need to pay even closer attention to students because it is easier for them to fall through the cracks online without ever being noticed. Also, many professors have adjusted by increasing the number of online prompts. Most, if not all, of which the TA will need to read and grade.
  8. Upvote
    SmugSnugInARug reacted to PhilCoffee in Second Masters if at Non-Prestigious MA?   
    I think Glasperlenspieler is right. There are cases that I know where people get two MA degrees, and both in philosophy. But that's because they do their first MA in the native country (in non-English world), and do the scond one in the US.
    The MA programs may not admit you. Even if they do, given that your program has a good placement record, doing a second MA might not do anything good when applying for PhD, with respect to the impressions.
  9. Like
    SmugSnugInARug got a reaction from HootyHoo in Prospective visit cancellations   
    Given the cancellations, I just want to put it out there that I’m more than happy to talk to anyone who wants to learn more about Duquesne and Boston College.
  10. Upvote
    SmugSnugInARug got a reaction from HootyHoo in Tea on Duquesne   
    The stipend is fine, largely because Pittsburgh is cheap enough. Its neither a pro nor a con.
    Faculty are all pretty great, but with one or two worth avoiding. Selcer in particular is spectacular. Evans is retiring, but will continue to teach one grad class/yr, and can still be on committees. We get to know the profs pretty well.
    I got in off the top of the waitlist.
    It feels like an academic island in a Catholic sea. The students are great and there’s a definitely a feeling of community, but the school at large runs into the usual problems Academia and Catholicism run into.
    If you want more specifics, DM me.
  11. Like
    SmugSnugInARug got a reaction from deep_field in Prospective visit cancellations   
    Given the cancellations, I just want to put it out there that I’m more than happy to talk to anyone who wants to learn more about Duquesne and Boston College.
  12. Upvote
    SmugSnugInARug got a reaction from Marcus_Aurelius in 2020 Waitlist Thread   
    For whatever it’s worth, I had a similar experience of a very personal, warm waitlist email from Duquesne, because I was #1 on the waitlist (and because faculty at most Pittsburgh schools are lovely people).
  13. Upvote
    SmugSnugInARug got a reaction from HootyHoo in 2020 Waitlist Thread   
    For whatever it’s worth, I had a similar experience of a very personal, warm waitlist email from Duquesne, because I was #1 on the waitlist (and because faculty at most Pittsburgh schools are lovely people).
  14. Like
    SmugSnugInARug got a reaction from HootyHoo in 2020 Acceptance Thread   
    Congratulations! As a current PhD at Duquesne, I’d be happy to answer any questions you might have.
  15. Upvote
    SmugSnugInARug got a reaction from HootyHoo in Philosophy Graduate Entrants 2020   
    Some of the Continental programs have interviews, though not all. Villanova certainly does, I think DePaul and Penn State do too. Check the master list for confirmation.
  16. Upvote
    SmugSnugInARug reacted to UndergradDad in Philosophy Graduate Entrants 2020   
    Well FearNTrembling, you are not too far off from hearing from Baylor- they usually send out their interview invites in the first week of February.
    Good Luck!
  17. Upvote
    SmugSnugInARug reacted to Absurd'sTheWord in Philosophy Graduate Entrants 2020   
    First time PhD applicant.
    Applied to: Boston College, University of Memphis, University of Kentucky, Baylor University, Michigan State University, Marquette University, Saint Louis University, Purdue University. 
    Good luck to all
  18. Upvote
    SmugSnugInARug reacted to MtnDuck in 2020 Interview Thread   
    One school has released interview invitations today and several schools have switched to using interviews in recent years (Baylor, Boston, DePaul, Penn State, Chicago, Iowa, UC Irvine, Villanova).  

    Since last year folks wanted to talk with one another about what questions to ask and get advice, here is a thread for that! See also this post from @directingdirections(who in turn was sharing information from a previous year) with potential questions to ask.
  19. Like
    SmugSnugInARug reacted to maxhgns in Got a B+ during the first semester of my MA program, freaking out   
    My experience has been that B-level grades in graduate school are warning signs. They're not catastrophic, and unless your transcript is full of them, they won't scupper your chances at a PhD. Nor are they, as has been suggested, grossly unfair. They're just an indication that you need to step up your game in some way.
    (For my part, I'm a firm believer that it's fair game for instructors to use the full range of grades at any level. That said, I would expect graduate students to do better in general, because they've made it through a pretty selective process which is supposed to snap up the strongest students. But that doesn't mean that the students in question don't still have a lot to learn. You don't come to graduate school ready-made into a philosopher.)
  20. Upvote
    SmugSnugInARug reacted to maxhgns in Pivoting from Philosophy of Religion MA into general Philosophy PhD?   
    Unless you're black, in which case one of these schools (hint: the name contains two letters it doesn't share with either of the other two) is a bad idea for a PhD. Your welcome will not be very welcoming, once the PR efforts slow down.
  21. Upvote
    SmugSnugInARug got a reaction from historygeek in Pivoting from Philosophy of Religion MA into general Philosophy PhD?   
    Schools like Villanova, Boston College and Fordham would certainly be welcoming to this kind of background. Most of the Catholic Continental schools usually have space for students with your background and professors who would definitely be interested in math + religion (especially if your okay with it being stuff in the history of mathematics).
  22. Upvote
    SmugSnugInARug reacted to maxhgns in Learning a new language for grad school   
    Just make a note of the auditing in your letter of interest, and plug Greekinto your CV. That'll count, and should suffice. You could have a reference mention it, too.
  23. Like
    SmugSnugInARug got a reaction from Julian0813 in Can I get a second MA in philosophy?   
    So, one of the big issues with the GRE is that the analytic writing section is notoriously unreliable. This may (or may not) be true, but that is a commonly held perception. At best, higher writing scores usually correlate to higher verbal scores. As a result, the actual treatment of the AW is sidelined in favor of the more 'reliable' (at least apparently) verbal score. On average, graduate applicants to any program try to score a 4 or higher on the AW. A high verbal plus a 3 wouldn't necessarily hurt you, except in the more competitive programs.

    With respect to the verbal score, I will repeat advice I gave elsewhere in the forum: I have been explicitly told by members of committees that verbal scores are used in the sorting process and prospective students with particularly high scores have an advantage. Often applicants in the 98th percentile (varies by year, usually 167+) and above are given preferential treatment in the process (this varies from department to department, but is far more prevalent than reading this forum might suggest). This doesn't guarantee acceptance, but is quite helpful.

    While the writing sample is the most important, if you can afford it, a higher GRE score is a good thing and really does help. And, fortunately, repeated attempts at the GRE do usually lead to better results (fewer careless errors, a better understanding of the pacing of the test, etc.)
  24. Upvote
    SmugSnugInARug got a reaction from Marcus_Aurelius in Ancient Philosopher VS Modern Philosophy   
    Hi @MarcHarold, what exactly do you mean by specializing in ancient/modern? Is there a particular distinction at your undergrad that you are referring to (like, are they two different majors?) or are you thinking more generally about the kinds of classes you want to take? Fortunately, if you are thinking generally, in most philosophy undergrads you don’t really ‘specialize,’ you just take classes your interested in (and in some cases, take a language that will help you read those particular texts you are interested enough in that you want to read them in the original language).
    I tend to recommend to my students who want to go to grad school in philosophy think of it like this: 
    1. Get a good, well rounded education in philosophy. Take courses from every topic plus the ones that interest you the most. ‘Specializing’ in a field in undergrad doesn’t really exist except if the school has distinct majors, but I suspect even then they wouldn’t look too different to grad committees. And realistically your interests are going to change. I started off in undergrad doing analytic philosophies of language and now my focus is largely on continental readings of Plato.
    2. Learn a language you want to read that is related to philosophy you actually want to read (Ancient Greek, Latin, French, German being the big four). If you fall in love with Greek/Latin, consider double majoring in classics.
    3. Take at least two or three classes in a particular topic you are really interested in, to give you a few chances to produce a solid writing sample on a subject you’ve looked at repeatedly.
     
  25. Upvote
    SmugSnugInARug got a reaction from hector549 in Ancient Philosopher VS Modern Philosophy   
    Hi @MarcHarold, what exactly do you mean by specializing in ancient/modern? Is there a particular distinction at your undergrad that you are referring to (like, are they two different majors?) or are you thinking more generally about the kinds of classes you want to take? Fortunately, if you are thinking generally, in most philosophy undergrads you don’t really ‘specialize,’ you just take classes your interested in (and in some cases, take a language that will help you read those particular texts you are interested enough in that you want to read them in the original language).
    I tend to recommend to my students who want to go to grad school in philosophy think of it like this: 
    1. Get a good, well rounded education in philosophy. Take courses from every topic plus the ones that interest you the most. ‘Specializing’ in a field in undergrad doesn’t really exist except if the school has distinct majors, but I suspect even then they wouldn’t look too different to grad committees. And realistically your interests are going to change. I started off in undergrad doing analytic philosophies of language and now my focus is largely on continental readings of Plato.
    2. Learn a language you want to read that is related to philosophy you actually want to read (Ancient Greek, Latin, French, German being the big four). If you fall in love with Greek/Latin, consider double majoring in classics.
    3. Take at least two or three classes in a particular topic you are really interested in, to give you a few chances to produce a solid writing sample on a subject you’ve looked at repeatedly.
     
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