Jump to content

urbanchic

Members
  • Content Count

    57
  • Joined

  • Last visited


Reputation Activity

  1. Upvote
    urbanchic got a reaction from ringo-ring in Will people wait until April 15 for phd programs?   
    Yea, if schools would only make admissions and funding decisions before April, it would help out everyone.
  2. Upvote
    urbanchic got a reaction from awvish in Will people wait until April 15 for phd programs?   
    Yea, if schools would only make admissions and funding decisions before April, it would help out everyone.
  3. Upvote
    urbanchic got a reaction from coyabean in What are you DOING with yourselves?   
    Trying to get this bachelor's degree.
  4. Upvote
    urbanchic got a reaction from psycholinguist in What are you DOING with yourselves?   
    Trying to get this bachelor's degree.
  5. Upvote
    urbanchic got a reaction from origin415 in Will people wait until April 15 for phd programs?   
    Yea, if schools would only make admissions and funding decisions before April, it would help out everyone.
  6. Upvote
    urbanchic got a reaction from lily_ in Should I address weak GRE scores in statement?   
    One of my schools told us that we should address low GRE scores in our essay and I did.
    Another school said they required a certain GRE score that I didn't meet, so I addressed my weak GRE score in my statement.
    So if a school is really hung up on GRE scores, I would address it.
  7. Upvote
    urbanchic reacted to Piwi in does having a master's help?   
    I just want to say that in my case, I believe I am getting into better PhD programs now (currently in a terminal MA program, graduating in May) than I would have had I applied last year (w/o MA).
    (Note: Statistics may be different in this regard, since it's not uncommon for first year PhD students to already have a masters.)

    I made the choice to not apply for PhD last year (and to apply for MA instead) for multiple reasons: (1) my undergrad is fairly unknown, so having an MA from a well known institution might help the application, (1a) I had good grades as an undergrad, but because its a lesser known school, adcomms may not know how rigorous the classes are. Thus, having strong grades from a well known institution reinforces that my GPA was not a result of easy classes; (2) many statistics jobs are available for someone with a masters so it is certainly not a waste if I got rejected from all PhDs, (2a) it is only a one year program, so I am not spending too huge of an amount; (3) it affirms for myself (and adcomms) that this is truly what I want to be studying; (4) I've been able to add to my CV, and gain access to more "famous" recommenders; and (5) my SO is at this school, so we get a full year of being in the same place before spending four years long distance.

    While reason (5) was originally my main reason, the others are all true (and are how I managed to justify it to myself). Because I didn't apply for PhDs last year, I cannot say definitively that I did better this year than I would have without the MA. However, I honestly cannot imagine that I would have gotten into these schools last year (my background was strong enough that I think I'd have gotten in places, just not the same caliber places).

    Again, statistics may be different than other programs, and a masters (as others have stated, though I think we all knew this anyway) is not a guarantee. But I wanted to point out that in my case it really did help. Ie, in answer to your question, "Yes, it can help."
  8. Upvote
    urbanchic got a reaction from minnares in does having a master's help?   
    I've noticed that this board is a bit Anti-Master's/Pro-PhD, so the answers you get in this thread are a bit biased.
    I'm all for getting a master's before a PhD if the person thinks it will help them be more prepared for the doctorate.

    1. It doesn't have to be expensive. Try a state school. Work up and save money. Many employers will pay for your degree. Some schools do fund Master's students. Look for one. If you have to get some loans, it's only for 2 years max (hopefully.) You can work and start paying them off before you start your PhD. Peace corps?

    2. Getting a job. Actually, having a Master's over a BA/BS can help you get a job...and get paid MORE. For the jobs I want, having a Master's would be a great asset and they even say graduate students get paid more. In fact, I applied to one job a few months ago that was open to both undergrads and grad students, but they turned me down because they told me they only want grad students now.

    3. Almost everyone has a bachelor's now. Having a grad degree will help. Saying a Master's will not help is like saying a PhD will not help. The article fails to mention how having a PhD does not automatically equal high pay or employment either.

    4. Experience. Getting a Master's and taking some time off will give you great experience and academic training to prepare for the PhD. It shows that you have the ability to complete graduate level work and conduct research. I'm sure you'll go into the application process with a lot more confidence too. Although I've applied to a few PhD programs, I feel more comfortable starting a Master's program this Fall. Getting my master's will help me clarify what I really want to study before I make a long-term commitment to start the PhD. I can also get plenty of work and life experience that will help make the PhD experience more meaningful. In fact, I even met with some schools and they questioned why I wanted to go straight to the PhD. They highly recommended I get a Master's first.

    5. A waste of time? How is getting an education (Master's) a waste of time? It's what you make it. I never understood this rush of wanting to hurry and get the PhD over with. Why not just enjoy life as it is? You'll still be 40 whether you get your PhD at 26 or 28. If you're in a hurry to get the PhD process over with, you make it seem like a horrible experience. Why try to get one in the first place?

    If you have thorough research experience, have successfully taken many graduate level courses as an undergrad, and know exactly what you want to research then going straight to PhD may be good for you. If you want more academic training and assurance that getting a PhD is for you, then getting a Master's may be the better option.

    Overall, I really don't understand the discouragement towards getting a Master's and don't think it's necessary to knock those that want to get a Master's before a PhD.

    Having a Master's does help.
    off soap box. lol
  9. Upvote
    urbanchic got a reaction from lily_ in does having a master's help?   
    I've noticed that this board is a bit Anti-Master's/Pro-PhD, so the answers you get in this thread are a bit biased.
    I'm all for getting a master's before a PhD if the person thinks it will help them be more prepared for the doctorate.

    1. It doesn't have to be expensive. Try a state school. Work up and save money. Many employers will pay for your degree. Some schools do fund Master's students. Look for one. If you have to get some loans, it's only for 2 years max (hopefully.) You can work and start paying them off before you start your PhD. Peace corps?

    2. Getting a job. Actually, having a Master's over a BA/BS can help you get a job...and get paid MORE. For the jobs I want, having a Master's would be a great asset and they even say graduate students get paid more. In fact, I applied to one job a few months ago that was open to both undergrads and grad students, but they turned me down because they told me they only want grad students now.

    3. Almost everyone has a bachelor's now. Having a grad degree will help. Saying a Master's will not help is like saying a PhD will not help. The article fails to mention how having a PhD does not automatically equal high pay or employment either.

    4. Experience. Getting a Master's and taking some time off will give you great experience and academic training to prepare for the PhD. It shows that you have the ability to complete graduate level work and conduct research. I'm sure you'll go into the application process with a lot more confidence too. Although I've applied to a few PhD programs, I feel more comfortable starting a Master's program this Fall. Getting my master's will help me clarify what I really want to study before I make a long-term commitment to start the PhD. I can also get plenty of work and life experience that will help make the PhD experience more meaningful. In fact, I even met with some schools and they questioned why I wanted to go straight to the PhD. They highly recommended I get a Master's first.

    5. A waste of time? How is getting an education (Master's) a waste of time? It's what you make it. I never understood this rush of wanting to hurry and get the PhD over with. Why not just enjoy life as it is? You'll still be 40 whether you get your PhD at 26 or 28. If you're in a hurry to get the PhD process over with, you make it seem like a horrible experience. Why try to get one in the first place?

    If you have thorough research experience, have successfully taken many graduate level courses as an undergrad, and know exactly what you want to research then going straight to PhD may be good for you. If you want more academic training and assurance that getting a PhD is for you, then getting a Master's may be the better option.

    Overall, I really don't understand the discouragement towards getting a Master's and don't think it's necessary to knock those that want to get a Master's before a PhD.

    Having a Master's does help.
    off soap box. lol
  10. Upvote
    urbanchic reacted to spectralScatter in does one's ethnicity/racial identity matter?   
    Does ones racial background matter?
    Yes, because a committee wants a minority canidate that is smart, poise, and capable in their ambitions. Moreover, there are more funding resources such as fellowships and federal grants that cam support these students, so that a department doesn't have too .

    Is there anything wrong with this? No, and here are 3 descriptions of the challenges that minority students face in applying and being accepted.

    1) The GRE is biased against anyone who is not from an English background. Example: There are tons of Anglo-Saxon words that test verbal ability, and only few to no words derived from Latin. A disadvantage to those who speak romance languages at home, but admissions are caring less about the GRE

    2) Many minorities grow up without the proper educational resources, and are further instilled with the idea that they can't handle careers in the STEM fields .

    3) A greater proportion of minorities (to majorities) are disadvantaged, because they are first college generation and have to work to support their education.

    I'm a minority, and I am interviewing. My background and experience in my field are the reasons why I am being accepted. For example, a minority canidate with a weaker profile who interviewed at Z university at the same time as me was denied.

    So racial background matters, but it won't affect the acceptance rates for you white folks. Please stop bickering, and don't blame minorities for any issues you may have. Cool thanks.
  11. Upvote
    urbanchic got a reaction from anxiousapplicant in does having a master's help?   
    I've noticed that this board is a bit Anti-Master's/Pro-PhD, so the answers you get in this thread are a bit biased.
    I'm all for getting a master's before a PhD if the person thinks it will help them be more prepared for the doctorate.

    1. It doesn't have to be expensive. Try a state school. Work up and save money. Many employers will pay for your degree. Some schools do fund Master's students. Look for one. If you have to get some loans, it's only for 2 years max (hopefully.) You can work and start paying them off before you start your PhD. Peace corps?

    2. Getting a job. Actually, having a Master's over a BA/BS can help you get a job...and get paid MORE. For the jobs I want, having a Master's would be a great asset and they even say graduate students get paid more. In fact, I applied to one job a few months ago that was open to both undergrads and grad students, but they turned me down because they told me they only want grad students now.

    3. Almost everyone has a bachelor's now. Having a grad degree will help. Saying a Master's will not help is like saying a PhD will not help. The article fails to mention how having a PhD does not automatically equal high pay or employment either.

    4. Experience. Getting a Master's and taking some time off will give you great experience and academic training to prepare for the PhD. It shows that you have the ability to complete graduate level work and conduct research. I'm sure you'll go into the application process with a lot more confidence too. Although I've applied to a few PhD programs, I feel more comfortable starting a Master's program this Fall. Getting my master's will help me clarify what I really want to study before I make a long-term commitment to start the PhD. I can also get plenty of work and life experience that will help make the PhD experience more meaningful. In fact, I even met with some schools and they questioned why I wanted to go straight to the PhD. They highly recommended I get a Master's first.

    5. A waste of time? How is getting an education (Master's) a waste of time? It's what you make it. I never understood this rush of wanting to hurry and get the PhD over with. Why not just enjoy life as it is? You'll still be 40 whether you get your PhD at 26 or 28. If you're in a hurry to get the PhD process over with, you make it seem like a horrible experience. Why try to get one in the first place?

    If you have thorough research experience, have successfully taken many graduate level courses as an undergrad, and know exactly what you want to research then going straight to PhD may be good for you. If you want more academic training and assurance that getting a PhD is for you, then getting a Master's may be the better option.

    Overall, I really don't understand the discouragement towards getting a Master's and don't think it's necessary to knock those that want to get a Master's before a PhD.

    Having a Master's does help.
    off soap box. lol
  12. Upvote
    urbanchic got a reaction from mastermind1886 in does having a master's help?   
    Yup, getting a Master's will definitely help you. What program are you interested in for your Master's?
    Also, try to get some field work while you get your Master's and raising your v+q GRE scores could help too.
  13. Downvote
    urbanchic got a reaction from seadub in does having a master's help?   
    Yup, getting a Master's will definitely help you. What program are you interested in for your Master's?
    Also, try to get some field work while you get your Master's and raising your v+q GRE scores could help too.
  14. Upvote
    urbanchic got a reaction from johndiligent in MARCH IS IT!!!!   
    Taking my seat in the front row and grabbing popcorn. I think this is where I belong.
  15. Upvote
    urbanchic reacted to urbanchic in FEBRUARY IS IT!!!   
    Yes, a bit late, but I rather March is it than April is it.
  16. Downvote
    urbanchic got a reaction from seadub in FEBRUARY IS IT!!!   
    Yes, a bit late, but I rather March is it than April is it.
  17. Upvote
    urbanchic reacted to LadyL in For everyone worried they won't get in...   
    ...please, please know that it is not the end of the world even if that does happen.

    I am the who everyone thought would get in the first time and didn't after being wait listed at two programs. I got a job in my field and reapplied 2 years later, and same deal - wait list but no acceptance. It was crushing. I was mortified that I'd had to ask my mentors for letters twice and still hadn't gotten in. My family was supportive but obviously shared my disappointment. It sucked, I wanted to crawl in a hole and die for a few weeks after, but I picked myself up eventually and moved on.

    I worked on publishing data. I was able to expand my skill set at my job, and pick up another mentor in the process. I applied again, this time to three times as many programs, of course spending three times as much money. I had to get special permission from one program to apply for a third time which made me feel like a big loser. I braced myself for not getting in anywhere and possibly changing careers.

    Yesterday one of my programs emailed me. As I read the subject line my stomach dropped: my first rejection, here we go again.

    And I was wrong. It was an acceptance with full funding from a school I'd visited and loved.

    I got to do the jumping around screaming happy dance and got to hear how excited my parents were when I called to let them know. And I've gotten to re live the excitement every time I tell another co worker, friend, or family member *especially* the ones who know my history and how hard I've worked.

    And the amount of satisfaction and relief I've felt in the past 36 hours outweighs the three YEARS where I was either applying or in between application periods, wondering if I was ever going to make it in my field. Wondering why I had such crap luck, applying last year as the economy fell apart, constantly wait listed but never chosen.

    So whatever happens for you this year...if it's your first, second, third, fourth round or greater, just remember that it does not make you a loser, it is not a reason to give up, and if you keep at it it WILL happen for you.
  18. Upvote
    urbanchic got a reaction from expressionista in bye bye phd   
    Maybe you should wait until you get all of your results first.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.