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diana.

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Posts posted by diana.


  1. Hey yall.

    I tried to search through the forum but I only went through the first 3 pages and found nothing so I just thought I'd start a thread.

    I'm planning on moving to Arizona in a few weeks and plan to stay there until I hear back from schools for Fall 2017. I've lived in Texas all my life, graduated from a University here in Texas. My question is - Will I still be able to qualify for in-state tuition for Texas schools for the Fall of 2017? 

    Everywhere I have looked says that as long as I had paid in-state tuition at a University in Texas for more than one semester, then I should qualify but I just wanted to hear someone else confirm it from their own experiences. 

    I really hope that I will still qualify for in-state tuition in Texas. :( 


  2. I wouldn't bother getting RBT certified unless it would give you a pay-increase at your job. 

    Like AspiringSLP2be said, it's nice to have on your resume but it's just a title - it doesn't define your actual skills aside from the fact that you completed the hours and passed an exam for the certificate. 

    I'm not RBT certified and I have been an ABA therapist for a year and a half now. It doesn't make me any less of a therapist compared to someone who is certified. If my job offered to pay me more for the certificate, I would do it. The amount of knowledge and experience you get as an ABA therapist will definitely change the way you view the field.

    At the end of it, I really think it matters on your experiences and how you express them in your SOP, not just the title. 

     


  3. At USU, If you apply as a degree-seeking student going for your "2nd Bachelor's", you are eligible for financial aid. If you go for the non-degree seeking student, you either have to pay out-of-pocket or get a loan. 

    http://comd.usu.edu/htm/faq/#online2ndBachelors

    There's a link in the event you decide to apply to USU.

    Each school is probably different so your best bet is to call the financial aid office for whatever school you decide to attend to complete your pre-reqs! :)


  4. 7 hours ago, Crimson Wife said:

    Most people say that 3500 is easy, but my dialect made it incredibly frustrating. I don't think of myself as having a particularly strong New England accent but it's different enough from the textbook author's that I struggled with getting the "correct" answers. Ugh!

    I took 2500 and 3100 together and thought that was a good combo. My 2nd semester I took 5900 and 3400 and thought that was also a good combo. 3100 is all exam-based and 3400 is mostly exam-based (there is one group paper and the optional-but-worth-doing model of the middle ear project). 2500 has tedious short answer questions each week and 5900 has weekly simulation writeups plus the observation reports.

    Thanks for the info! I decided to switch my schedule and do 2500 with 3500 instead of 3100. Hopefully I can adjust quickly to the online format of the classes! 


  5.  

    14 hours ago, wannabeSLPnc said:

    I think you'll be fine taking those two courses. I found 2500 very manageable. 3100 can be tough especially if you haven't taken an anatomy course before, so I think it's good to pair those two courses together. I worked full-time while taking at least 2 courses at USU per semester... one semester I took three :) You'll be fine as long as you manage your time well!

    I have not taken an anatomy course before - I've taken pretty much every other science besides anatomy, lol. I'm hoping that by easing myself in, I can work up to taking three classes in a semester! :) Thanks for your reply! 

     

    On 4/25/2016 at 10:12 PM, SouthernDrawl said:

    3500 was easier for me, but I have an MA in Linguistics. I took two classes last semester and am in three now while working full time. I took 2500 in the fall and am in 3100 now! I have enjoyed them both and have managed A's in both. I think it just requires organization and self-motivation. You can do well taking them simultaneously!

    Thanks for the words of encouragement! I actually just stumbled upon a link for a facebook group for USU COMD students last night after searching for USU help! 
    https://www.facebook.com/groups/109935279077833/
    Lots of helpful advice from there too! :D 


  6. So I've decided to do my pre-reqs online from USU and I'll be starting in a few weeks.

    I am registered for the following 2 courses:
    COMD2500 - Language, Speech, and Hearing Development
    COMD3100 Fundamentals of Anatomy for Speech and Language.  

    Any advice on the two courses from former/current USU students? I've never taken online courses before and just registered for these two to see how well I can balance the workload while working full-time. 
    I also would be open to taking COMD3500 Phonetics instead of COMD3100 if that class is known to be easier?

    I'm so nervous since I've been out of school for a year and a half. Any help would be appreciated! :) 


  7. I didn't get accepted to any of the schools I had applied too for Fall 2016. :/ The plan is to continue working as an ABA therapist and taking some online post-bac classes from USU in a few weeks. It's not grad school, but I'm really excited to get into the school grind and hopefully show admissions how dedicated I am to getting into the field during the next admissions cycle! :)  


  8. 7 hours ago, diana. said:

    After researching for places to take pre-requites, I landed on a nice surprise! University of Northern Colorado had a FAQ where they had listed places to potentially complete pre-requisites online. I thought I'd share as I know many of us are looking and it can be a real headache trying to comb through all the information. The FAQ was last updated in 2013 so I'm not sure how valid the information is but at least it gives you a list of potential schools to further look up rather than being on a wild goose chase.

    ----

    ***The list provided below does not constitute a recommendation or endorsement of any of these programs and may not be comprehensive. It is provided for informational purposes only.

    Eastern New Mexico University
    http://liberal-arts.enmu.edu/health/cdis/online.shtml

     

    Idaho State University
    http://www.isu.edu/csed/progOpp/opp.shtml

     

    Longwood University
    http://www.longwood.edu/socialworkcsds/SLPonline.htm

     

    LaSalle University
    http://www.lasalle.edu/schools/snhs/pre_slp/

     

    Red Rocks Community College
    http://www.rrcc.edu/communication/index.html

     

    Texas Women’s University
    http://www.twu.edu/communication-sciences/5950.asp

     

    University of Colorado at Boulder

     

    University of South Florida
    http://www.sarasota.usf.edu/academics/CAS/academics/nd_lsh.php

     

    University of Wyoming
    http://uwadmnweb.uwyo.edu/comdis/info.asp?p=12471

     

    Utah State University
    https://comd.usu.edu/htm/online-education/online-post-bachelors-degree

     

    Western Kentucky University
    http://www.wku.edu/chhs/cms/index.php/pre-slp//

     

    Florida State University
    https://commdisorders.cci.fsu.edu/academic-programs-admissions/graduate-prerequisites-bridge-program/

    Cal State Northridge
    http://tsengcollege.csun.edu/programs/CDSP

    Northwestern
    http://sps.northwestern.edu/program-areas/post-baccalaureate/prespeech-pathology/

    Mass General Institute
    http://www.mghihp.edu/academics/center-for-interprofessional-studies-and-innovation/prerequisites-health-care-professions/default.aspx

    Fontbonne (geared for SLP Assistant training) - **Unable to find a direct link
     

    Akron & Cincinnati (might be limited to localish applicants the way their distance master's is, you'd have to check)
    https://www.uakron.edu/sslpa/gslpp/dl-slp-program/collab.dot

    ***About Our Program

    The University of Akron and the University of Cincinnati have partnered to offer a collaborative distance learning graduate program that leads to a master’s degree in speech-language pathology.

    Please note the following: Students need to live within a 2-3 hour radius of either Akron or Cincinnati as we are not able to support clinical practicum from greater distances.

    As a non-major - you would need to complete 3 courses - plus the ASHA requirements
    1. Language Science & Acquisition
    2. Anatomy & Physiology of Speech & Hearing
    3. Introduction to Hearing and Speech Science

    Again, this list is not comprehensive and if you have experience or know of other schools that offer online courses, feel free to comment below and I'll add it to this list :) 

    I couldn't seem to edit my initial post again.....so i guess bump - added with the rest of the universities yall have listed! Thanks :D


  9. After researching for places to take pre-requites, I landed on a nice surprise! University of Northern Colorado had a FAQ where they had listed places to potentially complete pre-requisites online. I thought I'd share as I know many of us are looking and it can be a real headache trying to comb through all the information. The FAQ was last updated in 2013 so I'm not sure how valid the information is but at least it gives you a list of potential schools to further look up rather than being on a wild goose chase.

    ----

    ***The list provided below does not constitute a recommendation or endorsement of any of these programs and may not be comprehensive. It is provided for informational purposes only.

    Eastern New Mexico University
    http://liberal-arts.enmu.edu/health/cdis/online.shtml

     

    Idaho State University
    http://www.isu.edu/csed/progOpp/opp.shtml

     

    Longwood University
    http://www.longwood.edu/socialworkcsds/SLPonline.htm

     

    LaSalle University
    http://www.lasalle.edu/schools/snhs/pre_slp/

     

    Red Rocks Community College
    http://www.rrcc.edu/communication/index.html

     

    Texas Women’s University
    http://www.twu.edu/communication-sciences/5950.asp

     

    University of Colorado at Boulder

     

    University of South Florida
    http://www.sarasota.usf.edu/academics/CAS/academics/nd_lsh.php

     

    University of Wyoming
    http://uwadmnweb.uwyo.edu/comdis/info.asp?p=12471

     

    Utah State University
    https://comd.usu.edu/htm/online-education/online-post-bachelors-degree

     

    Western Kentucky University
    http://www.wku.edu/chhs/cms/index.php/pre-slp//

     

    Florida State University
    https://commdisorders.cci.fsu.edu/academic-programs-admissions/graduate-prerequisites-bridge-program/

    Again, this list is not comprehensive and if you have experience or know of other schools that offer online courses, feel free to comment below and I'll add it to this list :) 


  10. 12 hours ago, carathestudent said:

    Hi.

    I graduated with a Bachelor's degree in English and have no SLP experience. I've been doing a lot of research lately and see there are many "leveler" programs that I can apply for to start my education towards becoming an SLP. I'm looking at NAU, U of A, and St. Cloud.... 

    I'm really worried about how my application will stand against someone who has much more experience in the field than me.

    My GPA is 3.9... I haven't taken the GRE yet, but I know my scores need to be stellar. I feel like my Statement of Purpose will be pretty strong, despite my lack of experience in the field. I was in a coma for 3 months and had to undergo physical, speech, and occupation therapy afterwards... so that's kind of my angle, as I do want to help others who find themselves in this life changing situation.

    Anyways, what do you think my chances are of being accepted into a program? Do you think it's a better idea if I study to become an SLPA before applying to a program and why? I've considered this, but I'm not sure how much extra time it'll take to go from SLPA to SLP, as opposed to just jumping in headfirst and working towards SLP (why not just go for the gold?). And, do you have any other advice for me?

    Thank you so much for your thoughts!!!!!

    Sorry to answer your question -- I'm also an out-of-field applicant and I went into work as an ABA therapist and have been able to observe many speech sessions with my clients. It is something you could consider looking into doing while you wait to hear back from programs.

    I was told from someone who completed NAU's SLPA certificate track that those courses could easily transfer into their Master's program if you chose to apply there - that way if you needed to find work, you could work as a SLPA while completing your Master's program.


  11. 1 hour ago, racoomelon said:

    (I'm not really a leveler student, but I kind of am. I got a lot of my coursework done this year as a senior, but I'm still missing a few courses. So I'm essentially a 2 year student, just with a bit of catch-up to do. I still had to stick with programs that had a leveler option, though.)

    The biggest plus about a leveler program is, like others have said, that you're in the program; you won't need to reapply. And after experiencing the stress ball that is the application process, I can honestly say that I'm so glad I won't be applying again come fall. That said, I think it's to your benefit to apply to both leveling programs and post-bachs. Just to be safe, and just to be sure that you'll be enrolled in some sort of program next year. Everyone has pretty much already covered the whole post-bach v. leveler points, so I'll bring up something else that might be worth thinking about.

    You won't have as many choices if you go the leveler route. I had initially wanted to apply to more Texas schools because I'm a resident there, and in-state tuition is a huge plus. I found out (after I sent the 7 free GRE scores <_<) that most Texas schools don't allow out-of-field applicants. In fact, UT Dallas (and possibly UT, though I remain unsure about that one) was the only school I could apply to for a leveling program-- it's an awesome program, yes, but it was the only one out of five schools I wanted to apply to that I qualified for. It sucks realizing that you don't qualify for most of your application list. This might not really affect you (maybe all of your top choices have a leveling option), but I just thought it might be something you'd want to consider.

    Baylor accepts out-of-field applicants too! 


  12. YAY ABA therapists! :) I currently work as an ABA therapist here in Texas! I've been working for a little over a year and have loved every minute of it (even on the rough days). I'm so thankful for my job as it has led me to SLP as a profession. I love my kiddos and they are what drive me to continue to persevere through another round of applications! As a lot of posters above me have stated, ABA is not for everyone but it could also lead you down another path to pursue a BCBA instead.

    People experience different things with ABA so I can only tell you a bit of what I've gone through! I've been spitted at, hit, kicked, hair-pulled, and had a chair thrown at me. All these behavior episodes fade in the back when I've seen the progress my kids have made. Literally my kiddos have so much potential just locked inside and I love being able to see them blossom. I've also had the opportunity to observe countless speech sessions and continue to grow more in love with the field. 

    There is a need for SLPs who have experience with autism because I've seen so many SLPs come through and are just unprepared when dealing with my clients. One behavior episode and they are running for the hills! lol 

    Anyway, not trying to scare you away - just not many people will tell you about the challenges of the job and I prefer to be straight-forward. Again, ABA isn't easy - but it definitely is rewarding in every way and will shape you into a wonderful SLP. :D 


  13. 4 minutes ago, j_rae said:

    Ugh I agree!! But then again, I feel a little better knowing that I'm not the only one anxiously awaiting; maybe they just send all of their decisions later in the month. I've seen people on this forum who have heard from a few of my other schools, and it's actually torture knowing that they've been in touch with them and not me :wacko:. Hopefully we both receive good news when we finally hear from them!

    I know, it makes me worried that I got rejected or something :( Praying we both hear good news soon!


  14. 4 minutes ago, Lunalulu2 said:

    Thanks! I am still pretty shocked. I honestly thought I wasn't going to get in anywhere due to my cumulative GPA. I haven't made any decisions yet. I really would like to move outside of Florida for grad school but can't justify paying double for out of state tuition. I am still hoping for a funding offer but if that doesn't happen then I would probably take my spot at USF. 

    Your GRE score and CSD GPA definitely made up for your cumulative GPA that's for sure :D I don't think any of us can justify paying double for anything unless we were to win the Powerball. :lol:

     


  15. 43 minutes ago, Lunalulu2 said:

    USF has two options: full time 4 classes per semester so 1 year or part time 2 classes per semester so it takes two years 

    Thanks for letting me know! And btw, congrats on your acceptances! I see you've gotten 4 so far! Which university is your #1 choice?! :) 

    BTW, Anyone out there have any experiences with Idaho State?!?!


  16. 20 hours ago, Lunalulu2 said:

    USF's program is 12 classes but seems to contain all of the prerequisites for all programs. It is also asynchronous. One perk of a 2nd bachelors is that you can get financial aid easier.   

    Do they cap you as to how many courses you can take in a semester if you're taking classes online? I know at my university for undergrad, you had to get cleared by the department if you wanted to get over like 18 credit hours. 

    1 hour ago, Crimson Wife said:

    In terms of the leveling vs. full 2nd bachelor's, one thing to keep in mind is that the fewer courses you take at the undergrad level, the more you'll have to take at the grad level paying $$$$ for graduate tuition. Also, a bachelor's in CSD is required in my state for SLP Assistant licensing. If I want to have the option of working as a SLPA either PT during grad school (like the Northern AZ summers-only program) or FT if I don't get in the first time around, I need to have the 2nd bachelor's.

    It looks like a lot of these leveling programs have a separate tuition rate and aren't considered graduate or undergraduate courses. I just worry it would take longer to get a 2nd bachelor's degree vs. just taking only a few recommended pre-reqs. 


  17. My friend got an SFA interview as well and she was told that she would be given a writing prompt and have 30 minutes to write it (She could bring her own laptop). They also want her to wear her alma mater's tshirt and kahkis or slacks. Such a strange request..?  


  18. 23 hours ago, diana. said:
    23 hours ago, sudsnbubbles said:

    I am also an out-of-field applicant. I did my post-bac at CSUSM. Though I loved the professors, I am still missing a couple really important courses (specifically Aural Rehabilitation). My advice would be to see which programs offer the most courses which apply to the Master's programs you would like to enter. My biggest mistake was just jumping into a program without doing as much research as I should've. 

    I would also look into more programs which have a prerequisite program which gives automatic admissions into their Master's program if you do well. I know Cal State Northridge has a program like this. 

     

    Great idea! I've been so focused on looking at all the available online programs I didn't think to research which courses I'd actually need for my chosen Master's program. This should help narrow my choices as well. I will be sure to add Cal State Northridge onto the list! :)  

    23 hours ago, slptobe92 said:

    I'm currently in Longwood's SLP Online program and I love it! The professors are incredibly helpful, especially for it being totally online. Honestly some of them are more helpful than teachers I had during my undergrad which was all in-person! It's really affordable, too (I'm in-state though) and I highly recommend it.

    Added Longwood onto the list. I don't think this school even popped up when I googled online programs! Though from a quick glance through their FAQ, it looks like out-of state would cost $350 vs the in-state tuition at $275 per credit hour! :( Definitely jealous. I'll still check it out and look through their program some more. THANK YOU!

    22 hours ago, Cowsy said:

    Hi there! I took three online classes through Northwestern and three through USU. Planning one more through USU this summer.

    Northwestern's program only has five classes, which could potentially be an issue when it comes to fulfilling all requirements for certain graduate programs. However, each class I took covered a lot, perhaps more than the course title might indicate. For example, Intro to Audiology covered sound and acoustics, anatomy, physiology and neurology of the ear and hearing, and audiological history, principles and methods. Obviously not all topics were covered to the degree they might be in a standalone course on acoustics or neurology, though. 

    Northwestern is expensive. The classes were $1600 or $1700 each. The classes were small, though, which was a major advantage as I was able to form relationships with my professors even online. I had two letters of recommendation from NU professors. 

    USU was great. The classes are huge and your work may be graded by TAs, but the professors are still accessible. It's a very well-run program. I felt NU's program was a little haphazard at times, for example not knowing who the professor for a course would be until the day before it started. I don't think that would happen with USU. Also, the number and variety of course offerings are extensive, and the price was about 1/2 of what I spent on NU for each course. 

    I feel the course content of each program helped prepare me well and I would recommend both overall. :-) 

    I did notice that Northwestern's program was complied only in 5 courses - which is kind of intimidating and then the tuition was alarmingly high. Were the classes difficult? I was told from a friend that their program is a lot harder than most.

    Oh and I'll definitely look into USU! I think tuition is going to play a huge role in where I end up going - were you able to use financial aid for either Northwestern and USU?

    10 hours ago, limegreen19 said:

    I'm taking 2 courses right now online through Kean University. It's not that expensive, but I'm in-state. Not sure if there's a difference for out-of-state people for online classes. The two that I'm taking are super easy (intro to communication disorders and language development) and require very little time commitment, which allows me to work a couple part-time jobs and save for grad school.

    That actually sounds amazing because I wanna be able to continue working to save up for grad school and worry the course load will be too much. I couldn't find tuition for out-of-state online courses on their website. How much do you pay in-state online?

    9 hours ago, Crimson Wife said:

    I'm in my 3rd semester (doing 2-3 courses at a time) at Utah State. USU doesn't have every pre-req for every grad school (no neuroanatomy, fluency, voice disorders, multicultural, or autism) but it has most of them. Tuition is pretty reasonable (cheaper than Sacramento State or Cal State Northridge even though I'm a CA resident) at $299/credit.

    One reason I chose them is because USU has a strong graduate training program in Listening and Spoken Language for the deaf & hard-of-hearing. When I checked out the bios of the students who were in the LSL program, every single one of them had either a 1st or 2nd bachelor's from USU. So I got the sense that USU really favors its own undergrads in their grad admissions. That's something that I've heard is true for certain other schools (like many of the Cal States) and is worth checking into if your "dream" grad school offers a post-bacc/2nd bachelor's.

    Thanks so much for the reply. I hadn't had the chance to look at the courses USU offers so it's good to know they don't offer them all so I can be aware of other programs that might have the ones they are missing. :) I have a special interest in autism so I'd have to find a program that offers more courses in that specialty. The $299 per credit just sounds so nice though!! How is the workload at USU?

    8 hours ago, Lunalulu2 said:

    I am in my last semester of USFs online 2nd bachelors in CSD. I have really enjoyed the program. I work full time and I feel like the part time program (2classes per semester) has been really manageable. The majority of the teachers have been great and I feel like I have learned a lot. If you have any more questions feel free to message me. Good luck!

    Thanks so much for taking the time to reply -- I'll have to check USF program. I haven't considered grabbing a 2nd bachelors. Does it take longer than completing just the necessary pre-req courses?

     

    1 hour ago, copaceticbroad said:

    I have been taking pre-reqs through Eastern New Mexico University. I picked it because they use an asynchronous model (you can watch the lectures whenever you like), they offer many different classes in most semesters, and they are very reasonably priced. The professors and the classes have been fine; I haven't formed particularly close connections with the professors, but that's my responsibility, not theirs. The one professor who agreed to write my LOR has been very helpful (and I should probably send her thank-you flowers in the near future...). They also offer 8 week and 16 week classes, which is a nice option. I took two 8 week classes my first term (summer) and I felt like I was losing my mind; since then, I have taken one 16 week class each semester, and that has been much more manageable. 

    I love that they use an asynchronous model (I had no idea that was a term). This would make scheduling work easier and take the stress off of having set "class hours". Thanks so much for sharing your experiences! I'll be sure to check into their program!! :D And congrats on your acceptances!

     


  19. Hi everyone!

    I'm an out-of-field applicant and applied to only 2 in-state graduate programs that accommodate students like me! I'm currently looking to attend an online post-bac program in the event that I do not get accepted into either of the programs. I heard that Idaho State and Northwestern had great online programs to complete my pre-reqs, but was hoping to hear other people's personal experiences! I also saw UW-EAU Claire as a top link when searching for online programs but don't know anyone whose taken courses online from any of these schools. I'd appreciate any advice/comments! :) 

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