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E-P

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  1. Like
    E-P got a reaction from Schy in Embarrassing incident at prof's house   
    I agree with everyone else.  There's a big difference between a wardrobe malfunction and "Through no fault of my own, I was injured."  It's definitely up to you to set the tone.  If I had to guess, he was in fight or flight mode, and probably didn't spend very much time looking at your naked-bits.  If it had been me with a male student, I'd've grabbed a towel and covered you for modesty until help arrived.  And then denied that I had even glanced at anything.
    If you want to defuse the situation immediately (assuming the professor has a sense of humor), buy a non-slip shower mat, put a bow on it, and present it to him during your meeting.  Maybe bring some hummus to snack on.  In my experience, when something embarrassing happens, you can either ignore it, and let shame overwhelm you, or you can totally and 100% own it.  I find the latter is better for mental-health.
  2. Upvote
    E-P got a reaction from tranquila in Embarrassing incident at prof's house   
    I agree with everyone else.  There's a big difference between a wardrobe malfunction and "Through no fault of my own, I was injured."  It's definitely up to you to set the tone.  If I had to guess, he was in fight or flight mode, and probably didn't spend very much time looking at your naked-bits.  If it had been me with a male student, I'd've grabbed a towel and covered you for modesty until help arrived.  And then denied that I had even glanced at anything.
    If you want to defuse the situation immediately (assuming the professor has a sense of humor), buy a non-slip shower mat, put a bow on it, and present it to him during your meeting.  Maybe bring some hummus to snack on.  In my experience, when something embarrassing happens, you can either ignore it, and let shame overwhelm you, or you can totally and 100% own it.  I find the latter is better for mental-health.
  3. Upvote
    E-P got a reaction from cefran in Results System: Features you'd like to see?   
    How hard would it be to add a place for preferred pronouns in addition to gender, and then we have the ability to write in what we want, rather than choose from a list?  Especially for people who choose "Not Telling" as a gender, it would help other folks be able to refer to them respectfully.  We can put it in our profiles, of course, but if there were a designated place for it, folks would know where to look.
    At least in my field, there seem to be a lot of trans* forum particulars, so it would be useful. :-)
  4. Like
    E-P reacted to Psyhopeful in 2019 Applications Thread   
    I just got accepted to the University of Michigan with a Rackham Merit Fellowship!!! I am stunned and so very happy, this school was my top choice and such a great research fit!
  5. Upvote
    E-P reacted to coffeeaddict2230 in 2019 Applications Thread   
    just got my first offer from OSU, good luck everyone!
  6. Upvote
    E-P reacted to JLRC in About NCA, ICA student membership   
    I would advise not paying for it until/unless you are going to their annual conferences. The conference registration discount for members is much larger than the membership fee, so joining basically lowers the cost of attendance at the conferences. There's not much benefit to continuing to give them your money in years that you aren't attending the conferences, though. If your department is paying for it, of course, then there's no harm in being a member and a few small benefits.
  7. Upvote
    E-P reacted to placeinspace in to research or not to research?   
    I'm not in your field, but I strongly suggest you go with your gut and choose Dr. X, who you already know is supportive of you and your work, and is familiar with your background. My mentor was in a completely different specialty than what I ended up doing, but she was incredibly helpful and supportive and willing to go above and beyond to help me out because of our rapport. I truly think this is the best you can hope for out of an advisor.
  8. Upvote
    E-P reacted to IceCream & MatSci in Should I change my major and give up on SLP   
    @Penelopepie I think you will have a better chance at getting advice from SLP peeps if you post your questions at https://forum.thegradcafe.com/forum/95-speech-language-pathology/
    Good luck!
  9. Upvote
    E-P reacted to SLPwannabe! in What is your plan B?   
    This will be my third year applying! My first two years I only applied to one school but this year I'm applying to multiple. I'm really focused and determined to get into a program so I just keep trying every year and opening up my options!
  10. Like
    E-P got a reaction from kp_87 in Communications/Film/Media Studies PhD Applicants   
    Hi - welcome!
     
    1. What was your GRE score? 163 verbal, 151 quant, 5.0 writing
    2. past college GPA: BA - 3.4.  MA - 4.0
    3. Did you have any publication experience?  Nope
    4. Did you have and related work experience in the field of communications/media studies/film?  Not directly.  But I spent 10+ years in management at various tech companies, which -- given that I'm interested in online communicative communities -- probably helped.
    5. What school were you accepted to and what did they offer full funding?  I was accepted at Purdue (full funding, guaranteed 4 years, 2 classes each semester), and MSU (full funding, but I declined before I got the details).  For other funding stuff, I've started a spreadsheet for people to record their experiences: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1r563bGkj3JsqGrnNKIct1phwgoqJou1ZKdq3iifhAdQ/edit?usp=sharing
  11. Upvote
    E-P reacted to Warelin in Which Masters am I eligible for?   
    I think the first question you need to ask yourself is this: What do you want to do in life and will a Master's degree help you achieve this?

    If it will, what type of Master's degree will help you reach your goal? Once you have that answer, look into programs that will help you reach that goal.

    Not everyone needs a Master's degree though. And it should never be something that should be done because you're trying to avoid something else or are unsure of what to do. Rather, it should be something that you want to do.
  12. Upvote
    E-P reacted to gradswag in Funding Spreadsheet?   
    Hi friends,
    There is a whole website dedicated to tracking stipends from different schools/programs:
    http://www.phdstipends.com/
  13. Upvote
    E-P got a reaction from juilletmercredi in Debating options   
    I would ask, in general, what your goals are.  It seems that you've been somewhat directionless since graduation, which is fine -- you're young!  It's okay! -- but a graduate degree is a longterm relationship.  What are you hoping to get out of it?  Where do you want to be when it's over?  If you go PhD, what are you wanting to research?  If you're going LIS, what are you wanting to do with that (since people with library degrees actually becoming librarians is getting fewer and further in between)?
    I would say that your first step is some soul searching, and getting a better job.  The better job will give you the freedom to go to graduate school because you want to, not because you have to escape your current situation.  It will also give you the financial resources to apply (it's expensive!), and to afford to go, since I doubt your MA or MLIS would be funded.  Ideally, it would also give you educational benefits - if you get even an entry-level job at a big enough company, you may very well be able to pursue graduate school on their dime.
    I find that a lot of times in my life when I've been unhappy with my life/job, it's more because I'm unhappy with who I am as a person, not necessarily the situation.  It might be worth meditating on whether or not you're happy in your own skin.  I call this "Life broken, add more schooling!"  Having been there, I don't recommend it.
     
    I know this isn't the answer you wanted, and I'm sorry for being the rainy cloud on your parade.
  14. Upvote
    E-P got a reaction from PsyDGrad90 in Debating options   
    I would ask, in general, what your goals are.  It seems that you've been somewhat directionless since graduation, which is fine -- you're young!  It's okay! -- but a graduate degree is a longterm relationship.  What are you hoping to get out of it?  Where do you want to be when it's over?  If you go PhD, what are you wanting to research?  If you're going LIS, what are you wanting to do with that (since people with library degrees actually becoming librarians is getting fewer and further in between)?
    I would say that your first step is some soul searching, and getting a better job.  The better job will give you the freedom to go to graduate school because you want to, not because you have to escape your current situation.  It will also give you the financial resources to apply (it's expensive!), and to afford to go, since I doubt your MA or MLIS would be funded.  Ideally, it would also give you educational benefits - if you get even an entry-level job at a big enough company, you may very well be able to pursue graduate school on their dime.
    I find that a lot of times in my life when I've been unhappy with my life/job, it's more because I'm unhappy with who I am as a person, not necessarily the situation.  It might be worth meditating on whether or not you're happy in your own skin.  I call this "Life broken, add more schooling!"  Having been there, I don't recommend it.
     
    I know this isn't the answer you wanted, and I'm sorry for being the rainy cloud on your parade.
  15. Upvote
    E-P got a reaction from Zaheersboi in Debating options   
    I would ask, in general, what your goals are.  It seems that you've been somewhat directionless since graduation, which is fine -- you're young!  It's okay! -- but a graduate degree is a longterm relationship.  What are you hoping to get out of it?  Where do you want to be when it's over?  If you go PhD, what are you wanting to research?  If you're going LIS, what are you wanting to do with that (since people with library degrees actually becoming librarians is getting fewer and further in between)?
    I would say that your first step is some soul searching, and getting a better job.  The better job will give you the freedom to go to graduate school because you want to, not because you have to escape your current situation.  It will also give you the financial resources to apply (it's expensive!), and to afford to go, since I doubt your MA or MLIS would be funded.  Ideally, it would also give you educational benefits - if you get even an entry-level job at a big enough company, you may very well be able to pursue graduate school on their dime.
    I find that a lot of times in my life when I've been unhappy with my life/job, it's more because I'm unhappy with who I am as a person, not necessarily the situation.  It might be worth meditating on whether or not you're happy in your own skin.  I call this "Life broken, add more schooling!"  Having been there, I don't recommend it.
     
    I know this isn't the answer you wanted, and I'm sorry for being the rainy cloud on your parade.
  16. Upvote
    E-P reacted to imd in Going back to school at 36 but worried I'm getting too old   
    Hi Steven, 
    I will share with you my own personal experience. I apologize in advance if it seems like a long-winded post. I started my Phd last year when I was 35  ( I am 36 now, as well)  in a Humanities/Social Science program at an Ivy League College . I always dreamed of an academic career but due to family issues, I  had to work right after college. I had a great job, but I also felt completely apathetic, and I thought I needed to do something that makes me feel alive again. I decided to try out my luck and pursue this old dream. Of course, I had several worries not just because of age, and the dismal job prospects (I had for many years followed blogs about the misery of grad life and the uselessness of a Phd in Humanities) but I put all this aside and decided to focus my effort on pursuing this thing. Aside from the application process, here are a couple of challenges that I have faced:
    1. Whether programs will consider you or not: I am in the Humanities, I am afraid I do not have an answer for this specific concern in the sciences. It may be a challenge, because many people have to join specific labs/research groups and most people in sciences Phd's are fresh-grads, as far as I know. I did have this concern as well when I was applying. I tried to emphasize in my personal statement that the skills I acquired during my professional career (the responsibilities, managing teams and projects, budgets..etc) will basically help me get through the many years of the Phd. My program had many people in the 30's, this actually encouraged me to apply. You can check the grad student profiles on the department websites of the programs you are interested in, to get a sense of their backgrounds.
    2. The job market sucks: that means you really need to a get in a very good program if you want to have any chances of getting a job. By a good program, I mean the very best. Pedigree matters a LOT. One professor actually told me you did 50% of your job search by virtue of by being in this particular college. This was the top priority for me, I would not have left my very good job and salary if I did not know that I will end up in the best place.
    3. Financial: Never do this unless you have full financial support from your program! And even if you do, this will definitely be a HUGE compromise. If you are professional, then you will have a very different standard of living and lifestyle. You will live on an allowance, the stereotype of a poor grad student running between events for free lunches and scrapping to make ends meet at the end of the month, is a painful reality! and unless you put your heart and soul in pursuing this then this will hit you the hardest! By all means try to make it break-even, do NOT dip into your savings (if you have any). I am single and I do not have any dependents, if you have a family or any dependents, you need to think thoroughly of how the financial aspects play out. 
    4. Don't expect to be able to pick where you left off at the tender age of 23. Going back to study at the age of 35 is one of the hardest things I ever did in my life, and I am struggling with it. I was at the top of my class all my life and now I am finding it hard to keep up with everything and everyone. It's not that learning slows down as you grow older (although some studies actually prove this) but the set of skills you have acquired over your professional career is very different than that required for Academia. To acquire a new set of skills at this age is harder. It will take longer to finish things, to comprehend things and a lot of self-confidence and motivation not to feel like an imposter, but you can make up for that by working harder than everyone. Again, you have to be willing to put 100% of your heart and soul in this experience to make it work. And at times it will be frustrating but other times totally exhilarating. 
    5. Everyone is younger. I never realized that I am "old" until I actually started this program last year. This is frustrating, I am single and I did not realize before coming in Academia that almost EVERYONE is younger than I. In the Humanities, my sense is that people usually start their PhD's around the age of 25-28 and in Sciences I guess around 23-26. And while it could be great to hang around younger folks who have different set of challenges, I simply feel I am past many of theirs. I do have a tonne of friends though, and I have an active social life, I try not to make this matter, but it's always at the back of mind (maybe that's just me!)
    But on the other hand this could be something good, for example, I have travelled a lot and I have worked for 12 years,  so now I don't feel this huge pressure to finish ASAP  to go out to the "real world". This actually makes me focus more on my studies and on producing better quality research. I also cope well with the cynicism and the petty drama of Academia. By the age of 36, you have experienced enough in life to know how to handle such situations and not let them get to you.
    5. This is a horribly narcissistic and lonely enterprise, it is very personal. It will test your very essence, your mettle and intelligence and sometimes you may realize you have reached your limits (and for me this was the scariest thing!) you will have to prove yourself all over again and again because everyone around you will be younger they may not be able to grasp what you are going through. The cliched adage of  "fake till you make it" never felt more true! But again because it is a personal enterprise, every little success feels like a huge triumph and at the age of 36 it is incredible and fascinating to feel again to be able to learn new things and create new things
    Now, I have painted a very bleak image. But let me tell you this: So far, I think this was the best decision I ever took and I feel alive more than ever. I have concerns of course about my job prospects, but I am in a better position than my colleagues because well if worst comes to worst, I will just go back to my old career. Also, because it feels harder for me now at this age to go through those challenges, I feel even more persistent to make it succeed more than others around me. Every little win feels like a huge accomplishment. 
    Best of luck! 
     
     
  17. Downvote
    E-P got a reaction from spectastic in Tattoos in grad school   
    Is your university an environment where you can discuss the "not cool" aspect with that professor?  More than likely, since you're in a field not known for high emotional IQ, he doesn't know how inappropriate the comment is.  Alternatively, could you mention it to the Title IX people at your school?  Maybe they have suggestions of gentle ways to give him feedback about commenting on women's clothing/style choices?
     
    It's shitty that you have to defend yourself against harassment - but this IS harassment.  And you shouldn't have to deal with it to go to work.
  18. Like
    E-P reacted to ResilientDreams in Is writing sample necessary for PhD in Social Psychology?   
    Sorry to be completely obnoxious, but people in Iran speak Farsi, not Arabic. I'm part Iranian myself.
  19. Upvote
    E-P reacted to PsyDGrad90 in Is writing sample necessary for PhD in Social Psychology?   
    The personal statement/statement of purpose is different from the writing sample. A writing sample is an example of your academic writing. People usually use their thesis, but a paper you wrote for a class can also work, if you have any in English. You can reach out to the program to see what they typically have international students do. 
  20. Upvote
    E-P reacted to ZeChocMoose in Do new professors get relo budgets?   
    In my experience - tenure track faculty get relocation budgets (and usually start up funding).  The relocation budget can be a flat fee or some percentage of your salary.  If you end up with a non-tenure track faculty position - I think whether you get a relocation budget varies widely. 
    If your monthly budget can afford it - I would put away some money into savings.  It is also expensive to be on the job market because typically you'll need at least a new interview suit and may need to pay for a portion of your travel to interviews (or at least front the costs until you get reimbursed.)  
  21. Upvote
    E-P reacted to MinaminoTeku in Qualitative coding software   
    Multiple colored highlighters and pens was my coding for my thesis. Good to know that software actually exists to do it for me xD
  22. Upvote
    E-P reacted to PsyDGrad90 in Anyone dealing with a move AFTER starting classes?   
    This may be a silly question, but how far away is your parents home from your new apartment? If it is not exceptionally far, you can make sure to just move the essentials (furniture, clothes, specific books) and then sift through the rest of the things when on break or something. It appears that you will be living with them while commuting for the 1st few weeks, correct?
  23. Like
    E-P got a reaction from poliscibi in Is it GPA suicide to complete 30 credits in two semesters (fall/spring)?   
    Duuuuuude.  I graduated undergrad in 2004, and I'll be finishing my PhD around age 39.  Most of the people starting the PhD program at my school are in their 30s.  Looking in this forum, a good chunk of folks are in their 30s, with a handful 40s+.  Doing a PhD/academia as a second career is very, very common.

    Basically, don't let being in your late 20s stop you if that's what you want.  You would certainly not be the oldest person in your PhD cohort, if you go that route.

    And it's probably a good idea to not say you're "too old" to do something in a mixed audience, since there will certainly be people present who are older than you.   Probably more relevant a pro-tip for future day jobs than random strangers on the Internet.
  24. Upvote
    E-P reacted to BabyScientist in Lack of autonomy   
    Go to one of these people. Even another PI in your department who you feel comfortable with. That is no way for a graduate student to be regarded and consulting people in the program about your problem is the best way to solve it. 
  25. Upvote
    E-P reacted to ZeChocMoose in Using a class term paper for my thesis   
    I agree. This is generally what students in my PhD program were encouraged to do as well especially for trying out topics for our comprehensive exams and for the dissertation.
    I mean, you can't generally take your class paper, do no extra work on it, and then turn it into your thesis because that would be odd and probably wouldn't pass because it is not comprehensive enough - but it's a great jumping point as @fuzzylogician describes.
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