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PsyDGrad90

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  1. Like
    PsyDGrad90 got a reaction from TrustingTheProcess in Deciding where to apply??   
    Yes, research fit is one of the biggest factors, as you are rarely applying to the program as a whole and more so applying to work with a specific faculty member. You can start by going onto the APA website that lists all of the accredited programs. Go to the individual websites of different programs and peruse faculty. One of the easier ways that I found when I was making my list was to look at publications in my area of interest and seeing where those faculty are located and then looking at those programs. A lot of people also recommend buying The Insider's Guide Graduate Programs in Clinical and Counseling Psychology. This book describes all programs and ranks them on a scale of research vs clinical emphasis. I personally did not use it and just went off of information from school websites, but a huge number of people find it very beneficial. APA accredited programs are required to report student outcome data, so many have a page or PDF that described outcome data in regards to internship match rate and licensure rate. The majority of them also include data on how many applications they receive, how many students they accept each year, and the Quant, Verbal, and Writing GRE scores and GPA. This can give you a sense of how you stack up to the average accepted student for that program. Most people apply to between 10-15 programs given the low acceptance rate. The stats are that you have about a 1-2% chance of being accepted to any one program, and about a 10% chance overall. Having a mix of R1s, R2s, and even R3s is recommended. R1s are usually the most competitive. 
  2. Upvote
    PsyDGrad90 got a reaction from Fantasmapocalypse in How much does prestige matter? School Psych PsyD   
    First, try to arrange a visit to School B. Hating something in high school is so different than looking at a program now as an adult. Visit and then see if that helps to make your choice easier. If you still hate it, then there's your answer. 
    Also, I'm confused how the research-oriented project is not a dissertation, but the practice-oriented one is. A dissertation is traditionally a research-oriented document. Granted I don't know much about school psych, but several school psych people in my area are in the same practicums as clinical psych folks. 
  3. Like
    PsyDGrad90 got a reaction from TrustingTheProcess in Deciding where to apply??   
    Yes, research fit is one of the biggest factors, as you are rarely applying to the program as a whole and more so applying to work with a specific faculty member. You can start by going onto the APA website that lists all of the accredited programs. Go to the individual websites of different programs and peruse faculty. One of the easier ways that I found when I was making my list was to look at publications in my area of interest and seeing where those faculty are located and then looking at those programs. A lot of people also recommend buying The Insider's Guide Graduate Programs in Clinical and Counseling Psychology. This book describes all programs and ranks them on a scale of research vs clinical emphasis. I personally did not use it and just went off of information from school websites, but a huge number of people find it very beneficial. APA accredited programs are required to report student outcome data, so many have a page or PDF that described outcome data in regards to internship match rate and licensure rate. The majority of them also include data on how many applications they receive, how many students they accept each year, and the Quant, Verbal, and Writing GRE scores and GPA. This can give you a sense of how you stack up to the average accepted student for that program. Most people apply to between 10-15 programs given the low acceptance rate. The stats are that you have about a 1-2% chance of being accepted to any one program, and about a 10% chance overall. Having a mix of R1s, R2s, and even R3s is recommended. R1s are usually the most competitive. 
  4. Like
    PsyDGrad90 got a reaction from TrustingTheProcess in Deciding where to apply??   
    Yes, research fit is one of the biggest factors, as you are rarely applying to the program as a whole and more so applying to work with a specific faculty member. You can start by going onto the APA website that lists all of the accredited programs. Go to the individual websites of different programs and peruse faculty. One of the easier ways that I found when I was making my list was to look at publications in my area of interest and seeing where those faculty are located and then looking at those programs. A lot of people also recommend buying The Insider's Guide Graduate Programs in Clinical and Counseling Psychology. This book describes all programs and ranks them on a scale of research vs clinical emphasis. I personally did not use it and just went off of information from school websites, but a huge number of people find it very beneficial. APA accredited programs are required to report student outcome data, so many have a page or PDF that described outcome data in regards to internship match rate and licensure rate. The majority of them also include data on how many applications they receive, how many students they accept each year, and the Quant, Verbal, and Writing GRE scores and GPA. This can give you a sense of how you stack up to the average accepted student for that program. Most people apply to between 10-15 programs given the low acceptance rate. The stats are that you have about a 1-2% chance of being accepted to any one program, and about a 10% chance overall. Having a mix of R1s, R2s, and even R3s is recommended. R1s are usually the most competitive. 
  5. Upvote
    PsyDGrad90 got a reaction from spidy in Accept offer without funding or see if I get off waitlist - any advice?   
    Yes, waitlists are a thing, but that's why there's a (more or less) universally held deadline of April 15th, so that people have time to get all decisions in. The way students get off waitlists is when someone holding multiple offers releases one. Typically those are not accepted offers someone pulls but an offer someone holds and then rejects. Once you accept an offer and commit to a school, you are expected to keep that commitment. Same thing as in the real job market. If you sign paperwork formally accepting a job offer and pull it, that can definitely have negative backlash. It's not guaranteed, but some fields are a small world and taking that chance can come back to bite you later. It may vary in different fields, but my field definetely takes these guidelines seriously and reaffirms (and extends) them within it's own professional network of graduate training programs. Maybe other fields don't care as much. I also don't see how the CGS resolution does not apply: " In those instances in which a student accepts an offer before April 15 and subsequently desires to withdraw that acceptance, the student may submit in writing a resignation of the appointment at any time through April 15. However, an acceptance given or left in force after April 15 commits the student not to accept another offer without first obtaining a written release from the institution to which a commitment has been made."
    https://cgsnet.org/april-15-resolution
    If OP did not formally withdraw that acceptance prior to April 15th, they would need to be formally released from their prior commitment (and there is no guarantee they will provide that release). There is the caveat that OP wasn't guaranteed funding in the offer, but if that funding does come through before the April 15th deadline, then these guidelines definitely apply 
    And absolutely, I would hope that anyone posting for advice on these forums would be using information recieved here as an addition to advice they get from mentors in real life. 
  6. Like
    PsyDGrad90 got a reaction from earsnbrains in Columbia or Penn?   
    I feel like this will be very dependent on your field. 
  7. Like
    PsyDGrad90 got a reaction from Applicant4788 in GRE Psychology subject test - SCORING?   
    https://www.ets.org/gre/subject/scores/how
    You add up the number correct and that's your raw score. They changed the scoring in the 2017-2018 cycle, so that may be the reason for conflicting info. 
  8. Upvote
    PsyDGrad90 got a reaction from gillis_55 in Fall 2019 Clinical Psychology Applicants (PhD, PsyD)   
    Yeah, clinical psych PhDs/PsyDs are some of the most competitive doctoral programs to get into in the US. A lot of it goes into research fit. Strong PsyD programs (such as Baylor) will also require a research component. The best thing to do is to look for programs where you have a good research fit with at least 1 faculty in the program. The average applicant will apply to 10+ programs and take approximately 2 cycles to get accepted somewhere. Also, be mindful of rankings and geographic location. A school like UC-Berkeley is both highly ranked (and very, very research heavy) and also in a desirable (albeit incredibly expensive) area. They get a lot of applicants for their few spots. Schools in the California and NYC area are typically going to get even more applicants just because they are "desirable" areas to live. This is not to say that it's easier to get into a school in the midwest or something, but the applicant numbers are significantly less. Overall, I think the stats are that an applicant has about a 10% chance of getting into any program and about a 1-2% to get into any 1 program (hence applying to min. 10). 
    Good luck! It's a long and difficult process, but you can't lose hope!
  9. Like
    PsyDGrad90 got a reaction from Soruganti in Fall 2019 Clinical Psychology Applicants (PhD, PsyD)   
    I've heard the University of Denver PsyD is a good program, but incredibly expensive. Same with Palo Alto.
    The stats for the Michigan Professional School look horrendous. No one has ever placed in an APA accredited internship and the licensure rate is at about 50%, so only half of graduates of the program are actually able to be licensed as a clinical psychologist (it's a professional degree, so they should be producing significantly more licensed professionals). If you look at the EPPP pass rate, they have about 56% of students passing it, which is also incredibly low. I know you are an international student. However, those are really poor outcomes, so I would stay away from that one. Numbers like that usually point to poor training within the program itself. 
  10. Like
    PsyDGrad90 got a reaction from DRMF in Choose Your Own Adventure   
    It definitely sucks. I was in a similar situation where I thought I was a shoe in for my top choice program, and then I got the rejection. I got an offer from another program that I applied to which was originally lower on my list, but I am so happy at the program I'm in. The rejection is tough, but you also have to look at the positives. Again, you're situation may be different, but you have to look past the disappointment of rejection and look at the program you have an offer from and consider it by itself, without the sting of rejection. 
  11. Like
    PsyDGrad90 got a reaction from Soruganti in Fall 2019 Clinical Psychology Applicants (PhD, PsyD)   
    I've heard the University of Denver PsyD is a good program, but incredibly expensive. Same with Palo Alto.
    The stats for the Michigan Professional School look horrendous. No one has ever placed in an APA accredited internship and the licensure rate is at about 50%, so only half of graduates of the program are actually able to be licensed as a clinical psychologist (it's a professional degree, so they should be producing significantly more licensed professionals). If you look at the EPPP pass rate, they have about 56% of students passing it, which is also incredibly low. I know you are an international student. However, those are really poor outcomes, so I would stay away from that one. Numbers like that usually point to poor training within the program itself. 
  12. Like
    PsyDGrad90 got a reaction from 2019MSWHopeful in Loans cover Tuition and Rent (don't know what to do about Books, Gas, Food)   
    Based on your name, I'm assuming it's an MSW program. I know many people who have worked full-time while pursuing an MSW. Even full-time, masters level degrees usually allow for time to work. PhDs are usually tougher because of all the added research requirements and funding is usually tied to working as an RA or TA. I would also try to limit the loans as much as possible (I know they are hard to remove altogether) because loan interest can rack up quickly and MSWs aren't always the highest earners. PSLF is a crapshoot given how many people have been denied for it thus far, and you don't want your overall quality of life to suffer afterwards because of heavy student loan payments. 
  13. Like
    PsyDGrad90 got a reaction from literalturtle in Staying at UG institution for MS   
    Staying for your MS/MA isn't a big deal. A lot of people do. There's also many programs that gave combined BA/MA programs where students earn both simultaneously. You don't know want to stay for your PhD though. 
  14. Like
    PsyDGrad90 got a reaction from Nothingtown in relocating advice   
    You could also get free boxes from stores. They usually have tons of boxes after deliveries (I'd avoid food stores, but places like liquor stores or Home Depot or something). Just go in and say you're moving and are hoping if they have any boxes. They may have some or tell you "our next shipment is on x day, come then." I have never paid for moving boxes. Worst case, you drive around back of some malls and grab a bunch of boxes you see out by the dumpsters. 
  15. Upvote
    PsyDGrad90 got a reaction from Jaytown5 in New York, NY   
    Given the cost difference, I would go with Rutgers. It has a phenomenal reputation around here. I've worked with tons of Rutgers MSW grads over the years, and they were all extremely competent as social workers and clinicians (those who had the LCSW). Actually, I've known plenty of people from Rutgers and Columbia, but I actually haven't met anyone with an MSW from NYU. 
  16. Like
    PsyDGrad90 got a reaction from Nothingtown in relocating advice   
    You could also get free boxes from stores. They usually have tons of boxes after deliveries (I'd avoid food stores, but places like liquor stores or Home Depot or something). Just go in and say you're moving and are hoping if they have any boxes. They may have some or tell you "our next shipment is on x day, come then." I have never paid for moving boxes. Worst case, you drive around back of some malls and grab a bunch of boxes you see out by the dumpsters. 
  17. Like
    PsyDGrad90 got a reaction from personallycentered in Do online programs typically ask to interview?   
    It's definitely a tough call. You could see if you could still get some sort of research at UCI and at least get a poster or something because research products (conference posters and talks and pubs) are some of the most crucial aspects of applications for PhD and reputable PsyD programs. I guess it would all depend on if there were potential research opportunities through UCI and how long it would be before you could have the opportunity to pursue an in-person program. 
  18. Like
    PsyDGrad90 got a reaction from bandanajack in Choosing Master's over Ph.D.?   
    I would go with the PhD if offered. In the long run, it will save you time and money. Most PhDs don't transfer over a lot of MA credits, and the cost of being in school for additional time will definitely have an impact on your earnings potential in the long run. 
  19. Like
    PsyDGrad90 got a reaction from Katie B in Computers for Students   
    Social science here too. I love my Surface. The versatility is great for reading and annotating pdfs. Powerful enough to run stats software. Lightweight for great portability and good battery life. 
  20. Like
    PsyDGrad90 got a reaction from personallycentered in Trying to switch to Clinical Psych after leaving counseling Master's program   
    Yes, the advice you got about pursuing full-time RA positions is accurate. Research experience, with posters and publications, is one of the biggest factors in getting into a PhD program. 
  21. Like
    PsyDGrad90 got a reaction from lynnle1994 in Do online programs typically ask to interview?   
    If you want to apply to a forensic oriented PhD in the future, I would definitely recommend you seek out an on-site forensic psych masters if possible, especially one that has a thesis option (a quick look at the UCI website says that you do a capstone instead of an empirical thesis, which is a little bit of an orange (not quite red) flag). Forensic psych is a very small world, and if you have research experience in the forensic psych field with known researchers, that will go a long way into getting into quality programs. 
  22. Upvote
    PsyDGrad90 got a reaction from Fantasmapocalypse in Do I have a chance of getting into a PHD program?   
    You're definitely in good shape. I would echo what Fantasmapocalypse said in that you should try to get some posters/publications in before you apply. You didn't specify what type of psych program (clinical or purely experimental such as developmental based on your interests), but clinical is a bit more competitive. An MA is often good if you are unsure if you are ready for grad school and want to test the waters or if you have to make up for a poor undergrad GPA (which is not your case). If anything, you would best be suited by taking a position as a lab manager/research coordinator for a year or 2 between applications if it doesn't work out next application season (get paid instead of paying for courses that will most likely not transfer). Overall, if you can make a big push for a few research products ASAP before you apply then you should be in good shape. Just make sure that you look for programs with a good research fit, ask for strong letters of recommendation, write a solid statement of purpose (SOP), and try not to restrict yourself geographically as to not limit viable research match options. 
  23. Like
    PsyDGrad90 got a reaction from personallycentered in I got admitted to a Clinical Psychology program but was told that the POI is not good. What should I do?   
    A counseling psych program should also give you training in assessment and diagnosis. Look at the course list and student handbook for the counseling program. In practice, counseling psychology and clinical psychology are very similar. 
    Note: there is a difference between a doctorate in counseling and a doctorate in counseling psychology. I'm assuming the program is counseling psych?
  24. Upvote
    PsyDGrad90 got a reaction from TiredOfApps in Do Masters decision usually come later than PhD?   
    It probably depends on the school, but I would assume so, especially because many PhD programs will ask applicants if they want to be considered for the Masters if they aren't accepted to the PhD program.
  25. Like
    PsyDGrad90 got a reaction from personallycentered in I got admitted to a Clinical Psychology program but was told that the POI is not good. What should I do?   
    A counseling psych program should also give you training in assessment and diagnosis. Look at the course list and student handbook for the counseling program. In practice, counseling psychology and clinical psychology are very similar. 
    Note: there is a difference between a doctorate in counseling and a doctorate in counseling psychology. I'm assuming the program is counseling psych?
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