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PsyDuck90

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  1. Upvote
    PsyDuck90 got a reaction from Le Chat in Put off Applications until Completion of Master's?   
    There is really no right answer for this one. I took time off between my MA and applying to doctoral programs. That gave me time to publish my MA thesis and to work with my intended population, gaining valuable experience and also saving some money. I ended up taking 3 years off total and will start a program this fall. For me, it really helped solidify what exactly I wanted and gave me valuable research ideas (I work in the field of IPV, so I got to see first hand where more research is needed). Plus, I knew that after 3 years, that this was still what I wanted to do. The only thing I would do differently would be to continue actively doing research in that time. 
    Plus, having a healthy savings account from a full time job is definitely a plus to supplement your stipend/invest and watch grow. 
  2. Like
    PsyDuck90 got a reaction from MarineBluePsy in master psych decision to make   
    Assuming this is a stepping stone to a doctoral program, I would also consider research match and opportunities for products (posters and publications).
  3. Upvote
    PsyDuck90 got a reaction from Miiit in PhD or Master degree first? (Immigrant, working mom, career shift)   
    One of the biggest factors is research experience with products (posters and publications). You could try and see if you can get either a paid RA position at a college in your area, or even volunteer if that's feasible. Also, look at the pre-reqs that the PhD programs require. Since none of your degrees are in psychology, you may not have the pre-req courses. You don't need an MA, so look to see if you can get the research and required coursework in other ways. 
    Also, be mindful that you are looking at schools in a highly competitive and coveted area, which may make the process more difficult. 
  4. Upvote
    PsyDuck90 reacted to fuzzylogician in question about academic offence   
    Listen, multiple people have told you that this scenario you're imagining is entirely implausible. Now you're telling us that you can't even find the supposedly plagiarized part. What's the worry, then? There is no way your professor will go back and look through this paper for plagiarism -- why would he ever do that in the first place? And apparently there's nothing to find. Again, no one will revoke a PhD degree because of a problem with one third of one sentence in an undergraduate paper.
    Take this as a learning and growth opportunity. Stop working last minute in the middle of the night, so you're not causing yourself this kind of anxiety again. And for the love of god, have mercy on your professors and stop writing sentences that are 62 words long. 
  5. Upvote
    PsyDuck90 got a reaction from Susheetah in What are my chances ?(PsyD/PhD Clinical Psychology)   
    One of the most important things to consider is research fit. Most schools work on a mentor model, meaning you are applying to work with a specific professor. Therefore, you want to look at programs individually and examine the research being done and how well it matches with your interests. That is how you pick schools. From there, you can look at their admissions outcomes: average GPA and GRE scores of incoming students and try to make sure you are within those ranges. Most programs look at your application as a whole, with research and publications and posters as the most important. Keep in mind, clinical psych programs are incredibly competitive, so even if everything is perfect, you may still not get into a program the 1st application cycle. 
  6. Upvote
    PsyDuck90 got a reaction from kitcassidance in What are my chances ?(PsyD/PhD Clinical Psychology)   
    One of the most important things to consider is research fit. Most schools work on a mentor model, meaning you are applying to work with a specific professor. Therefore, you want to look at programs individually and examine the research being done and how well it matches with your interests. That is how you pick schools. From there, you can look at their admissions outcomes: average GPA and GRE scores of incoming students and try to make sure you are within those ranges. Most programs look at your application as a whole, with research and publications and posters as the most important. Keep in mind, clinical psych programs are incredibly competitive, so even if everything is perfect, you may still not get into a program the 1st application cycle. 
  7. Like
    PsyDuck90 got a reaction from psych0 in Stony Brook Psychology - Any opinion?   
    They are a top ranked program, but they are more heavily on the research/academic side. It depends on OP's goals. If they are looking for a balanced program, they may not be the happiest at Stony Brook. 
    A lot of PCSAS schools can play that power move because manybgraduates do not pursue licensure and therefore do not care about APA accreditation status. This is evidenced by Stony Brook's 65% licensure rate. So its definitely a great program, but not necessarily the right type of program based on what OP's goals may be.  
  8. Like
    PsyDuck90 got a reaction from psynerd in Fall 2018 Clinical Psych Interview Invites   
    If you've been in contact with any of your POIs, you can ask them where they feel you can improve your application. It really is a crappy situation. I felt so dejected when I didn't get an interview at my top choice school (I had a really positive back and forth with my POI too). Clinical programs are just so incredibly competitive that sometimes it is just luck. I have 3 years of research experience, a 1st author publication, and 3 years of working full time with my population of interest, and I only got 1 interview (and still waiting to hear back on that). The way I've been coping is just reminding myself that the competition is fierce, but I really believe this is my intended career path. I've talked to some people that push forward and others who look at MA level credentials such as a licensed counselor or LCSW. I feel like a lot of it is really examining your end goals and seeing what you need to do to get there. 
  9. Upvote
    PsyDuck90 got a reaction from Sl2fc in Fall 2019 Psychology PhD Applicants!   
    While social psychology programs aren't as competitive as clinical, there is still a lot of stiff competition. LA and NYC are two of the most desirable locations (any city on the coasts falls into this category), which significantly increases competition. If you are able to be more geographically diverse, I would recommend doing so. I would also consider trying to find some volunteer experience in traditional lab settings if at all possible. Try reaching out to faculty in the nearest college who do research similar to your interests. 
  10. Upvote
    PsyDuck90 got a reaction from Psycholostress in Fall 2018 Clinical Psych Interview Invites   
    If you've been in contact with any of your POIs, you can ask them where they feel you can improve your application. It really is a crappy situation. I felt so dejected when I didn't get an interview at my top choice school (I had a really positive back and forth with my POI too). Clinical programs are just so incredibly competitive that sometimes it is just luck. I have 3 years of research experience, a 1st author publication, and 3 years of working full time with my population of interest, and I only got 1 interview (and still waiting to hear back on that). The way I've been coping is just reminding myself that the competition is fierce, but I really believe this is my intended career path. I've talked to some people that push forward and others who look at MA level credentials such as a licensed counselor or LCSW. I feel like a lot of it is really examining your end goals and seeing what you need to do to get there. 
  11. Upvote
    PsyDuck90 got a reaction from psychcat in Overwhelmed Undergrad: Gap Year and Grad School Advice?   
    The biggest thing PhD programs care about is research. Make sure to spend that time in the labs to present posters/try to publish. You could also try applying for research assistant jobs.
  12. Upvote
    PsyDuck90 got a reaction from Eanertodt in Declining Offer Thread   
    Just be careful with this, as CUDCP rules state you are only supposed to hold 2 offers at a time. Granted, I don't know how they can really enforce these rules, but I was told by a DCT that their program strictly follows that. 
  13. Upvote
    PsyDuck90 got a reaction from lewin in Changing career plans. How to tell parents? Advice appreciated   
    No one can tell you how your parents will respond, as that's entirely dependant on their personalities. Based on your mother's comment of the world doesn't need anymore psychologists, she may not understand the extent of what psychologists can do. You just have to come out and tell them. They'll figure it out soon enough when you start applying for programs. My advice would be to just outline to them exactly what you wrote in this post:  OT doesn't excite you, you've been working in a psych research lab, and you want to switch trajectories. After all, that's part of what undergrad is all about. 
  14. Like
    PsyDuck90 got a reaction from 1|]010ls10o in Fall 2018 Clinical Psych Interview Invites   
    The APPIC website has the stats. 
  15. Like
    PsyDuck90 got a reaction from RidiculousResearcher in Finding Clinical Masters Programs   
    The best advice that I can think of is to look at the researchers publishing within your field of interest and seeing what universities they are affiliated with. If your ultimate goal is PhD and you really want to get the master's first, then you want to be in a lab that is within your area of interest. Clinical programs still heavily look at your research experience, including posters and publications, and you could potentially bolster that more through the master's program. 
  16. Like
    PsyDuck90 got a reaction from 1|]010ls10o in Have you ever re-applied to a program/PI and get accepted after being rejected the first time?   
    I'm only in my 1st cycle, but the POI in my top choice program told me that they wished they could've extended me an interview invite and stated I should apply again next year if I don't enter a program this fall. I'm assuming not all programs operate like this, but given the low acceptance rate, many schools understand the importance of persistence. You could be an ideal candidate, but so can 2 other people, and all of you are vying for 1 or 2 spots. 
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