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samiamslp

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  1. Upvote
    samiamslp got a reaction from SLP97 in Graduate School Tips   
    the most important thing for me: it's okay that you don't know everything. in fact, it's okay if it feels like forever since you've looked at your phonetics work or your memory of anatomy and physiology is a bit spotty. first of all, you will get plenty of review in all that stuff in grad school. second of all, if you're feeling like you must be the only one who doesn't know things, always remember that you're not! everyone is in the same boat at the beginning. and, as the semester continues, if you're in clinic or in classes and feeling a little bit (or a lot bit) lost and overwhelmed, it's still okay that you don't know everything. in fact, it's normal to not know most things. plus, if you see friends who look like they know what they're doing a more than you feel you do, remember that everyone learns differently and it's okay if it's taking you a little longer to grasp how to write clinical objectives or SOAP notes or whatever else you're struggling with- you will get there. also, what may come relatively easily for you may be harder for those you're seeing. two words of advice via my clinical supervisors, because they are words that i know live by. 1) from my first clinical supervisor: "it's often more important for you to know what information you don't know than knowing what you do know-- that's how you learn." 2) from my second, when I admitted to her that I didn't know how help my client with one language element which he was struggling with about a six weeks into the semester: "Well, how could you know how to treat all the specifics of that?! You've only been focusing on it for the past six weeks! You think anyone has a full grasp on anything after six weeks? Look at what you have learned during that time; that's pretty incredible." 
    I will probably have imposter syndrome for the rest of my life (it's pretty much the SLP curse, let's be real) but i will always have those words to come back to. because you will struggle. there will be things that are hard for you. but it's okay if you don't know all the information or you feel like you're muddling through your intervention sessions for a bit. that's normal. it's okay. and you will get there.  
  2. Like
    samiamslp got a reaction from amanda_rensch in Graduate School Tips   
    the most important thing for me: it's okay that you don't know everything. in fact, it's okay if it feels like forever since you've looked at your phonetics work or your memory of anatomy and physiology is a bit spotty. first of all, you will get plenty of review in all that stuff in grad school. second of all, if you're feeling like you must be the only one who doesn't know things, always remember that you're not! everyone is in the same boat at the beginning. and, as the semester continues, if you're in clinic or in classes and feeling a little bit (or a lot bit) lost and overwhelmed, it's still okay that you don't know everything. in fact, it's normal to not know most things. plus, if you see friends who look like they know what they're doing a more than you feel you do, remember that everyone learns differently and it's okay if it's taking you a little longer to grasp how to write clinical objectives or SOAP notes or whatever else you're struggling with- you will get there. also, what may come relatively easily for you may be harder for those you're seeing. two words of advice via my clinical supervisors, because they are words that i know live by. 1) from my first clinical supervisor: "it's often more important for you to know what information you don't know than knowing what you do know-- that's how you learn." 2) from my second, when I admitted to her that I didn't know how help my client with one language element which he was struggling with about a six weeks into the semester: "Well, how could you know how to treat all the specifics of that?! You've only been focusing on it for the past six weeks! You think anyone has a full grasp on anything after six weeks? Look at what you have learned during that time; that's pretty incredible." 
    I will probably have imposter syndrome for the rest of my life (it's pretty much the SLP curse, let's be real) but i will always have those words to come back to. because you will struggle. there will be things that are hard for you. but it's okay if you don't know all the information or you feel like you're muddling through your intervention sessions for a bit. that's normal. it's okay. and you will get there.  
  3. Upvote
    samiamslp got a reaction from slptobe! in Graduate School Tips   
    the most important thing for me: it's okay that you don't know everything. in fact, it's okay if it feels like forever since you've looked at your phonetics work or your memory of anatomy and physiology is a bit spotty. first of all, you will get plenty of review in all that stuff in grad school. second of all, if you're feeling like you must be the only one who doesn't know things, always remember that you're not! everyone is in the same boat at the beginning. and, as the semester continues, if you're in clinic or in classes and feeling a little bit (or a lot bit) lost and overwhelmed, it's still okay that you don't know everything. in fact, it's normal to not know most things. plus, if you see friends who look like they know what they're doing a more than you feel you do, remember that everyone learns differently and it's okay if it's taking you a little longer to grasp how to write clinical objectives or SOAP notes or whatever else you're struggling with- you will get there. also, what may come relatively easily for you may be harder for those you're seeing. two words of advice via my clinical supervisors, because they are words that i know live by. 1) from my first clinical supervisor: "it's often more important for you to know what information you don't know than knowing what you do know-- that's how you learn." 2) from my second, when I admitted to her that I didn't know how help my client with one language element which he was struggling with about a six weeks into the semester: "Well, how could you know how to treat all the specifics of that?! You've only been focusing on it for the past six weeks! You think anyone has a full grasp on anything after six weeks? Look at what you have learned during that time; that's pretty incredible." 
    I will probably have imposter syndrome for the rest of my life (it's pretty much the SLP curse, let's be real) but i will always have those words to come back to. because you will struggle. there will be things that are hard for you. but it's okay if you don't know all the information or you feel like you're muddling through your intervention sessions for a bit. that's normal. it's okay. and you will get there.  
  4. Upvote
    samiamslp got a reaction from LaceySpeechie in Graduate School Tips   
    the most important thing for me: it's okay that you don't know everything. in fact, it's okay if it feels like forever since you've looked at your phonetics work or your memory of anatomy and physiology is a bit spotty. first of all, you will get plenty of review in all that stuff in grad school. second of all, if you're feeling like you must be the only one who doesn't know things, always remember that you're not! everyone is in the same boat at the beginning. and, as the semester continues, if you're in clinic or in classes and feeling a little bit (or a lot bit) lost and overwhelmed, it's still okay that you don't know everything. in fact, it's normal to not know most things. plus, if you see friends who look like they know what they're doing a more than you feel you do, remember that everyone learns differently and it's okay if it's taking you a little longer to grasp how to write clinical objectives or SOAP notes or whatever else you're struggling with- you will get there. also, what may come relatively easily for you may be harder for those you're seeing. two words of advice via my clinical supervisors, because they are words that i know live by. 1) from my first clinical supervisor: "it's often more important for you to know what information you don't know than knowing what you do know-- that's how you learn." 2) from my second, when I admitted to her that I didn't know how help my client with one language element which he was struggling with about a six weeks into the semester: "Well, how could you know how to treat all the specifics of that?! You've only been focusing on it for the past six weeks! You think anyone has a full grasp on anything after six weeks? Look at what you have learned during that time; that's pretty incredible." 
    I will probably have imposter syndrome for the rest of my life (it's pretty much the SLP curse, let's be real) but i will always have those words to come back to. because you will struggle. there will be things that are hard for you. but it's okay if you don't know all the information or you feel like you're muddling through your intervention sessions for a bit. that's normal. it's okay. and you will get there.  
  5. Upvote
    samiamslp got a reaction from AlwaysaFalcon in Graduate School Tips   
    the most important thing for me: it's okay that you don't know everything. in fact, it's okay if it feels like forever since you've looked at your phonetics work or your memory of anatomy and physiology is a bit spotty. first of all, you will get plenty of review in all that stuff in grad school. second of all, if you're feeling like you must be the only one who doesn't know things, always remember that you're not! everyone is in the same boat at the beginning. and, as the semester continues, if you're in clinic or in classes and feeling a little bit (or a lot bit) lost and overwhelmed, it's still okay that you don't know everything. in fact, it's normal to not know most things. plus, if you see friends who look like they know what they're doing a more than you feel you do, remember that everyone learns differently and it's okay if it's taking you a little longer to grasp how to write clinical objectives or SOAP notes or whatever else you're struggling with- you will get there. also, what may come relatively easily for you may be harder for those you're seeing. two words of advice via my clinical supervisors, because they are words that i know live by. 1) from my first clinical supervisor: "it's often more important for you to know what information you don't know than knowing what you do know-- that's how you learn." 2) from my second, when I admitted to her that I didn't know how help my client with one language element which he was struggling with about a six weeks into the semester: "Well, how could you know how to treat all the specifics of that?! You've only been focusing on it for the past six weeks! You think anyone has a full grasp on anything after six weeks? Look at what you have learned during that time; that's pretty incredible." 
    I will probably have imposter syndrome for the rest of my life (it's pretty much the SLP curse, let's be real) but i will always have those words to come back to. because you will struggle. there will be things that are hard for you. but it's okay if you don't know all the information or you feel like you're muddling through your intervention sessions for a bit. that's normal. it's okay. and you will get there.  
  6. Like
    samiamslp reacted to SLP☀️ in Imposter Syndrome / Post Acceptance Anxiety   
    I’m in my third semester of grad school and still have imposter syndrome. Instead of fake it til you make it I read something that said “act as if” which I thought was pretty positive and cool. Act as if. Who the hell is to say you’re an imposter girl. You’re a future SLP - solid definition of it  way to go!
  7. Like
    samiamslp reacted to SLPhopefullyy in Wait-listed Applicants   
    Update: I was also placed on the wait-list for a 3rd school! Of these 3, I recently found out that I was accepted into 1!!! I'M GOING TO GRAD SCHOOL!!!!! 
  8. Upvote
    samiamslp got a reaction from mcoa1996 in Favorite Rejection Quotes from the Results Page   
    If ya'll are wondering what I'll be doing next Friday at this time.. 
     
    I mean, it'll be reruns of Brooklyn Nine-Nine instead of Golden Girls, and there better be a boatload of ice cream involved, but. I relate. 
    Just @ me next time, friends. 

  9. Like
    samiamslp got a reaction from jujubea in Favorite Rejection Quotes from the Results Page   
    😭😭 Poor dude. There's no place like home?
    University Of Toronto Computer Science, Masters (F19) Rejected via E-mail on 29 Mar 2019 I 29 Mar 2019 report spam Rejections from CMU, UIUC, UBC, UTA and now UoT. Only 3 colleges left. Decided to go big or go home. Home appears likely.
  10. Upvote
    samiamslp reacted to MadisonMachelle in Factors in my decision- what is important?   
    Hi! I feel you 100% I spent a long time looking into the same questions and this is what I got:
    For #1 The amount of clinical placements will make you look better for jobs, but not THAT much more appealing considering everyone does between 2-4 anyways. The main benefit of doing more clinical placements is that if they are in a hospital/school/private practice you can get job offers through them. 
    For #2 I've heard from SLP's that I've mentored with that the reason it doesn't matter about the ranking is that its an in-demand field so as long as you are qualified with your CCC's and went to an ASHA accredited school, you'll get a job. I've noticed that getting a good CFY or externship depends on if the school has good connections with nearby providers. Again, if you get a good CFY/externship/clinical placement you have a better shot at getting a good job. With that being said, you can still get a job without having extraordinary experience during grad school. You'll just develop your repertoire after grad school. 
    #3, specializations or emphases will make you more marketable for jobs and can be used for leverage when you are negotiating your salary. For example, a specialization in autism, AAC, bilingualism, and multiculturalism, etc. is in demand and can be grounds for a pay raise or a reason for you to be hired over another candidate for a job. 
     
    Stay safe and good luck!
  11. Like
    samiamslp got a reaction from clemsontiger in Help for a Hopeful SLP   
    Definitely consider the University of Memphis! I've heard great things about it for people without a CSD background and for GAships/affordability. 
  12. Like
    samiamslp reacted to futurespeechpath1 in Accepting admission before hearing from other schools because of their late deadline?   
    Yeah I'm definitely going to feel bad doing that if I get in off the waitlist to one of the schools I wanted to attend. But I'm trying to think of the positives:
    1. You aren't the first or last person to do this
    2. Someone on the waitlist who might not have gotten in anywhere will be super excited to have gotten in
    3. It'll make you happy in the end
  13. Like
    samiamslp reacted to BioCook in MGH Institute of Health Professions   
    I'm a current first year at IHP too (HELLO @musicalmini) and I'm interested in joining that group!
  14. Like
    samiamslp reacted to musicalmini in MGH Institute of Health Professions   
    Hello all!
    My name is Megan. I'm currently a 1st year student at MGH-IHP and I work for the Office of Enrollment Services. With COVID-19 affecting schools around the nation, including ours, we've been challenged to be a little more creative than usual. To that end, I've been asked to create "Why IHP?" resources. I already have a few ideas influenced by how I picked my attendance at the IHP, but I'd love to hear what you have to say! What questions do you have about MGH IHP? Are there questions you have that are making settling on one school difficult? Ask me anything! Help me help you  Wishing you all the best with this process ❤️
     
  15. Like
    samiamslp got a reaction from mcoa1996 in Favorite Rejection Quotes from the Results Page   
    Carnegie Mellon University Computer Science, PhD (F20) Rejected via Phone on 10 Mar 2020 ♦ I 10 Mar 2020 5 papers leading author. Solved ENIGMA during WW2. Fought the Nazis bare handed.
  16. Upvote
    samiamslp reacted to BioCook in Current grad students: has your university closed down due to Coronavirus and what about clinical hours???   
    MGH IHP is transitioning into online courses for the rest of the spring semester. We are currently on spring break and we just got word that our client sessions at the in-house clinic will be cancelled next week. No word on what it will look like for the rest of the semester for sessions, but I can only imagine that even if the school decides to reopen the clinic, it will ultimately become the family’s decisions. I know it really is a bummer especially for our clinic hours...
  17. Like
    samiamslp got a reaction from kohntarkosz in Favorite Rejection Quotes from the Results Page   
    Carnegie Mellon University Computer Science, PhD (F20) Rejected via Phone on 10 Mar 2020 ♦ I 10 Mar 2020 5 papers leading author. Solved ENIGMA during WW2. Fought the Nazis bare handed.
  18. Like
    samiamslp got a reaction from bibliophile222 in Favorite Rejection Quotes from the Results Page   
    Carnegie Mellon University Computer Science, PhD (F20) Rejected via Phone on 10 Mar 2020 ♦ I 10 Mar 2020 5 papers leading author. Solved ENIGMA during WW2. Fought the Nazis bare handed.
  19. Like
    samiamslp got a reaction from Masters@GeorgiaTech in Favorite Rejection Quotes from the Results Page   
    Carnegie Mellon University Computer Science, PhD (F20) Rejected via Phone on 10 Mar 2020 ♦ I 10 Mar 2020 5 papers leading author. Solved ENIGMA during WW2. Fought the Nazis bare handed.
  20. Like
    samiamslp reacted to bibliophile222 in Share your victories!   
    I'm in my last semester of grad school and way past the point of applying, but I had a great week that's worth sharing: I took the Praxis, got my 375th clinical hour, and set up an appointment to fill out hiring paperwork for a long-term SLP sub position that will run from May to mid-June. It's been a looong time coming, but there is finally a light at the end of the tunnel! 
  21. Upvote
    samiamslp reacted to BioCook in Help choosing- BU, MGH, UPitt, Northwestern ???   
    There are a few people in our cohort who live together and it works out fine for them! I think we have a mix of interests, but honestly the majority of people in my class come into grad school with no specific populations they want to work with (I really know of maybe two people who are interesting in swallowing disorders). Also, don’t count on getting medical placements and/or placements at specific sites you really want! The only time a medical placement is guaranteed is if you take the medical concentration. But that should not be the only reason you go for a concentration!
  22. Upvote
    samiamslp reacted to BioCook in Help choosing- BU, MGH, UPitt, Northwestern ???   
    Hi! I'm at my second semester at IHP. I was choosing between BU and IHP (and some other schools) when I was making my final decision last year. I ultimately decided on IHP because of the focus on interprofessional education, the option for a medical concentration, and to expand my professional network. Anyway, I have some answers to your questions!
    Some people opt to live in Charlestown, which is very close to school (can be a 10-15 minute walk depending on where you are) and others commute in. I take the T into North Station, which is about a 10-15 minute walk to campus depending on which building I have to go to. If you time it correctly, there is also the Partners shuttle that cycles between MGH (the hospital) and the Navy Yard (where IHP is) and those run early/late (convenient for the evening classes). I haven't run into any issues with my commute tbh. My commute is about an hour from when I leave my place to when I get to school. 
     
    The first semester is pediatric-heavy, but you start getting into adult stuff in the second semester. I started grad school really wanting to do adult stuff, so I just had to push through the first semester and remind myself that it's better to get the ped stuff out of the way haha (the classes/professors were fun in the first semester!). In terms of CFs, I don't think it actually makes it "harder" to get one because of the extra semester. I believe you don't have to start your CF as soon as you graduate. It's just like applying for a job - you can do it any time.
  23. Upvote
    samiamslp reacted to bibliophile222 in Boston Schools 2020   
    I'm finishing up my last semester of grad school (not at BU) and just had to smile at this. Not to scare you or anything, but stressed out and tired is the name of the game in grad school! I wouldn't say it reflects negatively on BU. 
  24. Like
    samiamslp got a reaction from ur.future.therapist in Favorite Rejection Quotes from the Results Page   
    I think my favorites are the song lyric-based ones. I have been inspired to make a playlist. 
     

  25. Like
    samiamslp reacted to BioCook in MGH IHP?   
    I second @musicalmini’s response. IHP does a great job with looking at students/applicants as a whole. There are many ways you can make a rockstar application that don’t involve numbers. Good luck!
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