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snorkles

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  1. Like
    snorkles got a reaction from letsgetgaslit in Waitlist/Movement thread Fall 2021   
    This was me. I went 0/7 first cycle and 6/10 my second. It's a frustrating reality that presentation counts for so much. As much as I want to believe the quality of my thinking developed between cycles, it was mostly just how I presented my ideas that mattered. 
  2. Like
    snorkles reacted to Emailchecker in Waitlist/Movement thread Fall 2021   
    Guys!!! I am in at UT-Austin!!!I cannot CANNOT CANNOT believe
  3. Upvote
    snorkles got a reaction from onerepublic96 in Waitlist/Movement thread Fall 2021   
    This was me. I went 0/7 first cycle and 6/10 my second. It's a frustrating reality that presentation counts for so much. As much as I want to believe the quality of my thinking developed between cycles, it was mostly just how I presented my ideas that mattered. 
  4. Like
    snorkles got a reaction from gloryous in 2021 Applicants   
    I'm thinking of a pretty capacious definition. Access to resources is one way to think about it. For me that means anything from spheres of knowledge, opportunities, guidance. Take admissions for example: Many people have mentors helping to shape their application. Some people have been guided on this path since high school. 
  5. Like
    snorkles got a reaction from j.j.pizza in 2021 Applicants   
    I'm thinking of a pretty capacious definition. Access to resources is one way to think about it. For me that means anything from spheres of knowledge, opportunities, guidance. Take admissions for example: Many people have mentors helping to shape their application. Some people have been guided on this path since high school. 
  6. Like
    snorkles got a reaction from harleth in 2021 Applicants   
    I'm thinking of a pretty capacious definition. Access to resources is one way to think about it. For me that means anything from spheres of knowledge, opportunities, guidance. Take admissions for example: Many people have mentors helping to shape their application. Some people have been guided on this path since high school. 
  7. Upvote
    snorkles got a reaction from semiotic_mess in 2021 Applicants   
    As a nontraditional student, I'm learning more and more about the depth of access privilege. It doesn't end with admissions. 
  8. Like
    snorkles got a reaction from NervousYolk in 2021 Applicants   
    I'm thinking of a pretty capacious definition. Access to resources is one way to think about it. For me that means anything from spheres of knowledge, opportunities, guidance. Take admissions for example: Many people have mentors helping to shape their application. Some people have been guided on this path since high school. 
  9. Like
    snorkles got a reaction from Hard times! in 2021 Applicants   
    I'm thinking of a pretty capacious definition. Access to resources is one way to think about it. For me that means anything from spheres of knowledge, opportunities, guidance. Take admissions for example: Many people have mentors helping to shape their application. Some people have been guided on this path since high school. 
  10. Like
    snorkles got a reaction from R Westy in 2021 Applicants   
    I'm thinking of a pretty capacious definition. Access to resources is one way to think about it. For me that means anything from spheres of knowledge, opportunities, guidance. Take admissions for example: Many people have mentors helping to shape their application. Some people have been guided on this path since high school. 
  11. Upvote
    snorkles got a reaction from MichelleObama in 2021 Applicants   
    As a nontraditional student, I'm learning more and more about the depth of access privilege. It doesn't end with admissions. 
  12. Upvote
    snorkles got a reaction from caitlin_flawed in 2021 Applicants   
    As a nontraditional student, I'm learning more and more about the depth of access privilege. It doesn't end with admissions. 
  13. Like
    snorkles got a reaction from ghost-enthusiast in 2021 Applicants   
    As a nontraditional student, I'm learning more and more about the depth of access privilege. It doesn't end with admissions. 
  14. Upvote
    snorkles got a reaction from jjmcgu19 in 2021 Applicants   
    As a nontraditional student, I'm learning more and more about the depth of access privilege. It doesn't end with admissions. 
  15. Like
    snorkles got a reaction from Hard times! in 2021 Applicants   
    As a nontraditional student, I'm learning more and more about the depth of access privilege. It doesn't end with admissions. 
  16. Like
    snorkles reacted to vivodito in programs suspending admission fall 21   
    Hi,
    I wanted to add a little perspective as a current PhD candidate at an ivy currently organizing to pressure my department to follow Yale and Chicago in suspending admissions for Fall 2021. The response of most programs to the disruptions presented by the pandemic has been atrocious. PhD students of all disciplines find themselves looking at what amounts to a year loss of progress towards degree--many students have had to abandon research in the US and abroad, obviously library access has been severely limited. Hiring freezes set in pretty quickly after the pandemic's outset, so the class of students meant to defend this year have had to drum up funding to keep themselves afloat, with no guarantee that any kind of job market will exist next year.
    At my institution, after a flurry of action largely organized by our student union in the Spring,  university admin made it clear that the only way departments could issue a blanket funding extension for current grads would be to forgo future admits. Every slot canceled frees up 10 semesters of funding to be redistributed among current students. I imagine the decisions at Yale and Chicago were made under similar conditions. This is a form of austerity, and all evidence points to it getting worse, not better in upper ed, with, as usual, outsize effect on the humanities.
    I think its quite easy to focus on "how" to get into grad school rather than "why" to go to grad school (which this forum obviously abets). Now more than ever I would urge all prospective PhD applicants to REALLY think deeply about the latter. To be able to ask yourself and answer honestly: am I emotionally, mentally, and financially capable of putting 5-7 years of work into a career path that most likely will not lead to employment in my field?
    Towards answering this latter question and getting a better idea of the wrecked landscape that is graduate work in the humanities currently I highly recommend perusing discussions on the Chronicle of Higher Education such as: https://www.chronicle.com/article/how-the-coronavirus-will-or-should-transform-graduate-education/
    and also discussions on Karen Kelsky's website: http://theprofessorisin.com/ 
    (her 2015 book "The Professor is In" remains a really useful read)
     
  17. Upvote
    snorkles got a reaction from merry night wanderer in Preparing for PhD program entry in a couple of years   
    To preface my advice, I'd like to mention that programs in general are admitting smaller cohorts this year. I wouldn't be surprised if this trend continued beyond 2021. If you're thinking about PhD programs with the job market in mind, you'd be better served by focusing your efforts elsewhere. It was already near impossible to land a tenure track position. Now, things are looking very, very bleak. 
    The best thing you can do is refine your interests and develop questions about them. You aren't expected to be an expert in a field when you apply, but you should be somewhat conversant with one. Write a good (that is, relevant to your field) thesis and use it for your writing sample. 
    Conferences and publications don't hurt your application, but they take time. The same is true for library work and volunteering. In my opinion, you're better off spending your time researching and writing. Develop relationships with faculty to help you along. 
    The application process is expensive and grueling. I'd heavily consider whether you want to pursue this route, because a lot of the labor that goes into making yourself an ideal PhD applicant may also prevent you from developing your marketability in other avenues. 
  18. Upvote
    snorkles got a reaction from Glasperlenspieler in Preparing for PhD program entry in a couple of years   
    To preface my advice, I'd like to mention that programs in general are admitting smaller cohorts this year. I wouldn't be surprised if this trend continued beyond 2021. If you're thinking about PhD programs with the job market in mind, you'd be better served by focusing your efforts elsewhere. It was already near impossible to land a tenure track position. Now, things are looking very, very bleak. 
    The best thing you can do is refine your interests and develop questions about them. You aren't expected to be an expert in a field when you apply, but you should be somewhat conversant with one. Write a good (that is, relevant to your field) thesis and use it for your writing sample. 
    Conferences and publications don't hurt your application, but they take time. The same is true for library work and volunteering. In my opinion, you're better off spending your time researching and writing. Develop relationships with faculty to help you along. 
    The application process is expensive and grueling. I'd heavily consider whether you want to pursue this route, because a lot of the labor that goes into making yourself an ideal PhD applicant may also prevent you from developing your marketability in other avenues. 
  19. Like
    snorkles got a reaction from MichelleObama in How "vocal" should you be on political matters as a grad student?   
    Get a feel for the culture of the department and decide from there. I suspect your department doesn't have a student union (recognized or otherwise), but if it does then I'd go there first. 
  20. Upvote
    snorkles got a reaction from onerepublic96 in Starting the slow climb to a comp lit PhD. Tips for the journey?   
    You seem to be focused on boosting your CV, which is insignificant at this stage relative to the time investment. Publishing in itself isn't noteworthy. It's the work that matters, where a published paper is a sign of good work. Keeping in mind, too, that not all journals are equal. Publishing is not a prerequisite for graduate school. I haven't published anything. I would work on refining your interests and developing faculty relationships. And keep honing your writing. Also, do lots and lots of research on the state of the field and its future. Are you comfortable with 6-10 years of work without a job waiting for you at the other end? The work itself has to be enough to sustain you. Another question you might think about is whether an MA is the best route, or if you'd be better off applying straight to PhD programs. 
  21. Upvote
    snorkles got a reaction from cruel optimism in 2021 Applicants   
    I'd also like to emphasize how dire things are. Everything is indeed in flux right now, but I've heard rumblings of even more severe measures. This is to say, I would not wait for the 2022 cycle to apply. And only apply with the expectation that you will not land a tenured position at the other end (not that this is news). 
  22. Upvote
    snorkles got a reaction from Bopie5 in 2021 Applicants   
    I'd also like to emphasize how dire things are. Everything is indeed in flux right now, but I've heard rumblings of even more severe measures. This is to say, I would not wait for the 2022 cycle to apply. And only apply with the expectation that you will not land a tenured position at the other end (not that this is news). 
  23. Upvote
    snorkles got a reaction from merry night wanderer in 2021 Applicants   
    I'd also like to emphasize how dire things are. Everything is indeed in flux right now, but I've heard rumblings of even more severe measures. This is to say, I would not wait for the 2022 cycle to apply. And only apply with the expectation that you will not land a tenured position at the other end (not that this is news). 
  24. Like
    snorkles got a reaction from karamazov in 2020 Applicants   
    I like this a lot. I had something longer written out in response, but I decided it was a bit of a bummer. In short, I've learned in my first year the truism that one should not compare oneself to one's peers is crucial for one's mental health in graduate school. Setting your own metrics for success is important, especially for those coming from nontraditional backgrounds. 
     
     
     
  25. Upvote
    snorkles got a reaction from killerbunny in 2020 Applicants   
    I like this a lot. I had something longer written out in response, but I decided it was a bit of a bummer. In short, I've learned in my first year the truism that one should not compare oneself to one's peers is crucial for one's mental health in graduate school. Setting your own metrics for success is important, especially for those coming from nontraditional backgrounds. 
     
     
     
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