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Fantasmapocalypse

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  1. Upvote
    Fantasmapocalypse got a reaction from zoo7 in Writing Sample- Same writing sample to all Universities?   
    Your writing sample should be your most polished piece of work, preferably something presented at a conference and/or peer-reviewed or published, even if it is in conference proceedings. Barring that, I would go with your strongest paper (perhaps a senior thesis if undergrad, MA thesis or capstone, etc) that connects the most with your program(s) of choice and/or highlights your specialization and skills. So if you are writing for a program with faculty who specialize in gender, select something in that area. If you are writing about popular culture and nationalism, you could potentially frame that in your SOP for departments focused on media, youth culture, nationalism, popular culture, etc. Your sample is just that, a sample. IMO I would probably take your strongest work and submit it as last graded or as published. If you have revisions from a trusted advisor's input, then go for that. However, I think your writing sample is less important then showing in your SOP how your previous work connects to the department and your current plans. Search committees and admit committees will probably not read and entire sample, so it can be risky trying to tweak a 20, 30, 40, etc page paper at the cost of your letters of rec and SOP. IMO your SOP is your campaign platform and sales pitch. It is written for that program, or should mostly be original and written specifically for them.
  2. Like
    Fantasmapocalypse reacted to dillwithit in Should I retake GRE for AWA?   
    I wouldn't retake it. Just be sure to include a writing sample as some schools use the AWA as the sole writing sample. The majority of schools in anthro focus on V and Q scores anyway.
  3. Upvote
    Fantasmapocalypse reacted to archaeologysam in Fall 2019 Applicants   
    I know this thread is just about dead but I wanted to give a final update on my experience with applying to graduate school. I applied to six departments in Classics and Anthropology. I applied to FSU's masters in Classical Archaeology and their masters in Anthropology, to UWF's masters in Underwater Archaeology, ECU's masters in Maritime Studies, UCLA's Cotsen Institutes interdisciplinary PhD, and UConn's PhD in Anthropology. I was accepted to both of FSU's programs, ECU, and UConn. All of these programs offered me funding. It's worth noting that ECU's funding offer was exceptionally poor however. I received an official rejection from UCLA and never heard anything from UWF officially but when I reached out to my POI I was told that they had filled all of their positions for the Fall. I have accepted the position at UConn and am very excited to start in the Fall. 
  4. Upvote
    Fantasmapocalypse got a reaction from NeilM in Giving students the answers - Ethical Dilemma   
    Document it, speak to your chair or department head, see if other students/classes have document these same issues. Do not give out the answers. You are not the instructor of record.MIT is not worth your job or career.
    That aside I am uncomfortable with faculty who have vague and subjective grading systems. Look for rubrics, anything your department might have for the course.
  5. Upvote
    Fantasmapocalypse got a reaction from Tako in Funding for MA programs in international studies   
    Find out if your university currently offers any campus wide fellowships, scholarships, etc. Once you establish your dissertation's general themes and develop a central thesis, I would start marketing it to various fellowships, grants, and other organizations that might share a mutual interest. For example, if you are looking at Islam in Japan and tourism, I would approach or examine JETRO, MOFA, and other organizations such as travel agencies or the like that have a vested interest in your research if you can spin it to helping them better understand how/why foreigners from SE Asia and other Muslim communities come/don't come to Japan and how they can better improve their experiences. Market your materials to those with money.
    Take any opportunity to find conferences with student paper competitions and the like that you can attend or at least submit to. Winning prizes gives you exposure and recognition, which can contribute to lines on your CV. Demonstrate you 1.) produce relevant research and 2.) get money for it. A $500 student paper competition win can help you get that $1000 campus grant, which leads to a regional $5000 expense stipend from an agency to tens of thousands of dollars in other grants, etc.
    If all else fails, seek out teaching opportunities that offer tuition remission in addition to pay. I know you already have an out-of-state waiver, but teaching at your local junior college or community college on the side helps you network and gives you more income. Use the opportunity to develop your own lessons and research, bring in your own research and teach it in segment of the curriculum, etc.
  6. Like
    Fantasmapocalypse got a reaction from VirtualCell in Low Undergrad GPA Stanford PhD program Possible?   
    I hope it helps! I've found The Professor Is In by Karen Kelsky to be extremely helpful. She also runs a blog, which you can google and find a lot of free advice there. While she has experience as an R1 program chair/department head, it is in the social sciences, so you will want to check with a trusted person in your field for some verification on specifics. However, I think she has some superb advice in general about writing compelling and concise documents.
  7. Upvote
    Fantasmapocalypse reacted to SarahReed in Submit CV instead of resume?   
    CV is used primarily when applying for international, academic, education, scientific or research positions or when applying for fellowships or grants. For most other jobs, a resume is the convention.
  8. Upvote
    Fantasmapocalypse got a reaction from BioCook in Commuting to grad school?   
    I spent a significant amount of time commuting to my MA program. My partner and I share a vehicle, so on class days I would take them to work and then commute approximately 2 hrs to school, give or take an hour for traffic and finding a parking spot. It was exhausting, TAing and holding office hours and going to seminar. I regularly got home around 1am after driving back to pick up my partner. My program was designed for 'professionals' so it was only three hour seminars twice a week, but 3 years of that was murder. You should seriously consider how much commuting will impact your day, your energy, your study time, etc.
    time isn't just money it is energy and sanity imo...
  9. Like
    Fantasmapocalypse got a reaction from Rezzy S. in Commuting to grad school?   
    I spent a significant amount of time commuting to my MA program. My partner and I share a vehicle, so on class days I would take them to work and then commute approximately 2 hrs to school, give or take an hour for traffic and finding a parking spot. It was exhausting, TAing and holding office hours and going to seminar. I regularly got home around 1am after driving back to pick up my partner. My program was designed for 'professionals' so it was only three hour seminars twice a week, but 3 years of that was murder. You should seriously consider how much commuting will impact your day, your energy, your study time, etc.
    time isn't just money it is energy and sanity imo...
  10. Upvote
    Fantasmapocalypse got a reaction from bibliophile222 in Commuting to grad school?   
    I spent a significant amount of time commuting to my MA program. My partner and I share a vehicle, so on class days I would take them to work and then commute approximately 2 hrs to school, give or take an hour for traffic and finding a parking spot. It was exhausting, TAing and holding office hours and going to seminar. I regularly got home around 1am after driving back to pick up my partner. My program was designed for 'professionals' so it was only three hour seminars twice a week, but 3 years of that was murder. You should seriously consider how much commuting will impact your day, your energy, your study time, etc.
    time isn't just money it is energy and sanity imo...
  11. Upvote
    Fantasmapocalypse reacted to dancedementia in How much does prestige matter? School Psych PsyD   
    You're not wrong. There is some connection between high prestige and a good quality program, but I don't necessarily think that the opposite is true (e.g. just because a program is not considered "prestigious" doesn't mean you'll get a poor quality experience). That said, I'd like to remind everyone of the lovely Pareto principle (where are my I/O folks when I need them) - 80% of results comes from 20% of the effort. Put simply in the context of a doctoral program (with the intent to practice) - all you need is "enough". You need your 2-3 years of practicum, your 1 year of APA internship, your 1 year of postdoc (or whatever postgrad hours are needed to get licensed in your state). The difference between a person who publishes 5 papers vs. the person who publishes 1 is practically negligible when it comes to hiring for practice. It doesn't matter if your lab was ranked 1st or ranked 30th - you got the research experience and the dissertation nonetheless. (If we're talking about a career in academia, all of this goes out the window, of course.) Keep in mind that everyone who finishes a program and passes the EPPP (not sure if school psych has another exam, I don't know the name) gets licensed. EVERYONE. Doesn't matter if you graduated from Harvard or from Oklahoma State. And as the years go on, if your intent is to stay in clinical practice, your education slowly becomes less and less important as you advance.
    It's inaccurate to say that prestige doesn't matter at all - because let's face it, we're human beings and there is an inherent to signal and to seek out signalling in others. However, I think that as you go deeper and deeper into clinical practice you'll learn that there are diminishing returns.
    You'll be in this program for 4 years. That's actually a pretty long time. Pick the one that you feel comfortable in 
    I think you underestimate the capability of hiring folks, haha. If anything, I think their lack of expertise actually works in your favour in the context of clinical practice. As I mentioned before, I don't have the time or the care to look at university names, lab names, PI names. I skim the resume and look for a job that looks similar to the one I'm hiring for. I'm hiring for a "school psychologist"? Well, better make sure this person mentions schools and psychology somewhere in their resume. You'll also find that a lot of the "first cut" goes through automatic keyword screeners first, and those automated programs definitely don't care what school you went to - they just want to know whether your degree matches and whether you have the license haha.
    As for administrators, bureaucrats, and the public, you have a point. Although that could work either for or against you. For example, in my field (eating disorders), here are some of the top schools: Drexel, Temple, Miami, FSU,  SUNY Albany, Michigan State. Here are some of the NOT top schools: Harvard, Yale, Columbia. So if you went to Drexel - great for hiring, sucks for public perception. If you went to Yale - sucks for hiring, great for public perception. At that point it's kind of a "pick your battle" - do you want to be well known in the inner circle of eating disorders, or do you want to signal to the public that you went to a prestigious school? Someone hiring at an ED treatment facility may be "in the know", but someone hiring at a community mental health agency may have no idea.
    As a P. S. -- I don't intend to give any "do this or die" advice in my replies, I'm just sharing some n=1 anecdotes in hopes that it sparks some conversation. Thanks
  12. Upvote
    Fantasmapocalypse reacted to phyanth in Trying to find grad schools to apply to?   
    After many years of being on here, I've noticed iterations of this question every season! For those of you starting your search, you may find this helpful
    https://anthroacademic.wordpress.com/2019/03/14/__trashed/
     
  13. Upvote
    Fantasmapocalypse reacted to paraent in How much does prestige matter? School Psych PsyD   
    A recent study I read found that, controlling for everything else, prestige matters about twice as much as gender. Think about how much you think it matters for your career that you're a man rather than a woman, or vice versa. Prestige matters about twice as much as that. 
  14. Upvote
    Fantasmapocalypse reacted to PsyDuck90 in How much does prestige matter? School Psych PsyD   
    First, try to arrange a visit to School B. Hating something in high school is so different than looking at a program now as an adult. Visit and then see if that helps to make your choice easier. If you still hate it, then there's your answer. 
    Also, I'm confused how the research-oriented project is not a dissertation, but the practice-oriented one is. A dissertation is traditionally a research-oriented document. Granted I don't know much about school psych, but several school psych people in my area are in the same practicums as clinical psych folks. 
  15. Like
    Fantasmapocalypse got a reaction from perpetualalligator in Disorganized department?   
    No funding, loosely aligned faculty and/or a program as opposed to a proper department are also red flags.... 

  16. Upvote
    Fantasmapocalypse reacted to oroanthro in To Go or Not to Go? New Public R1 - But No Funding for Incoming Students   
    That's what I did too, and for much the same reasoning (older, limbo state, etc)  but still wish somebody had told me about the less obvious pains of unfunded-ness. Now, even though I'm upset, I'm focusing on being the best damn student I can be: always participating, submitting everything on time, engaging my professors outside the class, and working a ton of side gigs or money. That way, if/when I ask for letters of rec and support,  people will give them to me willingly.
    So whatever you do, however it makes you feel, just remember-- you are not alone in this situation! Best of luck, again, and my apologies for the unbridled wave of bitterness earlier.
  17. Upvote
    Fantasmapocalypse reacted to oroanthro in Disorganized department?   
    I think this is a huge red flag and points to more than disorganization. Sending emails out late, no clear leadership, having a messy office, etc--that's disorganization. A strained relationship with the administration? How are you supposed to get external funding or permission to host events? What if you need your department's assistance in working something out with the university? Also--How can the "content" of a program be a good fit apart from the people who constitute the program? If the older generation are being forced to retire and the newer faculty can't seem to find a way to stay? Are the faculty you want to work able to stay? Do you really want to commit to a program that may not be able to commit to your project?
  18. Upvote
    Fantasmapocalypse reacted to oroanthro in University of Hawaii Anthro vs Cornell Asian Studies   
    I agree with the poster above--Hawai'i is not a well known anthropology program. You should check out Karen Kelsky (the professor is in blog) and read about her experiences coming out of Hawai'i--it was pretty traumatic. The status of their program has not changed since she left. Also, if you intend to apply to PhD programs in anthropology, it helps to have letters of rec from anthropologists connected to the top anthropology programs.Most people do not stay in the same program from MA to PhD, so I don't think you have to worry about "ending up" in the same place for 5+ years. It's perfectly reasonable to leave for another program in the same university or another university altogether. 
    That being said, you need to think about your whole self. It sounds like you might actually want to move to Hawaii because they will fund you, you like the community around the university, it's Hawaii and it's beautiful, and you might be more inclined to stay for either a job or another PhD program in another field. Those are important factors! Ithaca is cold, it's isolated and while upstate NY is beautiful, it's not very diverse or welcoming. I could be reading into your post too much, but it sounds like you can't imagine making a home for yourself there. 
    What's more, as someone who has settled for an unfunded degree and deeply regrets it, I can say that funding matters. If you take the unfunded route, you will be paying a lot of money to basically fund the kids in the PhD program, get ignored by your faculty (who will focus on those PhD students) and at the end of it all, have to leave for elsewhere. Funding signifies a university's willingness to invest in you and your future. 
     
    Weigh out all your options carefully! Good luck with the decision!
  19. Upvote
    Fantasmapocalypse got a reaction from rheya19 in Giving students the answers - Ethical Dilemma   
    Document it, speak to your chair or department head, see if other students/classes have document these same issues. Do not give out the answers. You are not the instructor of record.MIT is not worth your job or career.
    That aside I am uncomfortable with faculty who have vague and subjective grading systems. Look for rubrics, anything your department might have for the course.
  20. Upvote
    Fantasmapocalypse got a reaction from manicape in Elitism in Anthropology   
    I think there are ways to change the system, but it will probably be initiated/maintained by people who wield the most/enough privilege to speak up and risk changing the power structures they are able to navigate/engage it. The other thing to consider is that academia is not just "the work of the mind", which should be seen as an altruistic/noble pursuit beyond the mundane world... but it is most certainly embedded in capitalism. Again, the problem is that these programs and the people in them are juggling their ideals with the realities of economics, cost of living, exploitation, the privatization of the very institutions that are supposed to be "above" such concerns. Problem is, they rely on those systems (endowments, funding, etc) to exist...
  21. Upvote
    Fantasmapocalypse reacted to Ternwild in Rejected from PhD program - won't tell me why.   
    @ApexLegend Before all of this, you need to clarify what this "complaint" is.  This "complaint" may be something you feel is unsubstantiated but depending on what it is, the program/board may be not interested in having any incidents in this program.  You need to clarify before I can even remotely take your side on this.  Everyone is the hero of their own story. 
  22. Upvote
    Fantasmapocalypse reacted to Sigaba in Is it possible that an admitted student recommend his/her partner/fiance?   
    Making such a recommendation would be extraordinarily bad form.
  23. Upvote
    Fantasmapocalypse got a reaction from pyramidstuds in Elitism in Anthropology   
    I think there are ways to change the system, but it will probably be initiated/maintained by people who wield the most/enough privilege to speak up and risk changing the power structures they are able to navigate/engage it. The other thing to consider is that academia is not just "the work of the mind", which should be seen as an altruistic/noble pursuit beyond the mundane world... but it is most certainly embedded in capitalism. Again, the problem is that these programs and the people in them are juggling their ideals with the realities of economics, cost of living, exploitation, the privatization of the very institutions that are supposed to be "above" such concerns. Problem is, they rely on those systems (endowments, funding, etc) to exist...
  24. Like
    Fantasmapocalypse got a reaction from Adelaide9216 in What CV format is a good one?   
    https://theprofessorisin.com/2016/08/19/dr-karens-rules-of-the-academic-cv/
    Dr. Karen’s Rules of the Academic CV
    Posted on August 19, 2016 by Karen Kelsky Reposting classics on the basic job market documents as we gear up for the 2016 job search!
    ~~~~~~~~
    Today’s post is a long overdue post on CVs. 
    While the CV genre permits a wide range of variation, and there is no consensus on the value or desirability of one particular style, I am going to present a list of expectations that govern my own work at The Professor Is In.
    These expectations will produce a highly-readable, well-organized CV on the American academic model. British and Canadian CV-writers will note that the font is larger, the length is greater, the margins wider, and the white spaces more abundant than you may be used to. These are the typical norms for American CVs (again, admitting of enormous variation among fields and individuals).  
    These norms govern the “paper” CVs that are submitted as elements of a job application. The CV can be created in a program like Word but submitted as a PDF to ensure proper formatting on the receiving end.
    These rules do not encompass online CVs, which may employ elements such as bullet points that I reject. 
    Candidates seeking work in the UK or Canada might want to consult with experts from those countries for opinions on whether this American model CV will work against candidates in searches there.
    Without further ado: Dr. Karen’s Rules of the CV.
    I.  General Formatting Rules
     
    One inch margins on all four sides.
    12 point font throughout
    Single spaced
    No switching of font sizes for any element, EXCEPT the candidate name at top, which can be in 14 or perhaps 16.
    Headings in bold and all caps.
    Subheadings in bold only.
    NO ITALICS OF ANY KIND EXCEPT FOR JOURNAL AND BOOK TITLES (Brits, I’m talking to you)
    One or two full returns (ie, blank lines) before each new heading.
    One return/blank line between each heading and its first entry.
    Left justify all elements of the cv.
    Do not full/right justify any element of the cv.
    No bullet points at all, ever, under any circumstances. This is not a resume.
    No “box” or column formatting of any kind. This interferes with the constant adjustments a dynamic professional CV will undergo on a weekly/monthly basis.
    No “XXXX, cont’d” headings. Page breaks will constantly move as CV grows.
    YEAR (but not month or day) OF EVERY ENTRY THROUGHOUT CV LEFT JUSTIFIED, with tabs or indent separating year from substance of entry. Why, you ask? Because candidates are evaluated by their productivity over time. Search and tenure committees wish to easily track yearly output. When you produce is as important as what you produce. Year must be visible, not buried in the entry itself.   (table formatting another option as described in comment stream)
    NO NARRATIVE VERBIAGE ANYWHERE. Brits, I’m talking to you.
    No description of “duties” under Teaching/Courses Taught
    No paragraphs describing books or articles.  
    No explanations of grants/fellowships (ie, “this is a highly competitive fellowship…”).
    No personal stories.
    No “My work at the U of XX is difficult to condense…” etc. etc.
    One possible exception: a separate heading for “Dissertation” with a VERY short paragraph abstract underneath. I disapprove of this. Some advisors insist on it. One year or so beyond completion, it should be removed.
     
    II.  Heading Material:
    Name at top, centered, in 14 or 16 point font.
    The words “Curriculum vitae” immediately underneath or above, centered, in 12 point font.  This is a traditional practice in the humanities and social sciences; it might be optional at this point in time, and in various fields.  Please doublecheck with a trusted advisor.
    The date, immediately below, centered, is optional.   Senior scholars always date their cvs.
    Your institutional and home addresses, tel, email, parallel right and left justified.
     
    III.  Content:
    1. Education. Always. No exceptions.  List by degree, not by institution.  Do not spell out Doctor of Philosophy, etc.; it’s pretentious.  List Ph.D., M.A., B.A. in descending order.  Give department, institution, and year of completion.  Do NOT give starting dates.  You may include Dissertation/Thesis Title, and perhaps Dissertation/Thesis Advisor if you are ABD or only 1 year or so from Ph.D.. Remove this after that point.  Do not include any other verbiage.  
    2. Professional Appointments/Employment. This must go immediately under education, assuming that you have/had these.  Why?  Because the reader must be able to instantly “place” you institutionally.  These are contract positions only– tenure track or instructorships.  Ad hoc adjunct gigs do not go here; only contracted positions of 1+ years in length.  Postdoctoral positions also go here.  Give institution, department, title, and dates (year only) of employment.  Be sure and reflect joint appointments if you have one.  ABD candidates may have no Professional Appointments, and in that case the Heading can be skipped.   TA-SHIPS, ETC. ARE NOT LISTED UNDER PROFESSIONAL EMPLOYMENT. COURSES THAT YOU TAUGHT AS AN ADJUNCT ARE NOT LISTED UNDER PROFESSIONAL APPOINTMENTS.
    3. Publications. Subheadings: Books, Edited Volumes, Refereed Journal Articles, Book Chapters, Conference Proceedings, Encyclopedia Entries, Book Reviews, Manuscripts in Submission (give journal title), Manuscripts in Preparation, Web-Based Publications, Other Publications (this section can include non-academic publications, within reason).  Please note that forthcoming publications ARE included in this section. If they are already in the printing stage, with the full citation and page numbers available, they may be listed the same as other published publications, at the very top since their dates are furthest in the future.  If they are in press, they can be listed here with “in press” in place of the year.
    4. Awards and Honors. Give name of award and institutional location. Year  at left. Always in reverse descending order. Listing $$ amount appears to be field-specific.  Check with a trusted senior advisor.
    5. Grants and Fellowships (if you are in a field where these differ categorically from Awards and Honors). Give funder, institutional location in which received/utilized, year span. Listing $$ amount appears to be field-specific.  Check with a trusted senior advisor. Year at left.
    6. Invited Talks. These are talks to which you have been invited at OTHER campuses, not your own. Give title, institutional location, and date. Year only (not month or day) at left.  Month and day of talk go into entries.
    7. Conference Activity/Participation. Subheadings: Panels Organized, Papers Presented, Discussant. These entries will include: Name of paper, name of conference, date. Year (Year only) on left as noted above. Month and date-range of conference in the entry itself (ie, March 22-25).  No extra words such as: “Paper title:”   Future conferences SHOULD be listed here, if you have had a paper or panel officially accepted.  The dates will be future dates, and as such they will be the first dates listed.
    7a.  Campus or Departmental Talks.  These are talks that you were asked to give in your own department or on your own campus. These do not rise to the level of an “Invited Talk” but still may be featured under the heading of Campus Talks or Departmental Talks.  List as you would Invited Talks.  Under no circumstances may guest lectures in courses be listed here or anywhere on the CV. That is padding.
    8. Teaching Experience. Subdivide either by area/field of teaching or by institutional location, or by Graduate/Undergraduate, or some combination of these as appropriate to your particular case. 
    ADDENDUM 9/18/13: Format in this way:  if you’ve taught at more than one institution, make subheadings for each institution.  Then list the courses vertically down the left (ie, do NOT use the year-to-left rule that applies everywhere else).  To the right of each course, in parentheses, give the terms and years taught. This allows you to show the number of times you’ve taught a course without listing it over and over.  Give course titles BUT NEVER GIVE COURSE NUMBERS! Course numbers are meaningless outside your campus.
    If your quantity of courses taught exceeds approximately 15, condense this section; it is not essential for a highly experience teacher to scrupulously list every single course taught, every single time.  Just cover your general range of competencies.
    TA experience goes here.  No narrative verbiage under any course title. No listing of “duties” or “responsibilities.”  There is one small exception to this rule, as noted in the comment stream (near comment #100).  If your department is one that has its “TAs” actually design and sole-teach courses, then this needs to be clarified.  Language to be added can include, “(Instructor of record)” after course title, or “(As TA I designed and sole-taught all courses listed here),” etc.  Keep it short and sweet.
    9.  Research Experience. RA experience goes here, as well as lab experience.  This is one location where slight elaboration is possible, if the research was a team effort on a complex, multi-year theme.  One detailed sentence should suffice.  
    10. Service To Profession. Include journal manuscript review work (with journal titles [mss. review CAN be given its own separate heading if you do a lot of this work]), leadership of professional organizations, etc. Some people put panel organizing under service; check conventions in your field.
    11. Departmental/University Service. Include search committees and other committee work, appointments to Faculty Senate, etc.  Sorry to be a pain, but here the convention is that the Title or Committee is left justified, with the year in the entry.  Don’t ask me why, and only a convention, not a strict rule.
    12. Extracurricular University Service. [Optional. ] Can include involvement in student groups, sporting clubs, etc.
    13. Community Involvement/Outreach. [Optional.]  This includes work with libraries and schools, public lectures, etc.
    14.  Media Coverage. [Optional.] Coverage of your work by the media.
    15.  Related Professional Skills. [Optional.] Can include training in GIS and other technical skills relevant to the discipline. More common in professional schools and science fields; uncommon in humanities.
    16. Non-Academic Work. [Optional—VERY optional!] Include only if relevant to your overall academic qualifications. More common in Business, sciences. Editorial and publishing work possibly relevant in English and the Humanities.  
    17.  Teaching Areas/Courses Prepared To Teach.  [Optional].  You can give a brief list of course titles (titles only!) that represent your areas of teaching preparation.  No more than 10 courses should be listed here.
    18. Languages. All languages to be listed vertically, with proficiency in reading, speaking, and writing clearly demarcated using terms such as: native, fluent, excellent, conversational, good, can read with dictionary, etc.
    19. Professional Memberships/Affiliations. All professional organizations of which you are a member listed vertically. Include years of joining when you are more senior and those years recede into the past—demonstrates length of commitment to a field.
    20. References. List references vertically. Give name and full title. Do not refer to references as “Dr. xxx,” or “Professor xxx.” This makes you look like a graduate student. Give full snail mail contact information along with tel and email. To do otherwise is amateurish, even though we know nobody is going to use the snail mail address. Do not give narrative verbiage or explanation of these references (ie, “Ph.D. Committee member,” etc.). The only exception is a single reference that may be identified as “Teaching Reference.” This would be the fourth of four references.
     
    IV.  Principle of Peer Review.  
    The organizing principle of the CV is prioritizing peer review and competitiveness. Professional appointments are extremely competitive, and go first. Publications are highly competitive, and go second, with peer reviewed publications taking place of honor. Awards and honors reveal high levels of competition, as do fellowships and grants. Invited talks suggest a higher level of individual recognition and honor than a volunteered paper to a conference—this is reflected in the order. Teaching in this context, ie, as a list of courses taught, is not competitive, and thus is de-prioritized. Extra training you seek yourself, voluntarily, is fundamentally non-competitive. Etc. Etc.
    What is never included:
    ANYTHING FROM YOUR UNDERGRADUATE YEARS!!!  Remove all undergraduate content, other than listing your BA degree under Education.
    Overseas travel
    Career goals
    Anything you’d see on a business resume.
  25. Upvote
    Fantasmapocalypse got a reaction from Bohme88 in Low Undergrad GPA Stanford PhD program Possible?   
    Generally speaking, grad programs look at your most recent coursework first, starting with your grad degree and privileging your major coursework over electives and non major work.... and your undergrad maybe not mattering much at all.
    IMO your MA speaks to your ability now in addition to your publications. If you want to improve your CV, I would suggest funding or publications, the more prestigious (nationally known journals or the major journals of your field) the better. Your LOR should also speak to your current work ethic and research skills. If you are worried about your undergrad still, you can speak to it in your SOP but I think you are okay.
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