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Rispycat

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  1. Upvote
    Rispycat got a reaction from Psychological Yam in Industrial Organization Psychology Master's Programs   
    I agree with Psychological Yam overall. Esp about the minnesota programs. IUPUI is a great MS program and has one of the best track records in terms of student funding but they do have a diversity science lens. If you have questions about their program feel free to dm me. ☺️
  2. Upvote
    Rispycat got a reaction from NicholeB in Bloomington, IN   
    I just wanted to offer my thoughts. If you do find a single landlord (i.e. local renting one home) it can be good, but this are only found by luck. If you want to k ow about any local landlord's or rental cos feel free to message me. I've dealt with many, and most I haven't my friends have haha. I can also recommend a few places if you send me what you're looking for!
  3. Upvote
    Rispycat got a reaction from historyofsloths in Bloomington, IN   
    Just a warning (lived in btown for 7 yrs), finding a house to rent is very difficult. Especially since most of the rental companies Hocking them are absolute scum. I honestly recommend a townhouse or apartment. Most semi affordable homes ($800-1500) in town are absolute slums. Think years of only ever being student rentals and no updates. The landlord's here are terrible. 
     
    That said, if you do look stay away from Parker management, Pendragon management, and costley & co.  While other companies are also bad, these are the worst. They will rent you a bedbug or cockroach infested house and they will never maintain it. Move out you'll get gouged with $$$ of fees. 
  4. Upvote
    Rispycat reacted to anxietypersonified in Coronavirus & Academia 2020   
    Hey,
    I've thought about the same. I'm an international student and considering Harvard and MIT just sent their students home for spring break indefinitely; I'm not sure what the situation will be in August. Will the start of school be delayed? 
  5. Like
    Rispycat got a reaction from KB23 in Fall 2020 - Where are you going?   
    IUPUI - MS in I/O
     
    So excited!
  6. Like
    Rispycat got a reaction from PsychPhdBound in Fall 2020 - Where are you going?   
    IUPUI - MS in I/O
     
    So excited!
  7. Like
    Rispycat got a reaction from Cascadia in Fall 2020 - Where are you going?   
    IUPUI - MS in I/O
     
    So excited!
  8. Like
    Rispycat got a reaction from Giovanni’s room in Fall 2020 - Where are you going?   
    IUPUI - MS in I/O
     
    So excited!
  9. Upvote
    Rispycat got a reaction from hopefulgrad2019 in Chances of getting into a top program w/ a low-ranked undergraduate institution? (Social psych/OB)   
    Looks like you have a solid shot. 
     
    However, I wouldn't hang so much on that perfect SAT score. Graduate programs will not care about that. It mattered for undergrad, but don't get caught up clinging to that achievement. Instead, focus on your great GRE scores. I wouldn't even mention the SAT to grad programs as it might indicate immaturity since most college graduates don't talk about SAT scores. 
  10. Upvote
    Rispycat got a reaction from Modulus in Chances of getting into a top program w/ a low-ranked undergraduate institution? (Social psych/OB)   
    Looks like you have a solid shot. 
     
    However, I wouldn't hang so much on that perfect SAT score. Graduate programs will not care about that. It mattered for undergrad, but don't get caught up clinging to that achievement. Instead, focus on your great GRE scores. I wouldn't even mention the SAT to grad programs as it might indicate immaturity since most college graduates don't talk about SAT scores. 
  11. Upvote
    Rispycat reacted to devpsych2020 in Chances of getting into a top program w/ a low-ranked undergraduate institution? (Social psych/OB)   
    Hi! None of my following points are definite facts or professional advice, just my two cents (more like 6 cents).
    1. Congrats on your successful undergrad performance. I think that if you cogently illustrate your time-efficient journey, it can vouch for your certain strengths.
    2. GPA/GRE scores will mostly only help you to pass the very first bar (e.g., GPA>3.0 / each GRE section>65th %) of the admissions process (i.e., your application won't be immediately dropped) and adcom/faculties won't look at those scores again once you pass that first bar. Also, GPAs are evaluated regarding the competitiveness of originating schools (e.g., 3.5 from Harvard =/= 3.5 from X Community College).
    3. Relevant research experience and substantial byproducts (e.g, specific statistics/clinical/programming skills, presentations/publications, grant approval, leadership roles, etc) are definitely the core factors that will help you pass further bars during the admissions process. Some people accrue enough research experience during their undergraduate, however, most people find it practically hard to gain a competitive research profile (not just a few lines under your CV's "research experience" section but YOUR competitive research profile) while committing as a full-time college student. That is why most people do Master's and/or post-bacc research training in labs/hospitals/etc with matching research/career focus. I also want to add that many of those who do Master's and/or post-bacc before applying to PhD are also the ones who actively worked as student RAs during undergrad, wrote senior theses, and were well-exposed to presentation/publication efforts during their undergrad. And that they (we) do Master's and/or post-bacc years to further advance and well-compete for the narrow PhD opportunities, not because they (we) lack certain qualities or were lazy during undergraduate. It is just that competitive and limited.
    4. Strong recommendation letters are other important factors that will help you move forward during the admissions process. I believe that the strong letter not only speak for your research/academic achievements, but also your overall attitude/passion/work ethics/growth/and more which are all important characteristics regarded by grad schools to determine if you are a good fit for rigorous graduate curriculum (e.g., competitions, stress, mentor-student attitude, independence, etc). And for someone to strongly voice for your such characteristics, you need to maintain more professional relationship with the letter writer than a regular undergrad-professor one (e.g., Master's advisor, lab supervisor, etc). Of course, PhD applicants bring at least one strong letter from their undergrad, however, you need to submit THREE strong letters and you don't want these three to all sound the same. This is easily another reason why people often continue their research training after bachelor's.
    5. I sincerely don't mean to be rude to you in this 5th point. But it seems like you don't fully understand why the replies on this thread (and everywhere else on the internet) emphasizes "research experience" for Psychology PhD application. Just as one can't ask, "How many coffee dates qualify me to kiss my date without asking her or considering the overall chemistry, etc?", I think it just out of touch to ask how many pubs/presentations you should have to qualify for a psych PhD.
    6. Talk to your faculties about this stuff! It sounds like you have a few professors from college who are happy to chat about your plan for advanced education in psychology (and write your letters, I am assuming?).
    I didn't mean to write so much initially but oh well. Wish you the best in your academic/professional career!
  12. Like
    Rispycat got a reaction from HAC in Statement Woes   
    I so feel this! I started apps the minute they opened and I would have them all in if it weren't for the SOP stress. I have one that is limited to 650 words and UCK. If you ever want to trade SOPs and give each other advice, I'd be happy to!
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