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Cece93

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  1. Like
    Cece93 reacted to jomyers.online in SLP in the Medical Field   
    Hello @dvchay!

    I am looking into working in a medical-based setting as well, so I've scoured around and found as much advice as possible. I will reiterate several times that if you graduate from an accredited program and you are licensed in your state, then you are able to practice in any setting your SLP heart desires. This is more for those that are looking for ways to expand their depth and breadth of knowledge in the area of medical SLP practice, or those that are looking for ways to improve their applications while they are still in their programs to make the job search easier when they graduate. I'm not an expert, so take everything here with a grain of SALT (lol).

    Quick bites if you don’t feel like reading this loooooong post:
    Read, read, read: ASHA SLP Health Care community, Dysphagia Cafe, Tactus Therapy, Medical SLP Collective, Honeycomb Speech Therapy, SLP subreddit (search “medical” or “medSLP”) Spend too much of your time reading? Listen to some podcasts instead: Down the Hatch, Swallow your Pride Join ASHA Special Interest Groups, which are only $10 each for student membership: 2 (neurogenic communication disorders), 13 (dysphagia), 15 (gerontology) Take CEUs: speechpathology.com ($99 for all of their online courses), Aphasia Toolbox, MedBridge  
    First, take a look at which medical settings might interest you:

    Acute care
    Working in acute care, you’ll see complex cases, with many SLPs reporting that the majority of their caseload includes dysphagia and trachs/vents. You’d be working with patients with speech, language, and swallowing difficulties stemming from head injuries, strokes, and other medical issues that result in a typical stay of a few days to a few weeks. There are options for further specializations, like working in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Click here for more information about Acute Care settings.

    Skilled Nursing Facility
    At a Skilled Nursing Facility (often shortened to SNF online, you’ll also see this setting referred to as “long-term care”), You’ll see patients for an average stay of about a month. SLPs report that most of their caseload includes patients with CVA (stroke) and work primarily in the area of swallowing. SNFs get a bad rap online for productivity standards and you’ll occasionally hear about pressure to bill insurance fraudulently. Click here for more information about Long-Term Care settings.

    Pediatric Hospitals
    At a Pediatric Hospital, you’ll be working with children from birth to 18 years old. This is another setting that you’ll see shortened online: you’ll find people refer to these settings as “Peds” or “Pediatrics.” As a SLP specializing in pediatrics, you’ll see a range of disorders. Click here for more information about Pediatric Hospital settings.

    Acute Inpatient Rehabilitation
    Working in inpatient rehabilitation (a.k.a.: “inpatient rehab” or just “inpatient”), you’ll see patients with traumatic brain injuries (TBI) and stroke patients with an average stay of a few weeks. You’ll be working with adults on memory, swallowing, comprehension, expression, and attention goals. Click here for more information about Inpatient Rehab settings.

    Outpatient Clinics
    You’ll have the opportunity to provide services to a wide range of clients in outpatient settings, with ages ranging from infancy to 80+ and a wide variety of diagnoses and goals. The average length of time for working with a patient is 3 months, but this varies. Click here for more information about Outpatient Clinic settings.
     
    Classes to look for in your program:

    If you are already interested in a few programs, compare their curriculum maps and elective courses. You can highlight classes that you are interested in and this process might help you narrow down your decisions. While all accredited programs will prepare you to work in any setting, you’ll find that some programs have dedicated classes in medical-based topics and concerns, while others have a larger part of their curriculum geared toward school-based SLP topics and concerns.  
    Classes to look for include Dysphagia, Neurogenic Motor Speech Disorders, Pediatric Feeding & Swallowing, Interprofessional Practice, Traumatic Brain Injury, Treatment of Voice Disorders in Medical Settings, Dementia, Neuroanatomy & Aphasia.
     
    Opportunities to look for in your program:

    In addition to classes, look for clinical experiences that will help you gain knowledge and experience in medical settings. Advice is frequently tossed around online about finding programs that have hospitals nearby or hospital and medical affiliations, but I’ve yet to find a comprehensive list of these programs. For now, here’s a short list of programs that provide opportunities for specialization: 
    The University of Washington offers a dedicated Medical SLP track and has affiliations with 17 hospitals Chapman University offers an emphasis in medically-related conditions New York Medical College offers LSVT LOUD training, FEES, anatomy dissection classes, an external clinical rotation specifically for medically based competencies, and interprofessional activities with the PT program MGH Institute offers concentrations that include electives, dedicated practicums, and mentorship in areas like Adult Neurogenic Communication Disorders and Medical Speech-Language Pathology.  Portland State University offers a medical concentration with dedicated elective courses, clinical placements in dysphagia and adult medical, and two medical practicum placements  
  2. Like
    Cece93 got a reaction from slpstudent21 in Long Island Programs?   
    hi!!! I am from Long Island and i went to SB for undergrad for bio and psych. I can't tell you anything about their SLP program because it had just started when i was looking into schools, but i personally did not apply because of how they were over the phone. This was back in december of 2019 and i wanted some idea of what the program would be like and they were disorganized and just said look online. I thought i'd called the wrong number at first.  I'd be interested in knowing how the program is. My friend went to LIU post and loved it. When i was looking into colleges she told me she loved her professors and honestly felt like the school prepared her well to become an SLP.
  3. Like
    Cece93 got a reaction from JessC in SOS I'm applying for SLP programs   
    Hi!! The previous poster has some really good advice especially looking at colleges that are a good fit for your current scores. I was very focused on finding a school in NY especially a SUNY and a program I liked. I know NY schools are highly competitive to get into but doable. You really have to play up your strengths and what you bring to the table for each program. I applied to LIU Brooklyn and got in, SUNY Plattsburgh and got in and Iona and got in. I was rejected from the CUNY schools and st Johns like I figured. My speech prerequisite gpa was a 3.4, GRE 290ish, undergrad gpa 3.0(I was a horrible bio major for yrs until I switched). I thought my chances were slim so I limited myself to certain schools and I wish I didn’t. I went into the application process applying all over North America and a few NY schools but I wish I’d focused on NY programs more and applied to more SUNYs.  My biggest advice is know how you measure up to other applicants but don’t count yourself out all together. And make sure your passion for speech is evident in everything you write and in interviews. Oh and I have no research experience. My angle was my work experience and working with individuals from 2ish to 21yrs old with disabilities. And one last thing!! Look for schools who still have their applications open. I know I was applying right up until the deadline lol and some schools might even extend them even after the deadline. Good luck!!
  4. Like
    Cece93 got a reaction from MelMelMel in Has anyone gotten into grad school with a similar resume?   
    My undergrad GPA in psychology was a 3.0 and my CSD GPA was a 3.4. My GRE was I think 290ish and years of experience in ABA and working as a teaching assistant. I am currently attending grad school and was accepted into enough programs that I got to pick which one I really wanted to go to. I did not get into my top choice but I still got in. My CSD grades were a BIG improvement from when I was in undergrad and I was told they liked to see that change. That I had found something I really liked and worked hard for it. Sometimes if feels like you have to be perfect to get into grad school but you don’t and I wish someone had told me that before I applied and all the stress I was under because I thought I would never get in. 
  5. Like
    Cece93 got a reaction from Einnob in Personal Statement ( Education vs Medical SLP route)   
    I wrote my personal statement and letter of intent for my top school and then tweaked  it for each school I was applying to. I’m not sure about focusing on medical or educational. When I applied to programs i guess I focused on school based speech but I also wasn’t applying to programs that were heavily medical. I focused on my love of speech and working with children. You’re not at a disadvantage if you don’t go the medical route. If you know for sure you don’t want to then don’t. If you’re undecided then that’s fine too because we all receive the same foundations and then through clinicals, externships and internships you can receive specialized training and such. Of course some programs are very much geared towards medicine and research but really think about what you want and maybe see if the schools you like have different routes you can take. You can also ask them HOW they would get you ready for the medical field and such. 
  6. Like
    Cece93 got a reaction from Malithi in Personal Statement ( Education vs Medical SLP route)   
    I wrote my personal statement and letter of intent for my top school and then tweaked  it for each school I was applying to. I’m not sure about focusing on medical or educational. When I applied to programs i guess I focused on school based speech but I also wasn’t applying to programs that were heavily medical. I focused on my love of speech and working with children. You’re not at a disadvantage if you don’t go the medical route. If you know for sure you don’t want to then don’t. If you’re undecided then that’s fine too because we all receive the same foundations and then through clinicals, externships and internships you can receive specialized training and such. Of course some programs are very much geared towards medicine and research but really think about what you want and maybe see if the schools you like have different routes you can take. You can also ask them HOW they would get you ready for the medical field and such. 
  7. Upvote
    Cece93 got a reaction from bibliophile222 in U of Washington - EdSLP, CoreSLP   
    I’d say if the program isn’t giving you what you want than apply to different schools. I think it’s great that some schools have specialized focuses but I’ve been told so many times that grad school changes where you thought you’d might like to work. You don’t seem to want to do medical or educational. Would you be fine with doing a research focused program? Why do you want to go to U of Washington? If they aren’t clicking any of your wants then maybe it’s not the right school for you.
  8. Like
    Cece93 got a reaction from gigislp in To wait or not to wait   
    I completely agree. Knowing they have a place next fall changes things and makes the decision more challenging. I’ve already I had time to gain experience, travel some and live. So I was READY to start school. I think it’s hard when you are ready right now to start. I agree it’s about the journey but also the ending. The ending is a new beginning and the finality of being done with the schooling aspect. Op has a lot to think about.
  9. Upvote
    Cece93 got a reaction from pomegranateleaves in To wait or not to wait   
    Wow I can’t believe they wouldn’t allow you to add that course to the fall especially during a time like this. I would personally go with the private school and start. theres no guarantee the state school would accept you again next year. Do amazing your first year and then see if you can get an assistantship or fellowship and get free tuition the following year. If you can take on the debt and you know you would lose motivation if you didn’t start, start now. If I didn’t get into a state school I would’ve gone to a private school in or out of state. I just want to be a SLP already and I knew if I didn’t get in it would be hard for me to keep trying. 
  10. Like
    Cece93 got a reaction from snoozer in Grad School Chances/GRE Help   
    For my template personal statement (that I wrote specifically for one college lol)  I wrote about how I became interested in speech and how that moment shaped my career choices. I became a preschool teaching assistant, worked with special needs older kids in an after school program and did ABA. I wrote about what I learned from them and how it fit into my life goals. I also tied it together with saying heyyyy look at all this broad experience I have. I’ll make a great speech therapist because I’m well rounded. Lol and I ended it with basically saying I will be a speech therapist and a good one and I think your school is the right fit for me and I you.  I applied pieces of this to each statement I wrote. It gave me a starting point for each one and honestly made me less anxious. If you can find someone to read your statements that’s a BIG help. My cousin picked them to shreds but we talked through each one and that made me really confident in what I wrote. Even when she didn’t pick them apart it helped to have someone just read it. 
     
     
    Also thanks for the info! I love hearing about different form of speech therapy.
  11. Upvote
    Cece93 got a reaction from bibliophile222 in To wait or not to wait   
    Wow I can’t believe they wouldn’t allow you to add that course to the fall especially during a time like this. I would personally go with the private school and start. theres no guarantee the state school would accept you again next year. Do amazing your first year and then see if you can get an assistantship or fellowship and get free tuition the following year. If you can take on the debt and you know you would lose motivation if you didn’t start, start now. If I didn’t get into a state school I would’ve gone to a private school in or out of state. I just want to be a SLP already and I knew if I didn’t get in it would be hard for me to keep trying. 
  12. Like
    Cece93 got a reaction from Daisy7200 in To wait or not to wait   
    Wow I can’t believe they wouldn’t allow you to add that course to the fall especially during a time like this. I would personally go with the private school and start. theres no guarantee the state school would accept you again next year. Do amazing your first year and then see if you can get an assistantship or fellowship and get free tuition the following year. If you can take on the debt and you know you would lose motivation if you didn’t start, start now. If I didn’t get into a state school I would’ve gone to a private school in or out of state. I just want to be a SLP already and I knew if I didn’t get in it would be hard for me to keep trying. 
  13. Upvote
    Cece93 got a reaction from snoozer in Grad School Requirements   
    Retaking classes and doing well always shows growth. One bad grade won’t tank your application. A lot of colleges look at you as a whole and not just grades especially one D four years ago. I applied to schools with a C+ in bio and it didn’t stop me. 
  14. Like
    Cece93 got a reaction from experienced_needpaper in Speech Masters programs with lower GPAs   
    Your post bacc GPA is high. I don’t think you have to worry about them looking at your undergrad major too much especially since it was 20yrs ago. You’ve proven that your academics are strong in speech pathology and that counts a lot. My post bacc was a 3.4 and I applied to schools with higher average GPAs and was accepted. I don’t think edfind vs what the schools accept completely match up. Pretty much all the schools that have been circulating that accept students with lower GPAs is all I know, like eastern New Mexico university. What schools were you looking into? 
  15. Like
    Cece93 got a reaction from gigislp in Non-SLP Major, Already Graduated, Deciding about SLP Post-Bacc   
    I decided on a post bacc because I figured if I did one it would cover almost everything I needed. I wasn’t necessarily missing a class that was required but aural rehabilitation would’ve been nice for me to take. I found that out during interview day. It wasn’t a problem for my school or any I applied too. But you can always ask the programs you like if you’re missing something. Also I agree, have a list of schools you want to apply to and what they require. It'll be easier to make sure you have everything done. Worse comes to worse you could always take the courses the summer before you start if you are missing something. Or have it added to your grad courses if that’s an option. 
  16. Upvote
    Cece93 reacted to Avschilling in What do you wish you had known?   
    Be prepared to print ALOT, velcro and laminators will be come your best friend if we are back in person come fall! I'm a second year as well and investing in a quality printer and laminator made the first year so much easier because I was able to work some at home and not spend my life in the clinic 
  17. Upvote
    Cece93 reacted to nwslp in What do you wish you had known?   
    I'm a second year so I haven't already started but I do have some advice! I was so so set on being a medical SLP and grinding my way through hospitals to get a competitive medical CF - then COVID happened. My advice is just to open and know that this a field you can jump around within for your entire career. So my advice is more about doing this during COVID.
    Think of everything you do and every supervisor you interact with as a chance to figure out what you like and don't like and what type of SLP you want to be. I was annoyed the semester I had a full peds caseload but found that I was just as excited working on social skills with neurodivergent kiddos as I was when seeing post-stroke adults but I had to adjust my thinking to accept that. I felt like if I ended up with a CF in a school I was a failure but after mourning the reality of COVID, the fact that our externships are limited and our resumes will look different than expected, I've been able to just keep running lists of what I like about every population I encounter. You might still have a shot at medical externships depending on how the virus goes! Unfortunately, we've been told that hospitals are off the table for Fall and Spring (our only remaining options). We've ALSO been told that hospitals are actively thinking about how to combat this loss of experience and planning to add structured training to CF positions. The whole field is figuring it out!  
    Oh unrelated: keep a positive feedback file on your computer! Anytime my supervisors give me something really positive or new I keep it in there so I can refer back when I start letting constructive feedback feel too personal. You got this!!! 
    TLDR; Be open! Don't limit yourself! Get as much variety as you can and don't get stuck in your thinking. 
  18. Like
    Cece93 got a reaction from gls2814 in Graduate housing or nay..   
    I plan on staying on campus. I lived at home for undergrad and my post bacc classes so I’m looking forward to staying on campus and immersing myself in the college experience. I also plan on finding an on campus job I can do around classes and clinical hours. Yeah it’ll be more expensive but for me it’ll help me focus. I noticed that when i’d sleep over at my friend’s dorm during undergrad. No matter what I’d have roomates and this way I can get to KNOW a group of people before I move off campus with them if I don’t end up in a single room.
  19. Upvote
    Cece93 reacted to bibliophile222 in Procrastinating   
    I've been a horrible, chronic procrastinator since 3rd grade but managed to turn everything in on time during grad school! What helped me the most was using a planner. I would write down what needed to be done each day and then cross it off. Crossing things off was incredibly satisfying. There were plenty of times when I didn't get each day's tasks done, but seeing it there un-crossed-off would nag at me so that I still completed it before the deadline. 
    Another thing that just naturally helped was when things were due. Generally, I would do my class readings during the week because they required less mental energy than writing. I therefore saved the bulk of my written work for the weekend, when I had two whole days to do nothing but schoolwork. Since things were generally due at the beginning of class, I always ended up finishing work a couple days before the due date. If something came up and I couldn't finish it on the weekend, I would still have a few days of wiggle room.
    The third thing that really helped me was to break up tasks into smaller chunks. If you have to read 4 chapters, read one each day instead of putting off all of it. One day, do the research for a paper, the next day write an outline, and the third/fourth days write the paper itself. Write down each step in your planner so you can cross it off and feel motivated.
    One of the good things about grad school is that a lot if your work will be practical: either clinic documentation or practical assignments. Theres more motivation to get the work done because it's less abstract and more meaningful. Also, this may vary by program, but we didn't have any long papers to write. All our teachers taught us to be succinct and enforced maximum page limits, so I hardly ever wrote anything longer than 4 or 5 pages, which made it easier to avoid procrastinating. 
  20. Like
    Cece93 reacted to ColoradoGirl94 in Studying Clinical Psych in the UK as an American   
    Hi there,
    I did my Master's in the U.K. and have a couple answers to your questions. So first, PhD programs do not require a Master's to get into a PhD school, but it is even more difficult, if not impossible, compared to the U.S. to get into a PhD school in the U.K. straight from undergraduate. I had friends in my Master's program (UK citizens) that left undergrad, worked, did a Master's program and still took 2 years to get into a PhD program. These were really smart people too and were getting the equivalent of 4.0 in their degrees. They have significantly fewer schools for PhD programs in the UK than the US so competition is incredibly high. 
    You are definitely less likely to be accepted as an international person. I felt that I got into a Master's program pretty easily but that is because I was paying their 22,000 dollar a year price tag. All PhD programs in the UK are funded so they prefer admitting UK citizens to give them the funding. Staying in the U.K. after does not sway the schools one way or another. It all depends on your visa and the UK visa allows you stay in the UK only for a certain amount of time after your degree ends which I know most people that are international and stay in the UK after their program have a hard time finding a job anyway due to the visa restrictions. 
    The biggest differences between UK and US programs I would say is the difference in needing research for admission. Most of my friends did their Master's and that was enough "research experience" for them to be qualified to apply to be a PhD program. They actually value having clinical experience way more for UK programs because a UK PhD program is more geared towards the clinical side than research.
    Overall, I would recommend against trying to apply for a PhD program in the UK because after doing my Master's I realized that there are some barriers I am even finding in the states of trying to get licensed/jobs due to difference restrictions and curriculum between the U.S. and U.K. Master's programs. 
     
    If you have any other questions, don't hesitate to reach out! I can tell you a lot about the education/culture/school reputations there! 
     
     
  21. Upvote
    Cece93 reacted to hawks2020slp in Review of Monmouth University's SLP Program   
    Writing this because when I was applying for MU, there was very little information about it because the program was (and still is) so new. I think everyone that's considering attending there should know as much about it as possible, because the school you choose really does have an impact on the knowledge you enter the field with. Also, it's expensive, so I'd hate to see more people drop almost $80k and hate it, like a lot of my classmates, or regret it, like almost all of us. 
    About the School: MU is a private university located in West Long Branch, NJ approximately one mile from the beach. Tuition for the 2 year, 6 semester program will run you about $77,000. Courses and clinic take place at the Graduate Center, located on a busy highway. You will see the beautiful, well maintained Main Campus only a handful of times during your two years, unless you go there on your own. The SLP program received accreditation in Winter 2019.
    About the Department: Overall, the department was great up until Spring 2019, which is when things started falling apart. It seemed like once they got accreditation, they just didn't care anymore. 
    The Department Chair: She was more involved with the cohort below mine, as she didn't teach any of our classes that she normally does (Aphasia, Dysphagia). As a result, she barely knew us by name and openly admitted to not knowing us at all. Which isn't a big deal, but for a school that preaches about its small, close knit community, she sure didn't make it feel this way. Contacting the chair was hit or miss for a lot of my classmates, even in urgent matters. There was also an uncalled for attitude most of the time that we were never really sure why it existed.  The Professors: FYI this might not pertain as much to future students because there are courses/professors I can no longer comment on because there have been such drastic faculty changes over the last year or so, but there are a few professors that might still be there when/if you apply.  Fluency/ASD: this professor is SO passionate about all things SLP. It is very obvious he loves being an SLP and teaching future SLPs. He was available pretty much all the time via email and was always willing to set up office visits or phone calls.  Aphasia/Dysphagia/TBI: when I took these courses, they used an adjunct professor because the chair, who usually teaches them, was unable to (maybe it was for the best though, because the first year I was paired with told me she gave two question exams and many people were struggling in the classes). Overall, she wasn't horrible at teaching. Her first semester teaching was rough, as expected, but her second semester she developed a more objective and fair way of grading. Our biggest issues with her were when she told her during the first semester she "never really wanted to teach" and trying to explain to us how we essentially came last on her list of things to do. I'm not asking to be number one, but 1) we're paying (A LOT) for an education and it shouldn't be negatively impacted because of the professor's inability to balance jobs (maybe don't do both then?!) and 2) why would you even say that?! Motor Speech Disorders: can't comment, new professor Voice Resonance Disorders: can't comment, new professor  Introduction to Clinical Methods: taught by the clinic director, who is hot and cold and treats students like children    Pediatric Language Disorders: can't comment (the professor I had taught it to the cohort below me but has left since then, so IDK who will be teaching it in the future) Research Methods/Speech Sound Disorders: I had a professor who left the program, but it is now taught by the professor who teaches Fluency and ASD AAC: professor is very passionate about AAC and is very knowledgable; however, once COVID-19 turned classes online, she didn't post any lectures except one Zoom meeting... The Secretary: Hands down the best member of the department. She's always so friendly and willing to help you out. She does A LOT for the program. What a gem. Issues:
    Cheating and Academic Dishonesty: If you want to go to a graduate school where you can cheat, go to Monmouth! There were SERIOUS cheating problems starting in summer 2018 (yes, the very first semester) which just increased as time passed because the department didn't do anything about it, so other students realized how easy it was to cheat. Of course, I was being facetious - don't go to a school because they don't care or do anything about cheating. It really sucks when you study your ass off and do everything you should to do well, but then you look around and see half of your classmates cheating. I know for a fact an advisor was made aware of the cheating situation in fall 2018 and nothing changed until our TBI final (fall 2019), when it was apparent that the professor was informed of the issue. People still cheated during that final though, because the professor remained on her computer (which is what all the professors do during exams), and cheated in our AAC midterm (spring 2020), too. Loss of A BUNCH of Faculty Members: Losing faculty meant the department had to scramble (literally, there were times we didn't know who'd be teaching the course until a week before) December 2018: lost the PhD professor that taught Motor Speech Disorders and Voice/Resonance Disorders AND the professor who was brought in to teach the aphasia course decided she was not going to return (she came back for TBI in fall 2019 after being asked - aka begged - because they had NO ONE to teach) May 2019: the adjunct professor who took over the chair's position for teaching dysphagia decided she was not going to return  June-ish 2019: lost another PhD professor who did research and supervised students in clinic  July-ish 2019: lost another professor who specializes in and teaches AAC. We have a Rett Syndrome program and she was an asset to clinic because of this.  August 2019: lost the program's most valuable PhD professor. She taught one class each semester, was very knowledgable, and was always available to her students.  Lack of Communication: There were issues with where to send praxis scores, because the department never told us all the places we needed to send scores to (not even during their praxis bootcamp), and when confronted about it, she insisted that the department has been communicating with us the entire time when they were NOT. Also, there were major communication issues about the comprehensive portfolio all graduating students must complete. We were given basic a Word document about it in fall 2019 during out Autism class and were never told anything else, and the document wasn't very detailed in regards to how they wanted things structured and written. This led to one of our professors getting swarmed with emails from my entire cohort and the chair did very little during this even though she was technically in charge of the portfolio. No additional information was ever shared with us, which made it difficult and VERY stressful to complete the portfolio. The lack of communication from a department whose education lies in communication is pathetic.  External Practicum Placements: some students didn't get a medical placement at all (who wanted one) and some got two medical placements, some got the exact sites they wanted while others didn't at all. There was definitely unfairness occurring in giving out sites. Preparedness for Externships: there are quite a few sites that have not been happy with Monmouth students. as they feel they are not prepared well Class/Semester Structure: I'll share my schedule as a first and second year student, but this could change, especially with COVID-19 (I'll try to add notes to things I know changed)
    Summer 2018: 2 classes - Intro to Clinical Methods and Pediatric Language Disorders. Classes Monday - Thursday, one class was MW, the other TTH, for 3 hours each (I believe it was 9ish-12 ish and 12:30-3:45) Fall 2019: 4 classes + on campus clinic  Mondays: clinic (differing time slots for each group of 4 students, anywhere from starting at 9:00 am to ending at 7:00 pm) Tuesdays: 2 classes (speech sound disorders & voice, we were there from about 11am to 6 pm bc of gaps b/w the classes) Wednesdays: clinic (same schedule as Monday) Thursdays: 2 classes (motor speech & aphasia, there from about 11am to 730 pm due to gaps) Fridays: Seminar and Group Therapy. Seminar occurred before group, group started at 1:00pm. Group consisted of small groups, so you'd be with your group of students with a group of adults/kids (kids group was cancelled after a few weeks because only 1 or 2 would show up for it). The rest of the group were mainly adults with aphasia, dysarthria, etc.  Grand Rounds: near the end of the semester. you pick a client you have and present on them.  Spring 2019: 3 classes + on campus clinic (we had too many in our cohort so our research class was separated into 2 groups) Mondays: clinic Tuesdays: research 1 & dysphagia (we were there from 12ish to 8:30ish, with about a 1 hour break in between) Wednesdays: clinic Thursdays: fluency & research 2 (about 9:30 to 4:30) Fridays: seminar (45 min - 1 hr) and group therapy (this was changed so that only one group would go per week, so everyone had to drive to campus for the 45 min seminar and then could leave unless they had group - this changed with the latest cohort, seminar was removed) Summer B 2019: 2 classes (assessment & audiology) Each class took place twice a week, but on the same day. We were there for approximately 7ish hours each day (2 days per week) Summer E 2019: Diagnostics (on campus clinic where you assess clients). Twice per week, for about 3.5 hours. Either MW or TTH. On Mondays/Tuesdays you'd assess the client, reports are due by the beginning of "class" on Wednesday or Thursday, then once it's edited and finalized, you use the rest of the 3 hours to plan for the upcoming week's assessment. (for summer 2020, diagnostics is utilizing simucase) Fall 2019: 2 classes + external practicum  Tuesdays: ASD 6-9 Thursdays: TBI 6-9 Spring 2020: 2 classes + external practicum  Wednesdays: AAC Online: Professional Issues External practicum for spring semesters have a "Clinical Expo" where you prepare a project/presentation (either pertaining to an on campus client if you're a first year or relating to your externship if you're a second year) My personal feelings towards the program: I loved the program until all the issues began. Once we started losing faculty, the professors that were brought in were questionable in regards to their teaching abilities. It was apparent they were good at their day job, but teaching SLP was a challenge for most. Many of my classmates, myself included, feel ill prepared to enter the field. We believe the department really did the bare minimum, which coincidentally began when they received accreditation status. There are some professors who are good at their jobs and truly care, but that doesn't make up for those that weren't so great, nor does it make up for the departments total disregard of major issues and their lack of communication. Many us of regret choosing Monmouth because the program is NOT worth the ridiculous cost of tuition. If it was an amazing program that provided a quality education and really "opened doors" after graduation, I could maybe justify the $75k for it. But for a lackluster, inadequate education? Nope, not worth it unless you have to or really want to go there. 
  22. Like
    Cece93 got a reaction from SRod2015 in Schools that do not look at GPA as much   
    I also thought only those with perfect GPAs get into master’s programs in general. You do not need perfect experience or GPAs. I would say look for programs that care more about who you are as a person than just your GPA like SUNY Plattsburgh. That will come from people’s personal experiences with interviews. I see you were accepted into a program so congrats!! 
  23. Upvote
    Cece93 reacted to bibliophile222 in I'm having doubts...   
    I didn't get into my top choice school (in-state tuition, only 10 minutes from my house) and it was a huge bummer. I ended up picking an expensive school that required me to move a few hours a way over an even more expensive online program.
    Do I still wish that I'd gotten into the in-state school and wonder what I could have done to get in? Absolutely. Have I been unhappy or unfulfilled with my current program? Absolutely not. It ended up being such a good program and experience with a really tight-knit cohort and supportive professors. I don't love everything about the area I'm now living, but I like it a lot and feel fine staying here at least through my CF.
    I think you may always have regrets because, hey, that's life and hindsight is always 20/20. It doesn't mean you need to regret where you end up. Worst case scenario, two or so years of your life won't be great, but you'll still have decades of doing what you love. Best case scenario, it could end up being the perfect program for you and you'll make some great friends and connections. It's natural to get cold feet before a huge change in your life, but don't forget to be excited about all the possibilities life now has to offer!
    And now, a philosophical note:
    As I've progressed through grad school, struggled with money, etc, I've come to really appreciate the Rolling Stones' message that "you can't always get what you want, but if you try sometimes you might find you get what you need". I haven't won the lottery or ended up at my top school, but time and again I've gotten what I need. It may not be as exciting as getting what I want, but it still allows me to be happy and fulfilled.
    Sorry for the essay! I'm sleepy and procrastinating bedtime. 🙂
  24. Like
    Cece93 got a reaction from nanis in Tuition Cost/Rant/Advice   
    I also applied later than other people and I found that my choices were limited. I did apply to a lot of places still because I just wanted to get in and as I got into private colleges I realized HOW expensive their tuition was. I was lucky to get into a state school
    I literally applied to at the last minute. It turned out that I loved it. Even planning for state school living and tuition plus my undergrad loans is stressful. One program I really wanted to get into was 100k just for tuition. I don’t understand how colleges can charge that much.
  25. Like
    Cece93 got a reaction from AspiringSLP35 in Have you received responses from all grad programs?   
    I’m still waiting to hear back from 4 schools. 3 NYC schools and 1 PA school. 
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