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ritapita

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  1. Upvote
    ritapita got a reaction from eeee1923 in Tips for a new student?   
    Some of your questions are program specific, but to offer some general advice...
     
    1. Do everything you can to maintain a high GPA.  This is most important in your subject matter courses, but try to keep everything above a "B".
    - Don't do many "W" (withdraw) in courses or take incompletes that you cannot finish.  
    - If you need to get help from writing centers, or math tutors, or anything else to help you succeed, do it.
    - Don't take any superfluous courses.  If you need to take electives, try to find some that fit your academic interests.  Make each course count.  Yoga might be fun, but why spend money on a class that has nothing to do with your end goal....
    - When looking for classes beyond your required core coursework, check ALL other departments. You will find some gems in there that you might not expect.  Anthro might have a class like 'market economies of pre-colonized indigenous cultures', or gender studies might have something like 'immigrant workers in the meat packing industry'.  These are just examples, but as you can see, you can find economic topics in a variety of course settings that will broaden your knowledge base and experience.  They may also assist you in determining what capacity you want to function in or what you want to specialize in as you advance through school.
     
    2. Try to get applicable experience through internships, etc.  This might be more appropriate in your last couple of years but start researching options and interests for when the time comes.  
     
    3.  If you know you want to get into certain schools, at the minimum go to that school website and identify what they consider a strong applicant, and model your undergrad experience to fit this.  You can even contact the department, and ask them what the profile is for their best applicants...i.e. GRE scores, GPA, work experience, etc.
     
    4.  Know what you want to specialize in, and make sure the schools you want to go to can accommodate that specialization in grad work.  Again, this will be easier to figure out after you have been in school for a while.  If you want to stay in a specific regional area and only apply to specific schools, it is good to remember that you are going to possibly need to be a little flexible in your interests.  If those schools that you 'must' apply to don't have faculty that focus on your interests, and you don't have the option to apply elsewhere, it is better to know now so you can tailor your education to that.  
     
    5. Begin to build positive relationships early with faculty mentors in your field. Also foster these relationships in your internship settings. You will need strong recommendation letters when you apply to grad school, and many undergrads have a hard time mustering up 3-4 faculty that know them well enough to write them a strong letter.  
     
    6. Do some sort of service activities with your university, whether it is volunteering in a certain student center, providing tutoring, departmental assistantships, etc. There are many things you can do, but as a student who also started undergrad at 26, some of the options I found very inapplicable to me on campus.  Be creative, and ask your department about things you can do, or faculty that need assistance with projects, etc.
     
    7. Take the GRE without a break from school.  You will most likely take the GRE in the summer or fall prior to your graduation.  I recommend spending the summer studying, and then taking in the fall with enough time to get your scores where you need to get them.  You will apply for grad school somewhere between November and January of your last year in undergrad if you are going to transition to grad school directly after graduation. 
     
    8.  Make a timeline and course plan for yourself, and keep yourself on schedule.  I saw my undergrad much like a checklist.  I made my course plan, and as I completed classes I just checked them off the list.  It was satisfying, especially when you are getting through general ed stuff.  Put stuff on your timeline like internships, GRE prep and test, grad school pre-app visits, etc.  Whatever you need..having that plan makes it real, and easy to follow.
  2. Upvote
    ritapita got a reaction from Ritwik in Tips for a new student?   
    Some of your questions are program specific, but to offer some general advice...
     
    1. Do everything you can to maintain a high GPA.  This is most important in your subject matter courses, but try to keep everything above a "B".
    - Don't do many "W" (withdraw) in courses or take incompletes that you cannot finish.  
    - If you need to get help from writing centers, or math tutors, or anything else to help you succeed, do it.
    - Don't take any superfluous courses.  If you need to take electives, try to find some that fit your academic interests.  Make each course count.  Yoga might be fun, but why spend money on a class that has nothing to do with your end goal....
    - When looking for classes beyond your required core coursework, check ALL other departments. You will find some gems in there that you might not expect.  Anthro might have a class like 'market economies of pre-colonized indigenous cultures', or gender studies might have something like 'immigrant workers in the meat packing industry'.  These are just examples, but as you can see, you can find economic topics in a variety of course settings that will broaden your knowledge base and experience.  They may also assist you in determining what capacity you want to function in or what you want to specialize in as you advance through school.
     
    2. Try to get applicable experience through internships, etc.  This might be more appropriate in your last couple of years but start researching options and interests for when the time comes.  
     
    3.  If you know you want to get into certain schools, at the minimum go to that school website and identify what they consider a strong applicant, and model your undergrad experience to fit this.  You can even contact the department, and ask them what the profile is for their best applicants...i.e. GRE scores, GPA, work experience, etc.
     
    4.  Know what you want to specialize in, and make sure the schools you want to go to can accommodate that specialization in grad work.  Again, this will be easier to figure out after you have been in school for a while.  If you want to stay in a specific regional area and only apply to specific schools, it is good to remember that you are going to possibly need to be a little flexible in your interests.  If those schools that you 'must' apply to don't have faculty that focus on your interests, and you don't have the option to apply elsewhere, it is better to know now so you can tailor your education to that.  
     
    5. Begin to build positive relationships early with faculty mentors in your field. Also foster these relationships in your internship settings. You will need strong recommendation letters when you apply to grad school, and many undergrads have a hard time mustering up 3-4 faculty that know them well enough to write them a strong letter.  
     
    6. Do some sort of service activities with your university, whether it is volunteering in a certain student center, providing tutoring, departmental assistantships, etc. There are many things you can do, but as a student who also started undergrad at 26, some of the options I found very inapplicable to me on campus.  Be creative, and ask your department about things you can do, or faculty that need assistance with projects, etc.
     
    7. Take the GRE without a break from school.  You will most likely take the GRE in the summer or fall prior to your graduation.  I recommend spending the summer studying, and then taking in the fall with enough time to get your scores where you need to get them.  You will apply for grad school somewhere between November and January of your last year in undergrad if you are going to transition to grad school directly after graduation. 
     
    8.  Make a timeline and course plan for yourself, and keep yourself on schedule.  I saw my undergrad much like a checklist.  I made my course plan, and as I completed classes I just checked them off the list.  It was satisfying, especially when you are getting through general ed stuff.  Put stuff on your timeline like internships, GRE prep and test, grad school pre-app visits, etc.  Whatever you need..having that plan makes it real, and easy to follow.
  3. Upvote
    ritapita got a reaction from 12345678900987654321 in How to ensure department pays for visit after acceptance?   
    Thank you for all the 'positive' responses, and as an incoming grad, understanding my concerns.  There is a lot to consider when accepting a programs offer, and I know better than to just take things for face value, thus asking for advice from those that have been-there-done-that is super helpful.  
     
    GradSec - helpful comments and advice are always happily received.  
  4. Upvote
    ritapita got a reaction from lazaria in Dear Digital Humanists...   
    Arizona State is doing a lot of interdisciplinary DH work right now, and pushing for more in the future.  I recommend you talk to the current DGS for the department at ASU. 
  5. Upvote
    ritapita reacted to TakeruK in Negotiable Offers   
    Some of these answers may be really field dependent.
     
    If you appear like you are simply going to go to the school that pays you more, both schools will be put off by this. On the other hand, if you demonstrate that you need the additional stipend in order to make ends meet then they will at least understand why you are asking for more (even if they can't offer it).
     
    From your description, it actually does not sound like you are in any position to negotiate at all. Usually, you do this if you really want to attend School A, but School B has a better financial offer, and that School A and School B are both similarly ranked programs. Then, you can tell School A that you really prefer their program but School B is offering such-and-such and they are also a good program and having financial security etc. would be better for you there. Then you would ask politely if they were able to offer more.
     
    Strictly speaking, I do not think it's unethical to pit two schools in a bidding war. That is, in the above example, if you really wanted to attend School B (secretly) but you tell School A the above and then you get an offer from School A that is better than B. Then you would go and tell B that A is offering such-and-such and try to get a better offer from B. I don't think this is unethical, but I really really doubt it will work in practice. And even if it's ethical, School A is going to be pretty pissed at you because they likely went through a lot of trouble to authorize the better offer. So the reality is that graduate students don't really have a lot of ability to negotiate and I think you have to weigh the practical aspects too. I think that trying to pit two schools against each other has a low chance of working and a high chance of pissing everyone off. So I would advise against that.
     
    Instead, I would advise for honesty and good faith in your negotiating. That is, only ask the school you are actually intending you attend to raise their offer. That is, be prepared to accept their offer if they agree to your request. And if they don't (or only go partway), then it's up to you to decide between A and B. 
     
    Stipend is certainly negotiable, but it can be pretty tough at some places. You will likely get an answer like "we pay all our students the same". This may actually be an outright lie to discourage negotiation but it's also often true. However, they can always say things like that which makes it very hard to gain ground on that front.
     
    So, here are some other financial things that people in my field often negotiate outside of stipend:
     
    1. Increased support for health insurance (if it's not already fully covered). Ditto for any spouse and/or dependents you may have.
    2. Relocation costs. In my field, most postdocs positions will cover between $1000-$3000 in costs, so start there but be prepared for a smaller number for grad students.
    3. Work-related travel expenses. Get a promise from your supervisor to send you to X conferences, or a promise from a department for a travel grant of $X (need to get this in writing).
    4. Research grant expenses. One program at my current school gives every student a $1500 grant to buy things (many use this to buy a laptop but you can also use it for travel) etc.
    5. Increased TA assignments (more work for more money)
     
    You can also ask for non-financial things that might make your life easier:
     
    1. Switch out TA work for RA work. (Might be field dependent, but our RA work is just work towards dissertation, so this effectively reduces  your TA obligation while keeping the same pay--but make sure TA and RAships are awarded the same way).
    2. Ask if you can get priority in whatever waitlists that might be relevant to you: e.g. housing, childcare, etc.
    3. Ask nicely if you can get some upgrades for your office (only applicable if you already visited and know what your space will be like)--e.g. one school installed a new bulletin board at my request and also found a better chair and filing cabinet for me. However, this is something that doesn't really make sense to get in writing or as a condition of your acceptance. Instead, this is something you might ask your supervisor if it is relevant or comes up. For my example, the prof actually asked me what I would want, so that was a nice opening for me to just give a wishlist. I don't know if it's that easy if ask for it upfront though.
    4. Guaranteed vacation time (especially if you need to take time off for something you know is coming up, e.g. wedding)
     
    Just some ideas that you can try to ask politely for. Don't be surprised if they say no. But you have nothing to lose if you approach this in an appropriate way.
  6. Upvote
    ritapita got a reaction from PhDinEdu in Negotiating moving expenses?   
    We are on grad cafe to talk with others and ask questions about things we don't know, or are concerned about as we go through the process.  Much of this is due to the fact that we want to ensure we approach departments in a proper way. Many of us on here prefer to be as informed as possible before we contact department representatives.  GradCafe is often our first stop for clarification...rather than your email inbox. My guess is that many of the applicants feeding you questions or doing things you don't like or approve of, are not GradCafe frequenters. We are here asking questions and researching info to make both our lives AND yours easier.  I doubt you would rather field these questions.  Most of us are very far from being entitled or helpless. Before making generalized insults, I hope you can somehow remember that you know very little to nothing about why we are here.  We are in the middle of a process that keeps a large amount of us functioning around poverty level and highly in debt, with uncertain employment during or after, many of us working outside our programs to support this process, and many of us have families to support as well.  You have a job because we want to be grad students.  If we are so difficult for you to deal with during your job, why are you on here outside of work? If you are on here because you want to be helpful, I hope you reconsider your current approach.
  7. Downvote
    ritapita reacted to 12345678900987654321 in late recommendations   
    I work with scatterbrained profs all day, every day. Because of this, I also understand that some of them find it an absolute chore to upload a letter.
     
    I'm going to design a research project to determine if grad school turns people helpless or if helpless people are attracted to grad school. After some of the applicants I've seen this season I'm going with the latter.
  8. Upvote
    ritapita got a reaction from breaks0 in Where are you applying for 2015?   
    Got an acceptance to Kansas State today.  Still waiting on 2 programs.  I specialize in rural cultural geographies, so it is a great choice for me, but I still can't wait to see if there will be other options. So nice to know I have at least one.  

    How is everyone else doing?
  9. Upvote
    ritapita got a reaction from bindlestiff in Watching my emails, but NOTHING comes!   
    I must say, I am actually somewhat thankful for the weekends because that is the time that I know there is absolutely nothing I can do about the situation.  Its during the week that is rough, because I know that they are in the office, and must be discussing all of our apps, and why on earth can't they just send me that email or pick up the phone!! As soon as I know its technically close-of-business for the day at each school, I actually relax a bit.  Besides, I can have a cocktail and sleep in on the weekends, which helps this situation a lot! 
  10. Upvote
    ritapita got a reaction from chrissysparkle in Watching my emails, but NOTHING comes!   
    those close to me are now just shaking their heads every time I bring up 'no news'.  I am going insane because several Masters acceptances have posted for my top choice, but no PhD results...I just don't understand . I also know that my top choice made many decisions last friday for acceptances and funding, but still...crickets for miles.  I calm myself by telling myself the 'delay' is that those acceptances must now be going through their grad college before notification.  One of my schools was due Dec 1, and still silence...and they don't use a web app system so I have no way to be OCD about checking their site.  I keep telling myself it is early, but it doesn't help.  I seriously had no idea I would be this insane about the process.  I was so burnt out after applying that I thought I would naturally be disconnected from it.  Man was I wrong!
  11. Upvote
    ritapita reacted to TXInstrument11 in Let's Overanalyze Together   
    Oh God. Interpreting the tone of POIs is the worst. At the end of it, you either feel like that they LOVE you, HATE you with the passion of a thousand suns, or that you are suffering from chronic social incompetence and can't properly interpret basic social interactions or read simply emails. 
     
    I've kept my emails to POIs very short and to-the-point because profs at my school overwhelmingly prefer those kinds of emails, and this has had some very mixed results.
     
    One of my POIs responds likewise, but uses exclamation points, "thank you"s, and smileys, so I always feel encouraged when I receive communications from him.
     
    The other one I've contacted, however, keeps her emails even more ridiculously terse with absolutely zero cues as to what she's thinking. She may simply be keeping with the unofficial email format I started and is probably efficient and/or lazy, but I can't help assuming she hates me or is an Ice Queen. Either way, it's truly doing a number on my nerves. If she calls and ends up being really sugary sweet, I'm either calling bullshit that I've been trolled, suspecting she's a manipulative psychopath, or passing out from the shock. 
     
    This isn't overanalysis. This is WWII, I'm Alan Turing, and her emails are the German Enigma Code. 
  12. Upvote
    ritapita reacted to blasian in Managing your mental health/illness in grad school   
    You should check if your school has Disability Student Services. Some of them only require documentation from your doctor in order to get enrolled, and from there they may be able to provide services that you may need due to complications of your illness/health. I know that at my school diagnosed depression and other psychological diagnoses counts under such services. 
     
    Also doing other things in conjunction with medication that promote wellness: exercise, eating right, sleeping enough. finding hobbies outside of school work (yes it is necessary), going to therapy, finding supportive folks regarding mental health and finding supportive folks regarding school, finding community regarding hobbies, and the ultimate of finding supportive folks that fall into multiple categories. 
     
    Good Luck!
  13. Upvote
    ritapita reacted to owbee in Let's Overanalyze Together   
    Not only do I keep checking my inbox, but i keep checking the junk folder too.
    And i keep thinking that i shouldv'e retaken the GRE and TOEFL. I should have applied to more colleges too.
  14. Upvote
    ritapita got a reaction from jujubea in Best way to decline an offer. Discuss please...   
    I have been thinking a lot about what to say when it comes time to decline offers (if of course I am lucky enough to be presented with that predicament!).  I have been working with each POI extensively over the course of several months, and have really grown to like them in the process.  It is going to be uncomfortable of course if I then need to cut that cord. Most likely only on my part...but I would hope there would be a tad bit of disappointment on their end. They have each done a lot of work on my behalf to help with applications, funding searches, etc etc. I know that it is part of the process and that they expect this to occur with many of the potential students they engage with, but I am looking for input on the most professional way to approach this difficult task.
     
    I am curious how others have approached this...
  15. Upvote
    ritapita got a reaction from WhatAmIDoingNow in Multiple Advanced Degrees   
    I have 2 Masters and a grad certificate.  Now heading into a PhD, and after 4 years already in grad coursework I am burnt.  I know I will be excited and renewed in a new program, but seriously so done with classes.  I am very specific about my research and end goal so I know I am doing the right thing, but sometimes I do wonder...
  16. Upvote
    ritapita got a reaction from Mrs. C in How many is too many?   
    IMO I would visit as many schools as your schedule feasibly allows.  Pace yourself, but do as many as you can.  This is a decision that you will only make once and a visit can really do a lot to factor in to your decision making.  I have done visits to a couple schools that were super high on my list and when I got there, I removed them from my list altogether.  I would have regretted heading to one of those schools had I not visited prior.  I have also visited schools that were low on my list and suddenly became very high on the list.   If you have a grand and glorious idea of a place and you get there and the lab is crap or the professors are dismissive or unengaged or you simply cannot stand the campus and surrounding area, then you have saved yourself from several years of misery.   Right now my 3rd choice school was never even on my list until I visited it, and fell in love with the faculty dynamics and location and working area.  I know I would be very comfortable there, when previously they weren't even an option.  In comparison, one of my top choices had labspace still in construction (for the next 4 years...almost my entire program time!) which meant researchers literally had nowhere to work, and clear budget issues which were impeding grad teaching, etc.  None of this would have been known had I not showed up.
     
     If you have them paying for you to visit, you are losing nothing but possibly some sleep.  Take advantage of it.  It will really help you decide. And this is a decision that will affect the rest of your life.
  17. Upvote
    ritapita reacted to EelPoweredHovercraft in Anybody else apply to just a couple (or a few) schools?   
    I only applied to 2 when I was appyling for my master's and I applied to 4 for my PhD. I have specific things I want to work on, so I only applied to places that were doing what I wanted to do. I also didn't want to apply to places that were obviously reaches just to see if it would work.  My thought was that sure, I could apply to Harvard, or I could take $100 and set it on fire. The end result would probably be the same.
  18. Upvote
    ritapita got a reaction from braindump in How many is too many?   
    IMO I would visit as many schools as your schedule feasibly allows.  Pace yourself, but do as many as you can.  This is a decision that you will only make once and a visit can really do a lot to factor in to your decision making.  I have done visits to a couple schools that were super high on my list and when I got there, I removed them from my list altogether.  I would have regretted heading to one of those schools had I not visited prior.  I have also visited schools that were low on my list and suddenly became very high on the list.   If you have a grand and glorious idea of a place and you get there and the lab is crap or the professors are dismissive or unengaged or you simply cannot stand the campus and surrounding area, then you have saved yourself from several years of misery.   Right now my 3rd choice school was never even on my list until I visited it, and fell in love with the faculty dynamics and location and working area.  I know I would be very comfortable there, when previously they weren't even an option.  In comparison, one of my top choices had labspace still in construction (for the next 4 years...almost my entire program time!) which meant researchers literally had nowhere to work, and clear budget issues which were impeding grad teaching, etc.  None of this would have been known had I not showed up.
     
     If you have them paying for you to visit, you are losing nothing but possibly some sleep.  Take advantage of it.  It will really help you decide. And this is a decision that will affect the rest of your life.
  19. Upvote
    ritapita reacted to rising_star in Professors not giving any feedback?   
    It's definitely partially because it's time-consuming. My experience was that I got more feedback from profs if I made it clear that I was planning to build on or develop that class paper into something else. So, for example, I wrote research proposals for final papers on multiple occasions and I'd always make sure to get the professor's feedback on those. They usually provided it in writing, though sometimes I had to meet with them and get the feedback orally. If you take the initiative to ask for feedback because you want to do something with the document later, people tend to respond well.
     
    As a fellow social sciences person, I would urge you not to write any "throwaway" papers. Basically everything I wrote in grad school for a final paper served me in some way. I wrote sample comp answers, research proposals, book reviews, conference papers, and draft chapters for my courses. Our professors encouraged us to do so, in part because they knew we needed to be doing all of those other things anyway. I'd encourage you to do the same. Good luck!
  20. Upvote
    ritapita got a reaction from doobiebrothers in Putting "additional info" in application?   
    I have cancer and am currently going through chemo.  I have not taken any time off, but did take a couple incompletes that I am finalizing and that will not be posted until after I submit transcripts.  None of my applications have any 'additional info' spaces.  However, I have had long-term dialogue with all my POIs - even from before my diagnosis.  They have kind of seen me go through it.  I have been very upfront and honest with them all from the beginning because it has affected my ability to visit campuses, and even had me reconsider applications.  With that said, they all told me to put that in my SOP - 4 schools told me to!  Why? because it helps contextualize any struggle you have had to overcome during your schooling, and if you still walked away with good GPA etc, it shows dedication and resilience.  I left it out of one (my top choice school), and my POI had volunteered to edit my SOP - he sent it back to me and told me to include at least one sentence explaining my cancer situation - that it prevented me from applying last year, affected my GRE score since I had to take it during chemo, and why I am resolving incompletes on my record.  I have always had feedback that disclosing a hardship is nothing to hide. It shouldn't be the focus, but cancer is no joke.  Seriously, if you are going to be working with these people for several years as you develop research, they need to know who you are, and how hard you are willing to work regardless of the situation you are in.  Also remember that adcomms and faculty are people too...many have been through serious things in their own life...cancer, disability, divorce, etc etc.  They are not immune, and many can relate to you.  They can look at you and say...hey, this student is a trooper...
     
    I also know, as a cancer inflicted person, that we all deal with our cancers differently.  Many people are very private about their experience, and that is what you might need to do for your own personal reasons.  It depends on what you are comfortable with, but I guess my point is to not be ashamed of it, and not hide your experience with it, for anyone else. You went through it and it made you stronger and you are still pushing through your academics, and that is an accomplishment that not only you should be proud of, but in my opinion bears more weight than any academic success.
     
    PM me if you would ever like to chat! I welcome the dialogue
  21. Upvote
    ritapita got a reaction from drownsoda in Putting "additional info" in application?   
    I have cancer and am currently going through chemo.  I have not taken any time off, but did take a couple incompletes that I am finalizing and that will not be posted until after I submit transcripts.  None of my applications have any 'additional info' spaces.  However, I have had long-term dialogue with all my POIs - even from before my diagnosis.  They have kind of seen me go through it.  I have been very upfront and honest with them all from the beginning because it has affected my ability to visit campuses, and even had me reconsider applications.  With that said, they all told me to put that in my SOP - 4 schools told me to!  Why? because it helps contextualize any struggle you have had to overcome during your schooling, and if you still walked away with good GPA etc, it shows dedication and resilience.  I left it out of one (my top choice school), and my POI had volunteered to edit my SOP - he sent it back to me and told me to include at least one sentence explaining my cancer situation - that it prevented me from applying last year, affected my GRE score since I had to take it during chemo, and why I am resolving incompletes on my record.  I have always had feedback that disclosing a hardship is nothing to hide. It shouldn't be the focus, but cancer is no joke.  Seriously, if you are going to be working with these people for several years as you develop research, they need to know who you are, and how hard you are willing to work regardless of the situation you are in.  Also remember that adcomms and faculty are people too...many have been through serious things in their own life...cancer, disability, divorce, etc etc.  They are not immune, and many can relate to you.  They can look at you and say...hey, this student is a trooper...
     
    I also know, as a cancer inflicted person, that we all deal with our cancers differently.  Many people are very private about their experience, and that is what you might need to do for your own personal reasons.  It depends on what you are comfortable with, but I guess my point is to not be ashamed of it, and not hide your experience with it, for anyone else. You went through it and it made you stronger and you are still pushing through your academics, and that is an accomplishment that not only you should be proud of, but in my opinion bears more weight than any academic success.
     
    PM me if you would ever like to chat! I welcome the dialogue
  22. Upvote
    ritapita got a reaction from awash_ in All my eggs in one basket   
    Best of luck to you lizardclan.  Keep us posted
     
    I take out max student loans, but no credit cards. Interest rates are better and you have longer to pay, among other reasons. Its been tempting from time to time, but I refuse.  I have had to long term plan for application season.  Last student loan cycle I used part of my refund to order all my transcripts and pay in advance for my GRE.  This loan cycle I used part of my refund to pay for my applications, which I was able to do yesterday (4 days before apps were due!)  I never asked for waivers, but now I wish I had.  I don't even know if the schools I applied to had them. I originally was only going to apply to one school, but many faculty told me to at least do 2 more.
     
    mb712 - don't be embarrassed to ask for help from parents or friends with this stuff!  Easier said than done, but you are doing something good, and they should be proud of you.   Its not like asking for money for a tv or something.  I am a slightly older student, and my son is in his first year of college now.  I actually am using bits of my student loan to set aside for some of his expenses so he won't have to cover them.  I would gladly pay for my son's grad apps, as I am sure many parents would. School is tough and poverty ridden for most. I am sure they understand!  I am 40 and I had to ask my mom to order some transcripts for me for my apps.
     
    Also, I know we are all as creative as we can be with finding money to live on during school.  There are days I wasn't able to get to class because I couldn't afford gas. It can be super tight.  I happened upon a cat sitting gig for a faculty member, and now almost 3 years later I have a good handful of faculty that I housesit or pet sit for and it is great supplemental funds.  Not only that but it is a quiet place I can get work done.  Maybe ask around.  All my faculty pay me $20 per day, one pays me extra for gas. Many stock the fridge for me too. I also housesit for fellow grads when they are out of town, but only charge them $10 a day unless they are loaded.  Every month I make a good extra $200 and during the summer, I am even better off.  Plus there are no taxes to pay on that.  
  23. Upvote
    ritapita got a reaction from mop in Dealing with burnout...   
    Just wanted to start a thread and see what people have to say about dealing with burnout...you know, when you have another 20+ pages to write, and they were due like yesterday and all you can do is stare at the screen and the last thing you want to do is type anything because the action of thinking and regurgitating any more info makes you feel like that time you ate too many clif bars on that camping trip 8 years ago and now you can never ever eat another clif bar ever again, and if you do you will puke.  That.  
     
    I know it passes, I know we have all been there.  But seriously, how do you all tackle this issue?
  24. Upvote
    ritapita got a reaction from iphi in Dealing with burnout...   
    Just wanted to start a thread and see what people have to say about dealing with burnout...you know, when you have another 20+ pages to write, and they were due like yesterday and all you can do is stare at the screen and the last thing you want to do is type anything because the action of thinking and regurgitating any more info makes you feel like that time you ate too many clif bars on that camping trip 8 years ago and now you can never ever eat another clif bar ever again, and if you do you will puke.  That.  
     
    I know it passes, I know we have all been there.  But seriously, how do you all tackle this issue?
  25. Upvote
    ritapita got a reaction from blinchik in Dealing with burnout...   
    Just wanted to start a thread and see what people have to say about dealing with burnout...you know, when you have another 20+ pages to write, and they were due like yesterday and all you can do is stare at the screen and the last thing you want to do is type anything because the action of thinking and regurgitating any more info makes you feel like that time you ate too many clif bars on that camping trip 8 years ago and now you can never ever eat another clif bar ever again, and if you do you will puke.  That.  
     
    I know it passes, I know we have all been there.  But seriously, how do you all tackle this issue?
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