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Found 26 results

  1. For the first time, I"m starting to question whether I should pursue a career in academia, and i"d appreciate advice. First, I was generally a good student, having graduated with a 3.93 GPA in interdisciplinary studies, plus I had six graduate level history credits in history (the subject I want to study in grad. school [particularly the 20th century postwar period]). I was sure that I wanted to go to grad. school and eventually pursue a Ph.D., but some experiences I had are causing me to question whether an academic career is the right path for me. While I am generally a strong student, I do not handle stress well, and this affected a crucial paper in a graduate level class I was taking as an undergrad. (in the subject I wanted to study no less). I experienced a lot of personal stress that semester, and while I ended up with an A- on the paper, it wasn't my best work. And although I earned an A in the class, the professor ignored my request for a letter of recommendation, and this has been the most painful rejection I've ever experienced. However, although my extenuating circumstances were valid, the fact is, my work was affected. So, I'm questioning how I would be able to manage the stress of a full graduate course load, teaching, research, etc. without my physical and/or mental health being affected. Additionally, I hate the idea of relocating and don't adjust well to change. It seems like academics must be comfortable with an itinerant lifestyle and constant change. Furthermore, I'm afraid of flying, and I know that one must travel for research/conferences (sometimes internationally) during a Ph.D. and throughout their career. At the same time, however, I'm passionate about my intended field and love research/writing (despite the setback in my last class). I also don't want to let this professor (or anyone) kill my ambitions. I do, however, want to make sure I think this through carefully. I should also mention that I"m a non-traditional student (37) and will probably be 38 by the time I start a master's program (if I"m accepted). I don't think it's ever too late to pursue one's dreams , but I do worry about the stress being more detrimental to my health in middle age. For example, even those in their 20's are stressed in grad. school, so I worry about how my health would be affected handling the stress of a Ph.D in my 40's, if I made it to that point. So, am I worrying too much, or does it sound like this career path isn't for me?
  2. What is the academic job market for Anthropology PhDs really like? How bad is it really? What do you do if you don't get a job? What is the situation in the different subfields? What about tier 1 universities in USA/UK? And what about lower ranked ones? Also, is there anybody here from India who has experienced the job search at home, whether they are trained here or abroad? I do not mean to snoop. I am considering grad school and finally an academic career in the social sciences, but I am trying to figure out exactly what I should go for. I find whatever little anthropology I know to be very interesting, but I have to take into account all the scare stories about the job market. Help would be really appreciated!
  3. I am in a dual-doctoral program that is set up such that you complete your doctor of physical therapy degree by the 3rd year and then complete your PhD afterwards with some overlap in the 2nd and 3rd years of the DPT program. I am finishing my 4th year and have completed my DPT, so my University now considers me a post-doc. Last summer I had applied for a Clinical and Translational Science Post-doc Fellowship (TL1) and an NIH F30 (predoctoral fellowship specific to dual-doctoral students). I was awarded and accepted the TL1 before I heard back about the F30, but now have also been offered the F30. Since the TL1 is a post-doc fellowship the stipend is approximately $24,000 higher than the pre-doc F30, it provides $8,000 in research funding (the F30 provides none), and it covers my full tuition (the F30 provides 60%). However, the TL1 is only for 2 years (I probably will need an additional 6m-1y after before I graduate, the F30 is for 3.5y which is well more than enough for me to graduate) and the F30 is far more prestigious since it is an individual national fellowship and would be much more beneficial if I apply for future NIH funding (like a K or R01) later on. I am leaning towards pursuing a career in industry, but have not ruled out a career in academia. I looked into my options with both the NIH and through my Univeristy to try to supplement the predoc F30 stipend to match my current post-doc stipend and that isn't a possibility. The NIH program officer called me today to tell me what a bad idea turning down the F30 would be if I ever want to apply to the NIH again, but a $32,000 difference is a big deal to me when I have 6 figure student loan debt, so I don't know that the prestige is worth the financial difference. Any thoughts would be greatly appreciated!
  4. Hello everyone, I've made a few posts on gradcafe that were unsuccessful, probably due to how wordy and niche the questions were.. Hopefully this question is more straightforward/understandable. I was wondering if there's any guideline for getting a sense of a PhD program's strength given that there's often 2 "types" of rankings-- overall ranking and the PhD/field's ranking. Specifically, a school may be well known in a general sense (i.e. Rice or Dartmouth), but are ranked below top 50 for the specific PhD program of interest (i.e. psychology). The reverse can also happen, where a school that isn't well known generally ranks top 10 in a field of choice. Which measure should you rely on, or how do you mediate differences between these rankings? Of course, rankings aren't the most important factor to consider. But I ask this because rankings can be one piece of information when deciding between programs, and because I hear academic employers take ranking of your PhD into account. Thank you!
  5. Hello all. So let me start by saying that I know the content of this post may seem childish to some, and that there might be a better place for it, but for now, I'm just posting it in this general forum because it doesn't seem to fit neatly anywhere else. I feel stupid even asking this, but I'm just gonna go for it: does anyone else worry that they've chosen the wrong path constantly? I'm currently in the process of applying to school for Social Work and out of nowhere I just got hit with this panic over whether this is actually what I want to do with my life. I've never ever been the kind of person that knew what they wanted to do, not because I'm not interested in anything, but because I'm interested in so many things! This led to me choosing a rather broad interdisciplinary program for my undergrad major and sticking with it even when I started to have doubts. I think I would have benefitted from taking some time off before or during college to figure out what I was most interested in, but I couldn't due to financial constraints and ended up with a BA that is more or less totally useless. It is what it is and I know I can't change the past, but I was feeling really confident in my choice of Social Work after three years of deliberation on the subject and now all of a sudden I'm doubting myself hardcore. I did briefly consider going to graduate school for history, mostly because my dad was pushing it on me. He really wanted me to become an academic because he never got the chance and for a while I thought that was what I wanted as well. I just couldn't settle on a field, which I know sounds moronic - the only reason to pursue a PhD, imho, is because you're fiercely passionate about a subject. Anyway, thankfully I dodged that bullet. For a while I was seriously interested in Religious Studies and Philosophy, which I did take some courses in during my undergrad, although they weren't designated as such. I realized pretty quickly, however, how much of an uphill battle it would be to get into a master's program for either of those given my irrelevant degree. This alone might not have deterred me, but the dismal job prospects outside of academia for both of those fields certainly did, as did the incredibly competitive nature of Philosophy grad programs. I also considered English and Psychology (I have a lot of interests, don't judge me!) before realizing that it would basically be the same situation for either of those fields, albeit maybe with the potential to teach AP classes in a high school if the whole PhD thing didn't work out. Here's the thing, and this is maybe gonna get me crucified on here but it's honestly the truth: I absolutely hate academia. I hate the competitiveness of it, the silly airs that people put on, the drama and the infighting. I even hate writing papers. When I wanted to be a professor it was because I wanted to teach. I love learning and I love discussing ideas with people, but I'm not terribly good at research and I knew that without any interest in being a hotshot with a ton of publications to my name my chances of getting tenure would essentially be nil. I KNOW all of the reasons why not, and yet. There's a part of me that just misses it, so much. I'm probably among the few people in the world whose favorite classes at college were honestly what most people would refer to as Gen Eds. My first few semesters at college I did really well. My professors loved me. I frequently had the experience of being in a class and feeling like it was essentially just a conversation between me and the professor, which I recognize is totally obnoxious for the other students and I would never do today but I was just so excited about the ideas I was engaging with that I could never shut up. My peers, by contrast, hated most of our core curriculum and couldn't wait to be done with the (admittedly rather involved) requirements. By the time I got to my junior year, I started to suspect that I was in the wrong program, but there was no way for me to change my major at that point and still graduate in four years, and taking longer than that wasn't an option, financially. I became gradually more depressed as I watched my peers enjoy their specializations and minors while I was still stuck in the past. My senior year, I had to write a thesis, but my heart wasn't in it and it ended up being 10 or 15 pages shorter than it was supposed to be. Basically, it's a miracle I graduated at all, let alone with a 3.5. This is getting really long, and I don't know that I have a question so much as I just wonder if anyone else feels this way. I think I might just be one of those people that's always going to have lingering doubts that I chose the wrong path in life, and maybe I just need to make my peace with that. I think I will enjoy Social Work and find it meaningful. It's not that I'm not interested in it. It's just that you only get one life, and I think I'm always gonna regret the paths I didn't take, that I didn't have time to do everything. Also, I'm scared that if I did change my mind and want to pursue an academic career in a different field someday, it might be too late. I'm already 25, which I feel is late to start a master's, and I'm obviously want to work in the field for a few years after my MSW before I consider any more schooling. I'm not interested in a Social Work Phd, and in fact am not even really sure what's involved in one. I'm doing this because I want to help people and I felt it was time for me to get started on some sort of career as opposed to just holding down a mess of different retail jobs for the majority of my 20's. Am I alone in feeling this way? Why is this so hard? I feel like such a loser because I'm 25 and I still don't know FOR SURE what I want to do with the rest of my life. I know that many people have multiple careers these days, but I've never really heard a story of someone transitioning into academia later in life. It seems like a young person's game, for obvious reasons. I'm gonna stop now because I've already written a novella but if anyone has any words of wisdom or just solidarity to express, I would really really appreciate it.
  6. I'm a recent JD grad, currently clerking for a judge (two years). Legal academia, particularly clinical legal teaching, would be my dream job. Would getting an L.L.M./Ph.D./S.J.D. in law help towards obtaining such a position?I was an OK but not great student in my JD program, and I know that hiring for academia can be very elitist.
  7. This is a frustrated rant: Academics keep saying that graduate students and faculty need to show "academic productivity". Well, what on earth does "academic productivity" even mean? What is the benchmark? *orange turtle wobbles off with her heavy shell while foaming at the mouth* I know it is different for different fields. Forget other fields, I can't even figure out my own! Gah! *orange turtle buries her head inside her heavy shell still foaming at the mouth* 2 hours later: *orange turtle falls asleep inside shell; it is cosy in here*
  8. I just gotta ask this because I am at wits' end and I am sure somebody somewhere has some answer or advice. Long story short, without going into too much detail: I was sexually harassed last year (propositions for sex; indirect threat of stalking) and then assaulted (non-rape) by TWO different men in / tangentially in my university. Both men tower over me size wise and I only reach their chest level as I am pretty small. One could easily bear hug me. (I mention the non-rape aspect as I don't want to make it sound like I can understand the trauma of those who have been raped and "hijack" their story and voice.) In my head, the two men have somehow now kinda amalgamated into one horribly bad person. I get nightmares about this one horrible big person coming out of the shadows and forcing himself on me while I silently scream. I am now taking several drugs so I can sleep through the night, including one which I am building tolerance to. Does anybody have suggestions to sleep without all these drugs? Does / did anyone have to deal with nightmares and found strategies? I have heard anxiety and panic attacks, for example, causes trouble sleeping. I also know people have nightmares about comprehensive exams. I am seeing a psychiatrist so the nightmares have lessened in intensity somewhat (also could be the drugs). I have not had any panic attacks while awake, thankfully, as my psychiatrist has helped me with strategies like breathing and grounding techniques which I have been very diligently following. However, I do need strategies that others have found helpful for sleeping in the meantime as I consciously work through this with my psychiatrist during my waking hours. Academia comes with many forms of nightmares because of the pressures and I'm hopeful people have suggestions. Help? Please?
  9. Advise desired for selecting a school. For context, I'm pursuing a PhD in environmental engineering with the hope of landing a career in academia. I know I still have some schools to visit but I'm trying to start figuring it out. School A is relatively well-known. It's in a neat location and feels like a good fit, like I could be happy there. I'm a little concerned that other students in the department aren't as ambitious as a whole (there are obviously exceptions). There's a very very well-known professor working there that is trying hard to recruit me for their project/team. I think I would love to work with them; they seem like an awesome mentor as well as researcher. They told me that they have enough grant money so I could have essentially total freedom on my project. Cost of living is definitely manageable with the ample aid they're providing me. Top 10 program. School B is extremely well-known and respected. Also an interesting location, but for different reasons. I feel like I would seriously struggle with financial stress throughout the duration of the program; no funding yet. Lots of interesting projects but not a strong connection with any particular faculty member. Have yet to visit, but I think I could fit in. It may help me job-wise down the road. Top 5 program. School C is well-known, more so in academia. Good location- most people seem to like it although I have yet to visit myself. Cost of living is reasonable, and with the financial aid it's definitely doable. I have had good communication with a faculty member there, but not on the same level as School A. They have a really neat joint program that I'm interested in and that that faculty member would encourage. Could also probably fit in. I think it has a slightly better reputation in academia than School A. Top 10 program. Thoughts?? Things to consider???
  10. Not sure if anyone's seen the recent Eidolon article on advice for Classics grad students, but I figured this would be a good place to post it for those of us currently in/soon to be in grad school: https://eidolon.pub/dont-eat-the-cubed-cheese-and-other-advice-for-classics-graduate-students-aece0a14607#.ilbqbz17a What do you guys think of the advice? Any tips of your own to add?
  11. Hi, This is my first post on the Grad Cafe. I'm encouraged by all of you guys because now I know that I'm not alone in this hectic time of grad applications. I am writing SOPs for MS/MA in statistics and MS data science. I eventually do want to pursue a PhD though I'm not sure which aspect of the mathematical sciences I want to be specialize in. My question is essentially: 1) What roles (software, data engineer, analyst etc)would MS data science graduates have in the industry? (whether government or commercial) 2) Would I easily have enough prior knowledge to pass qualifying exams as a Stat PHD candidate coming from a background with an MS data science degree? 3) What are the backgrounds of the data science masters cohorts? (what undergraduate majors, which industries, gpa, research interests etc.) 4) (Optional - for better insight) Finally, what would be your ranking of data science master programs and by what aspect are you ranking them (academic rigor, size of research projects, location etc.) I look forward to hearing your input.
  12. Does anyone have advice on starting, maintaining, and promoting an academic blog? I've been interested in it, but I'm scared to start one!
  13. I'm a first year psychology graduate student (specializing in cognitive neuroscience) at a pretty good grad school. I'm only a couple months in and I'm panicking- I wasn't 100% sure about grad school when I entered and now I feel even worse. I don't feel motivated/interested in the research I'm doing and now I'm thinking I should pursue a post-bacc to be pre med. But my friends and family say I should give it a little time to figure out what I want to research, etc. I'm 22, and people say that I just need time to figure it out, but I'm worried that after 5 years of a PhD program, I'm not going to be happy with a job in academia (if I get one.. and that's a big if). I've been thinking about applying to post bacc programs -- which would be roughly 2 years plus 4 years of med school (plus residency, etc). Or, I could wait until I get my master's, which would delay it another year. Would this be worth it?? Or should I just forget about this and stay in my program? In short, I have NO idea what to do. Help!
  14. Hello, After learning the importance of academic research experience and good academic performance to apply to a good PhD program in Marketing, I have decided to apply next year instead. The last six months have been an eye-opener and now, I know what I must do to make my application stronger. I have been working as an analyst in the digital marketing industry for quite some time now. My lack of academic research experience worries me a lot. I have spoken with many students and professors from different universities in the last couple of months. If I were to look out for research projects to work on along with a professor (even if it means spending weekends on it), how do I go about it? I have read a decent number of research papers of professors of similar interest but, is there a scope to work with them? How does it work in India? I'd really appreciate any leads or suggestions. I've always had the plans to move to academia but, I want to make this jump the right way. Regards, Roma
  15. I plan to enter an anthro graduate school program (MA+PhD) in September 2018, which means I have something of a ‘gap year situation’ ahead of me [not in a strict sense, as I’ve been working for a number of years now]. I want to use this unstructured time ahead the best way I can. If you were in my position, how would you spend these spare 12 months before grad school officially begins? How would you prepare for what’s ahead, what would you focus on? It goes without saying that I have already given these questions a lot of careful consideration, but I’m very curious to learn how others would approach this topic; especially, current PhD candidates, postdocs, and lecturers/professors. Knowing what you now know, if you could go back, how would you spend a spare year like that? Some background: My field is social/cultural anthropology. My ultimate goal (grad school and beyond) is to prepare a CV and a research portfolio, which will aid me in launching an academic career in Europe. I have a BA in anthropology and an unrelated MA, I currently freelance (unrelated field); I have plenty of spare time, and can arrange my schedule in whatever way I see fit. I live in a mid-size European city (not a capital); can’t move anywhere this year, but can likely do some limited traveling. There’s a small anthropology department here, but I’m not affiliated with it, and never was. My degree is from the US. I can speak the local language fairly well. The grad school (next year) will be in a different county, and learning the new language will be one of my key objectives this year. The language of instruction will be English, however. Note: Not sure if I made this clear, but I’m not looking for suggestions such as “travel for fun,” or “get a new hobby.” I want to use these 12 months in the most productive way possible.
  16. For a long time my background was in a VERY specialized field in the museum sector (conservation). There are VERY few jobs. After my husband and I moved to upstate New York I was extremely lucky to find a good job in my field, but it was an hour and a half drive one way from our house, which we were/are not willing to move from for various reasons. The drive eventually became physically, emotionally, and financially draining, and when the opportunity came up to leave to do a funded PhD I took it. Now, halfway through my program, I need to start thinking about what might be next, and suddenly find myself with several options where I have been used to having literally zero or none for my entire working life. I've been thinking/ talking with my husband about these options and thought that I would look here for some advice as well. Facts: I don't need to make a ton of money. My husband has a good job, but I do still need to pay off my student loans and have a fallback in case anything ever happens with his job. Moving IS NOT an option. The following options are being considered because there is potential for me to be able to do them in my current city. Please do not recommend that I join a nationwide TTP search or move to L.A. or something. I am under absolutely zero delusions that a tenure track position is going to be an option. Sure, if one comes up in my area that would be great, but my work is very specialized and tenure was never a hard goal for me. Similarly, I don't care about losing the "prestige" of academia, or about people potentially looking down on my for choosing "alt-ac." I have different priorities. We want something that will be flexible and allow me to spend time with/ be available for our (future) children. We have no hard and fast rules for this; we're not anti-daycare or anything like that, but we do want some options that will allow time off for vacations, some afternoons at home, family activities, etc. My husband travels for work and often has chunks of free time when we would be able to spend time together. I have contacts in both sectors, who have suggested that I consider these options. Basically the two main options are: A combination of part-time museum work and teaching adjunct courses. This will allow me to keep my feet in both worlds that I love: teaching and museums. When the kids are older this could potentially transition back into full-time museum work if I choose. One of the biggest motivations for doing the PhD was to get teaching experience and find out if I really loved it as much as I thought I would. I do, so continuing to teach would be great. Teaching at a private high school. This is appealing because there are MANY schools in my city. Several of them pride themselves on having an interdisciplinary curriculum which is exactly my wheelhouse. One of my contacts at a local school seemed very excited about my background, which combines art, chemistry/science, and history. I have always been attracted to the community atmosphere of K-12 schools (my mom was a teacher), so this option really appeals to me for that reason. Of course, the idea of long holiday and summer breaks is also quite appealing. Unfortunately, because of New York's rules, private schools would be my only option since I don't have a teaching certificate. I know what museums are like, so I think I am mostly looking for a conversation about the K-12 option. Has anyone gone from PhD to teaching high school? Do you know anyone who has done this? I understand that I am largely uninformed about how this might play out in the "real world." Feel free to inform me (that's why I am here), but please be kind about it. Thanks in advance for your thoughts!
  17. Hello everyone I'm interested in studying photography (including issues of class, power and the documentary genre). I was accepted to the IFA's MA program, and the UT Austin PhD American Studies program (which would have a strong photography angle). I am wait-listed at U Michigan-Ann Arbor's PhD art history program. I ultimately want to get a PhD, then teach and curate photography. IFA is tremendously respected, and would open a lot of doors (maybe more in curating than academia), but would cost $70,000. UT Austin is of course free. But do you think it 1.) is respected / opens doors and 2.) might allow me to keep a foot in both academic and curating worlds? I would appreciate any insight you might have. Thank you!
  18. I applied to several PhD programs in Electrical Engineering. A professor at my first choice university has shown interest in my application. He has over 15 years of research experience in a leading company in the field. He has a lot of citations on recent publications to show for his time in the industry. However, he joined the University in 2015 and so does not have any PhD alumni. He mentioned that he has secured funding so that I would not even have to work as a teacher assistant, which is a big plus. But ultimately, I would like hear the advice of more experienced PhD students or graduates, on whether doing the PhD under the supervision of a professor who is new to academia but widely experienced in industrial research is a good idea. Thanks!
  19. So this is more of a hunch or a question regarding how the admissions process works for sociology. So I've noticed, as have most of you that the Sociology Master's program is growing less and less frequent in the United States. More often than not now, maybe for funding issues or as a way to try to keep students at their current university, schools are doing away with offering a Master's degree in Sociology, in favor of the "masters on the way to your PhD." That being said, I've noticed a lot while browsing some of the better schools, that quite a few of the current students or admits have a master's degree from a different university already. So this has me wondering whether, despite the fact that they say you don't need a Master's degree to apply, if there is some kind of unspoken rule or pattern that favors the students who already have their masters. Now I realize that obviously most of the time, these students are more qualified than students who just have their bachelor's degree. They have more years of research experience typically; they often have a clearer idea of what they would like to study; and they have a master's level thesis to send in as their writing sample. So I guess my question is, with the breakdown/deconstruction of the separate master's program, how are schools making sure that each candidate is looked at fairly, or are they not? Does anyone else think this has the potential to create problems for students without Master's degrees, as fewer and fewer respected and ranked universities are offering terminal MA degrees?
  20. Hi folks, I am in a situation where I may either graduate in Spring/Summer 2017 (lack of funding), or in Spring/Summer 2018 (if secure a dissertation fellowship). Since neither alumni from my lab nor alumni from my program (STEM) typically go into academia to be a postdoc, I would like to know at what point of time should I do such or certain things, so that I can ultimately getting a post-doctoral research position that I want, presumably at the beginning of a Fall semester/quarter or as soon as I fulfilled all the requirements that complete my program. I think that inputs from those who are graduating / graduated from grad school can be gathered and combined into a "timeline", so that future viewers/readers of the forum can use it as a guidance. I would assumed that the first step is when "you about to start / started writing your dissertation", or "meet individuals / POI who you wanted to work for as a postdoc". Many thanks in advance! ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ - [If necessary] The summer before graduation -- prepare research and/or teaching statement(s) - July-December the year before graduation -- apply post-doctoral research fellowship(s)
  21. Hey Guys, What a wonderful time to be alive! Yet there are many decisions to be made! I have been offered admission by three MA programs: SAIS Washington DC; Fletcher; American University; Georgetown's Security Studies program—though I will hear from them next week, I feel it is in the bag. My predicament is the following. I am a non-American student whose main areas of interest are international relations and international security. I want to devote my life to academia (preferably based at the USA) but that requires a top-notch PhD. The programs I am most interested in are incidentally the most selective: Columbia, Harvard, Princeton, Chicago and Yale. My question for Grad Café’s devoted followers is the following: Which of the MA programs I mentioned above would best prepare me for the PhDs admissions I mentioned beneath? By now, I have realized that American admission committee’s do not focus exclusively on one item on the applicant’s CV. But since I want to walk the road towards tenure, my academic credentials will carry significant weight both for my PhD admission and my career. I might be too picky, but I am troubled with the following observations: - SAIS might be considered too policy- or economics-centered. - I have the feeling that American U is sometimes held as a step beneath or not “prestigious enough”. - Does Georgetown’s Security Studies program carry the same reputation as the MSFS/Foreign Service? What do you guys think? Thank you
  22. Hey Guys, What a wonderful time to be alive! Yet there are many decisions to be made! I have been offered admission by three MA programs: SAIS Washington DC; Fletcher; American University; Georgetown's Security Studies program—though I will hear from them next week, I feel it is in the bag. My predicament is the following. I am a non-American student whose main areas of interest are international relations and international security. I want to devote my life to academia (preferably based at the USA) but that requires a top-notch PhD. The programs I am most interested in are incidentally the most selective: Columbia, Harvard, Princeton, Chicago and Yale. My question for Grad Café’s devoted followers is the following: Which of the MA programs I mentioned above would best prepare me for the PhDs admissions I mentioned beneath? By now, I have realized that American admission committee’s do not focus exclusively on one item on the applicant’s CV. But since I want to walk the road towards tenure, my academic credentials will carry significant weight both for my PhD admission and my career. I might be too picky, but I am troubled with the following observations: - SAIS might be considered too policy- or economics-centered. - I have the feeling that American U is sometimes held as a step beneath or not “prestigious enough”. - Does Georgetown’s Security Studies program carry the same reputation as the MSFS/Foreign Service? What do you guys think?
  23. Hello everyone, I am a senior EE undergrad and I am going to study for PhD beginning from Fall 2016. I currently have offers from 4 schools and I am full of questions on which one would be the best for me. My offers are: - EPFL, EDIC PhD: 1 year fellowship - UC San Diego, ECE PhD: 3 years fellowship - UT Austin, ECE PhD: Funding decisions will be made in the following week as the Graduate Coordinator said. - Stanford, EE, Master’s: No funding, I do not think I will accept this offer. The schools that I did not get any response yet, are University of Michigan, USC and CMU. My research interests are statistical signal and image processing and there are professors and labs that I would love to work with, in all of the schools that I have offers from. Before getting any news from the schools, EPFL was my first choice due to its location. From what I have learnt from the internet, EPFL has a PhD system similar to U.S. in terms of quality, and it is close to my home country, which, I think, is the ideal case for me. However, I talked to some professors in my university and some of them suggested to me to choose a school in the U.S. if I want to be a professor in the future. Their main point was that the schools in the U.S. are known better worldwide, and the name-brand of the university matters in academia. The question that I am very curious about is whether EPFL is comparable to institutions such as UC San Diego, UT Austin or other “near-to-top” universities in the U.S or not. Would attending EPFL for my PhD hurt me when it comes to finding academic jobs in US or Europe? Another question I have is that, the department I have offer from at EPFL is "Computer and Communication Sciences", not EE. However, the topics that I am going to work on are the same as what I will work on if I go to an EE department at another university. Do you know whether the name of the PhD program not being EE would cause problems for me while looking for academic jobs in EE departments, after my graduation? I am unable find further information on these topics and any help and information you provide will be very important for me. Thank you all in advance.
  24. I am a US student looking to go to graduate school abroad. I have been told by some people that having a non-US degree will hurt my chances of becoming a professor in the US. However, many US universities that I have looked at have professors with non-US degrees. Would having a foreign degree necessarily hurt my chances? This is assuming that I will have stellar research experience, publications, etc by the time I receive my PhD. I am mostly looking at universities in the UK and Canada.
  25. Hello all, I have plans to become a scholar, focusing on systematic/constructive theology, for a post-secondary/graduate institution. I am also open to ministry if things don't pan out for getting a teaching job. I applied to 8 Mainline schools (Boston U, Candler, Claremont, Chicago, Duke, PTS, Vanderbilt, Yale; all in divinity schools/schools of theology), 2 Evangelical schools (Fuller, Wheaton), and a Seventh-day Adventist (SDA) Divinity School. I applied for MTS/MA/MAR's at most schools except I went for an MDiv at Chicago and the SDA school. With my first acceptance to Emory already announced, I have begun serious contemplation of what route I should take in preparing for a PhD. Honestly, before this acceptance letter I wasn't hoping for acceptance into these other schools (I had a little above average scores like a 3.68 GPA but I was just pessimistic I suppose). Now that I got this wonderful letter, which I am ecstatic about, I have begun to realize my dilemma. I see the benefits of going denominational as follows: 1. Networking within Adventism: I could network far more thoroughly within my denomination 2. Opens door for Pastoral Ministry: I'd obtain the basic ministerial credential for service in the church just in case I don't get a teaching job at the end of my later doctoral studies 3. Great financial aid: There would be fairly good financial aid (80% scholarship) 4. Work Experience: I am likely to be a TA or RA 5. Further grounding in SDA theology: Perhaps most importantly, I'd gain a more thorough understanding of my denomination than I have in my undergraduate studies 6. Impressive Faculty: Though Adventists don't tend to be thought leaders in today's theological climate, some amazing scholars are there, most of them having credentials from top tier universities and two faculty having degrees in second-tier institutions. Under them I would get to study from a progressive SDA perspective (so far I was only trained within a more conservative tradition). In addition, they do have connections to mainline universities, particularly Claremont, and they could possibly have sway in getting me into these places. 7. An open MDiv Curriculum: Their MDiv is fairly open-ended and creative. I could essentially use my electives to specialize in an area of study and take even more courses there than I would in an MTS. I would also be able to direct my ministry classes to post-modern ministry, ministry and the arts, and other creative possibilities. I could also get special training in post-secondary research and teaching there, giving me a great foundation in methodology and practice. Bonus: I'd get to live in Southern California, which I see as the greatest place in the universe at the moment. You can see the faculty's credentials all right on this page quickly if you'd like At the same time, I would have the opportunity of a lifetime to study at Emory and would enjoy the following benefits as I see them: 1. The opportunity to study under well-known scholars 2. With a name like Emory under my belt, I would likely enjoy greater likelihood in gaining admission to a PhD program. I intend to only apply to mainline schools like the ones mentioned above (Definitely not an SDA one; an Evangelical school is a minute possibility). 3. I would gain a thorough understanding of contemporary Christian issues from an authoritative institution that houses thought leaders and widely contributes to modern scholarship 4. Broader networking opportunities to up my chances of PhD admissions and future teaching posts (This shorter list reflects both my lack of awareness of my financial aid package and my lac of familiarity with specific opportunities at Emory) I see the following possibilities: 1. Go to Emory and then go straight to a PhD 2. Go to Emory now since I'm accepted and then go to Denominational School before a PhD (Would this defeat the purpose of going to a place like Emory for reputation and connections since the SDA school degree would be my last degree?) 3. Go to Denominational School and try for a PhD immediately after. If I can't get in apply to MTS at mainline school later (But would rejecting my acceptance from Emory now doom me from being able to get into the same program later?) Just to throw in some potential possibilities that may sway your assessment: - I'm strongly considering also pursuing an MA in Philosophy before graduate school since progressive SDA theology values philosophy highly. I would apply exclusively to top tier institutions and pursue it directly before my PhD studies, which again would be in systematic/constructive theology. - It is possible that I would do an MDiv/MBA combo at the SDA school, perhaps giving me a slight edge in PhD admissions. Side question: How hard is it to get into Emory's MTS program? I ask because I'm trying to gauge my chances for the other 9 schools as I await their response. Note: I'm completely comfortable going anywhere for school, I hold no reservations learning from anywhere! P.S. I didn't want to type the SDA school name out here because it might pop up unintentionally in search engines and attract unwanted attention to my dilemma
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