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Found 138 results

  1. Hi all, I am thinking about taking a graduate level class online through ENMU. I am currently on the waitlist and I'm hoping it will help me out. The director of the program said the one in the summer is 6-8 weeks long and moves quickly. I have all summer off bc I work for a school district. This should be perfect, right? I feel a little intimidated bc it's graduate level and fast paced. Has anyone taken a graduate level speech class like this online that is this short? Just looking for other ppls experience with this. Thank you!
  2. AppliedCogPsych

    Advice for I/O psych program

    I plan on applying to LaTech University in Louisiana for its I/O psych program. I already have an M.S. in Applied Cognition and Neuroscience with more of a focus on cognitive psychology. While obtaining the I/O degree I want to focus on doing stats as I've learned that is most marketable. I have some questions hopefully someone will answer them. 1. Is LaTech a good I/O psych school? 2. What should I focus on while in school? 3. What can I do to make myself enticing to I/O programs? 4. If anybody can share their experiences of going to school for I/O psych and the work they do in their industry? Thanks answering!!!
  3. Hey everyone, I aim to attend a masters program in religions, focus in East Asia (i.e. Hawaii or Toronto) or history of religions (i.e. Arizona or in a world where hell freezes over, University of Chicago), with the very end goal being University of Chicago's Tibetan Buddhist history. EDIT: I should add my first choice for my master's is FSU, since it's such a well funded program for those studying Chinese Buddhism. So, currently, I have a full-ride at school A(with the occasional loan that is never over 500ish dollars to pay for personal things, since I don't like living at home). I have a good Philosophy program here (focus in religious studies, non-theology) doubled with history, I am studying Chinese, and minoring in Peace & Conflict Studies. I am an honors students, and about to begin work on my senior thesis. I work a few leadership positions and my GPA is fine, I got a few Bs my Freshman year. I've presented research before. My professors have offered to do independent studies with me to bridge any gap I feel I am lacking where they can. That being said my school right now is very small, an open enrollment state school and doesn't really have a name for itself. It's no major state school like UMD or UCLA. I go here since I did so well in high school, I was able to get such good financial aid (plus a few other reasons that don't matter, it just goes that way sometimes). School B is a public honors college where I would have to take out loans, they have a similar program (I would take Japanese instead of Chinese). The coursework is more diverse, such as my current history department doesn't have a history outside of Europe or the US, while this school has a few more historians in other areas. I may be able to keep doing research, maybe not to the same extent to which I am now. This school has gotten people into UoC, Yale and even Oxford from my department but some of my professors have been saying the debt wasn't worth it and I can do that from here (which other professors are doubtful of). School C has offered me money to come be on a team for them, plus a good amount of academic scholarship. This is also a smaller state school, but it is above my current school. There would be loans my first semester but not much after that (I assume, it's out of state which would be new for me, maybe some loans for living). They have an awesome history department, with a chance to work with a historian's whose focus is in East Asia as my senior thesis. The honors college is much better here, I would get a chance for funding research (I fund my own and any travel that comes with presenting it). Plus, they pay for travel to other countries in the summer. They don't have a religions program, which is an issue when that's my graduate school area. I know academia and graduate school is hard and competitive, my dad is a professor so I've seen it from the inside, but I can't imagine doing anything else. I love teaching and researching, and maybe I am being compulsive planning this far ahead, but I would never forgive myself if I don't do what I can to go to the best graduate school. Maybe it's just because I was originally going to a much better school, at least planning, before some last minute issues with family that landed me here. Is a good master's program enough to bridge me into a T16 PhD program? Can I get into a good masters program from this open enrollment school that's very small with my CV and work I'm doing with my professors? Are loans and debt worth it? Sorry for the novel, everyone is telling me different stuff so I thought I would get input from people who have gone through graduate school recently, or just get a clearer picture of this. Thanks in advance.
  4. Hi all! I'm [supposedly] at the end of my studies, but I've had what I feel is an awful advisor/student experience and I’m concerned it’ll prevent me from finishing. I’m currently finishing writing up my dissertation. The majority of it is written, I completed my last science (work) chapter earlier this week and am now working on my introductory and concluding chapters. Short version: Problem: I haven’t gotten meaningful feedback on the last 60% of my research work and it stresses me out! Put short, my thesis is three mini-projects, with the last 2 being spin-offs from the first that was actually published. I submitted the work for my 2nd project last September (as a thesis chapter) and the work for my 3rd project last February. My main feedback, concerned the number of citations, formatting of the paper and introduction. Is this normal? I ask for feedback all.the.time regarding my research and I just don’t get any. I have no clue if my analysis is sound, techniques are good, just nothing. We actually had a group meeting, two of is other students presented on their research about 10minutes (They do get regular meetings and feedback). When it was time for me to go, It didn’t go so well. He asked me to present on a paper I found a week earlier, so I started with that before my research. Well….it was a 25 minute tangent lead by my advisor on why the people in the paper are wrong. I didn’t get to present on my work because they all had to go. It was really frustrating. On top of that, I can’t even manage a meeting with my advisor at best, maybe once every two weeks, because he is “to busy” (but he wants me to be in my office all day Monday-Friday, it’s crazy). It really has me worried. Any advice? He also does not want me to confide (or ask advice) from any of the other faculty concerning what is going on. I remember once, I was talking with the faculty head in the hallway (my advisor was running late for one of our meetings). While we were talking, I spotted my advisor standing awkwardly nearby, before he interrupted our conversation (rather abruptly) and sent me to his office while they talked. What do I do!? I literally feel helpless at this point.
  5. My bachelor's is a three year course, and I'm entering the third. I desperately want to get into a good grad school for behavioral economics. Here are my details: - GPA: Indian equivalent of 2:1 is stated as 3.3, and that is the requirement for most schools. My GPA is currently 3.51, but it will dip significantly because of a terrible semester owing to health issues and hospitalization (down to 3.0-ish, I assume). My college doesn't offer semester retakes. I have a year to build it back up, so I'm hoping to do well now. - TOEFL/GRE: Haven't taken yet - Subjects: Major in economics, minors in psychology and sociology, and my two semester electives are quant and physics. - Work: I've done one research assistantship under a renowned Indian economist, and one research project for an NGO. Both incorporated some aspect of Behavioral Economics and were great experiences. I have the time to do one more internship before I apply. - Academic projects: I have 6 unpublished projects in economics and psychology. (our college makes us work like crazy) - Publications: I have 2 journal publications, 2 op-eds, and I co-authored a chapter in a PhD. - Extra curriculars: I do not have any awards but I have been featured and recognized extensively for my music and social activism, and I co-founded a web based social activism portal. What can I do better? How do I move forward? Do I have the chance to get into a top school despite my GPA?
  6. I realize the application season is far from over for many of you, but I felt it's a good time to be retrospective. I wanted to share some of my anecdotes and qualitative data in hopes that it will help those in the future. Before I begin: this is based on my subjective experience and is not meant to be interpreted as prescriptive. I applied to a combination of I/O Psych and Measurement programs, thus this may be less relevant to some of you- I don't think that will be the case. Here are some thoughts looking back: Grad Cafe The beauty of Grad Cafe (though cliché) is the journey. Many applicants will not visit this place, many will avoid it like the plague, many will lurk. The exceptions provide invaluable information, they empathize, and even sympathize. This process is one that validates and demeans, it's not clean, knowing that you're not alone does so much. You learn about your "competition"- that they are just as smart and accomplished as you; they also are kind and helpful, I found solace in the fact that a deserving person was accepted when I was not. You start building your network here. These people may be in your cohort, may see you at a conference, or may score you a job in the future, so make it count. Clean the Results Survey... I did a project a while back trying to crowd-source some data to help those applying. I quickly realized that the results survey is a garbage-fire. All of the open-ended text boxes (i.e., program, school) are very unclean. It does have a predictive component but if someone types something incorrectly others will start getting that as a predictive option. It is also hard to find particular hybrid programs, so I think a tagging taxonomy would bode well. I've emailed the admins about this. The benefit of Grad Cafe can be improved by cleaning the user-experience. This would be a good place for sourcing how grad students deal with rejection or giving particular programs a profile in terms of when they respond to students. You'd need to control for self-selection, but I see this providing a huge benefit to society. Admins clean up the response strings and make the tag structure more defined....constructive feedback, don't delete this post. Initial Email -The most underestimated part of the application process Most of us are highly conscientious so bugging a person we don't know may be excruciating. Funding is the name of the game for many programs. If you apply to the wrong lab it doesn't matter how strong of an applicant you are. Take the time to send an email to figure out who is planning on taking students. I also find that emailing the current students is both less intimidating and more insightful so do not shy away from this. Another thing this will help is your personal statement. I spent so much time specifying advisers just to find out that some of the programs don't want you working with just one person. The program websites are always filled with obsolete information, get current information from those living it. GRE/GPA - A perfect GRE/GPA score will not guarantee your acceptance If this was the case no program would have an interview portion nor would you have to submit CVs and Personal Statements. Obviously, programs will use the quantitative metrics (GPA and GRE) when convenient, so in the beginning when the pool is large. Programs may get 300 applicants so selecting 30 to interview would be tedious without a common scale. The first filter will be a quantitative metric and if you aren't above average...none of your other qualifications is going to fix that. You can't change your GPA but you can improve your GRE. I've heard all sorts of metrics: (Quant + Verbal) * GPA, sometimes programs will weigh verbal more or quant more, you never know. You want to make the first cut, so don't think you need the highest score because chances are you won't have it. Shoot for that 75th-80th percentile. Some of you may think that it is impossible but it's not, this is coming from someone that increased their GRE score by 20 points in a short amount of time. If you're struggling go here. The GRE is based upon adaptive Item Response Theory (IRT) so focus on increasing your mastery of the more difficult questions. Personal Statement - Don't overthink it I spent most of my time doing these. I'm a terrible writer. There is no special sauce, no formula. Just don't tell a 2-page story about your grandma dying. I do suggest demonstrating that you know how to craft a research idea relevant to your person of interest. Also if you see research that they've done where the findings relate to an experience you've had....golden. I asked over 20 professors (from different programs) if they had to choose just one: GPA/GRE, Personal Statement & Recommendations, or CV and Research experience to select a candidate, which would they choose? No one said personal statement. Once again I'm in the area of I/O, so other areas may differ but none of us are in Creative Writing. Research/CV -You do research in a PhD program, so research experience is critical This is the area I lack. My estimation is that it is why I got rejected from places, and is what sets apart the candidates after the GRE/GPA hurdle. I would really love to see the stats for applicants that got 75th percentile on the GRE with publications versus an applicant that is in the 99th percentile without research experience. A vast majority of the professors I spoke to said if they had to select a candidate based on 1 metric that they would choose CV and Research experience. It makes sense because students will be doing research. Don't underestimate how you layout your research experience on your CV. If you can get on MTurk and code someone's data or if you can present to a small clinic or non-profit, do it. Interviews & Recruitment Days - It's all about the questions. Don't be vanilla. I didn't dress the best. I'm sure I creeped out all the current students and applicants, but they remembered me. Ask good questions, I can't emphasize this enough. 100% of the interview/recruitment days I went to accepted me afterwards. I definitely wasn't the smartest person there, but I asked good questions. Don't ask things you can learn from a follow-up email or on the website. Act like you're about to marry them, or that you're on a Tinder date 4 glasses of wine in. Some examples (all of which I've used): For students: What would you improve about your program? What class was a waste of time? What are 3 things your adviser can do better? If you had to punish someone deeply, what professor would you handcuff them to? How much time have you spend off-campus with those in your cohort? How much of your weekend is spent doing work? My favorite: If all of the faculty participated in the Amazing Race with a clone of a generic student, who would you put your money on? Who would drop out? For faculty: What are three adjectives your students would use to describe you? What is a unique skill you offer that the other faculty do not? If you could add a course from the core-curriculum, which would you pick? In your opinion what proportion of a PhD student's time should be spent in the following areas: Assistantship, Coursework, Research, Personal Life? From your perspective what is the biggest social challenge? emotional challenge? and financial challenge? a student faces in grad school. One love... Thank you all,
  7. Greetings~ I'm in a one year masters program, which I felt didn't give me enough time to prepare a successful PhD app [making a writing sample, getting letters of recommendation, really articulating what I want from a PhD program or faculty advisor, etc]. I will be taking a gap year before applying for PhDs in American Lit. I'll be staying in the same city, Pittsburgh, which has plenty of opportunities for English MAs. I'm not too worried about finding the best work for me, but I'm curious-- what are others doing for a gap year? If you did take a gap year, what did you do that made it successful? How did you balance work and preparation for applications? Were you very worried about finding something closely related to your field of study, or is Starbucks just fine? What do you think are the biggest differences between a gap year immediately after undergrad and gap years that are between graduate degrees?
  8. Hi everyone! So, I'm aiming to apply for grad school this fall in hopes of starting a master's program in Fall 2019. I want to begin brainstorming ideas for my letter of intent/statement of purpose. I currently work as an instructional aide in a day class at a school. The students I work with have emotional/behavioral disturbances (EBD). I know at least one student in my class has speech every week. I've also worked with students with Autism at a high school on occasion. Here is my question: Will I be able to connect my experiences as an aide to EBD students with speech-language pathology? Is my experience as an aide relevant to the field? I'm beginning to look for articles from ASHA that discuss communicative disorders in children and teenagers with EBD. I hope that doing research will help me connect my current work experience with speech. I want to show an admissions committee that I can relate my work/job duties as an aide to speech. I would love some advice/wisdom/thoughts; all of that good stuff! Thank you
  9. I'm applying to grad school this fall and I'm extremely nervous! Do you have any advice that you wish someone had told you when you were applying? Thanks in advance!
  10. Philsgross

    Fit vs very close to home

    Any advice for choosing between a better fit, but 5-10 hours from home and a school that is a good fit, but very close to home and close to where you went to undergrad (people in the area you know)? Looking to gauge the value of being close if anyone has experience with that one way or the other. Thanks!
  11. Leo9

    NEGOTIATE or WIN A LOTTERY

    HIIIIIII EVERYONE I GOT admitted to PENN STATE and was offered 25k for 2 years, (12,250$ per year) plus 2,500K for any internship and such, I am really grateful for the offer, but i need 100% funding in order to attend since the school's estimated cost is around 50K for one year (I am an INTERNATIONAL Student), I DONT KNOW WHAT TO DO, and yes i have researched every database, website on the internet for scholarships and because of various reasons, age, work experience, country residency, major and stuff there was no suitable scholarship out there, THEREFORE, i have no choice but to TRY negotiate with the school if any of you have negotiated before, please provide me tips ANY ADVICE will DO
  12. emmazeee

    Picking a Program

    Hi, everyone! I am currently a third year undergraduate student majoring in neuroscience who plans on going to graduate school and getting my PhD when I finish my undergraduate education. I have been looking at schools and different programs, but am having trouble picking which ones would be best for me. I know that I like research, but part of my problem is that my research interests are very broad. I believe that I am most interested in differences in behavior and the biological reasons/mechanisms behind these behaviors. I have mostly considered getting my PhD in either neuroscience or in psychology, but have more recently been considering that this may fit a biology PhD, too. What type of program do you think I would find the most relevant labs focused on this? Or does anyone have any advice that would help me to make the distinction between what type of program would be a good fit for me? Thank you!
  13. Rose-Colored Dasein

    Asking Application Status

    As far as I am concerned, anyone who has not received a rejection is functionally on a "hidden waitlist." Would sending an email asking about my application status be good, bad, or neutral for such an application? I don't see how it could be significantly good or bad. Yes, it expresses interest, but I don't think it expresses interest significantly more than the time and money that is put into an application. Sure, it may make you look desperate; but committees surely realize that even applicants who have been accepted elsewhere want to consider all their options.
  14. Hi all, I know there are a plethora of these posts out there, but they've seemed pretty helpful and I am, as the title states, overwhelmed. The run-down: I'm a current undergrad (psychology major and linguistics minor) set to graduate this June at UCSD; my GPA isn't the most stellar (3.5 Cumulative, 3.6 Psych) and I've yet to take the GRE. I ended up finishing all my coursework a year early due to funds and I'm planning to use that "fourth" year as a gap year so I can continue working at the two labs I'm currently involved in and figure out if I want to pursue psycholinguistics/ applied psych or school psych. One is more clinical and I mostly just help monitor assessments on children at risk for autism, while the other is more research-based and is focused on psycholinguistics, but I haven't been involved in any presentations or publications as of current. Volunteer-wise, I help out at the LGBTQ center on campus and I'm on the board for an org that sends undergrad volunteers out to partners schools around the city to work in classrooms and after-school programs. The problem(s): I'd really like to go to grad school in the future, but I feel like my experience and whatnot is inadequate compared to what I've seen from other applicants. As I mentioned before, I'll be taking the 2018-2019 year to continue working at my UG labs, but other than that I'm kind of lost. I definitely have to find a full-time job to support myself since I'm not originally from the area and have to rely on my own funds to repay my loans and rent, but relevant jobs I have found in psychology or teaching have all required reliable transportation ( aka a car ), which I don't have right now. I definitely don't mind just taking any job to pay the bills and beefing up my resume with volunteer experience, though. What should I do in my gap year to spruce up my admission chances? Is it important for my FT job to be relevant to psychology- in other words, will it hurt my application if it isn't? I appreciate any suggestions, advice, or comments!
  15. Dviouz

    Note-taking Help

    Hi all, I think this may just be my anxiety and excitement about grad school setting in, but I see a lot of people are saying that they use laptops to take notes and associated work in grad school. Personally, I've always handwritten notes, having always felt awkward or more distractible if I use my computer. I have a laptop that I plan on using for PDFs and articles, but otherwise was planning on buying some notebooks for classes and meetings. So, my question is: How usual is it to take handwritten notes?
  16. Rose-Colored Dasein

    Asking Application Status

    As far as I am concerned, anyone who has not received a rejection is functionally on a "hidden waitlist." Would sending an email asking about my application status be good, bad, or neutral for such an application? I don't see how it could be significantly good or bad. Yes, it expresses interest, but I don't think it expresses interest significantly more than the time and money that is put into an application. Sure, it may make you look desperate; but committees surely realize that even applicants who have been accepted elsewhere want to consider all their options.
  17. Hello everyone, I am hoping to apply to a graduate program in anthropology this calendar year. My research interests, broadly speaking, involve perceptions ofcommunal identity in South Asia and its intersection with historical, political, religious, and ideological processes. However, I am also interested in religion, spirituality, and cultural interpretations of the "human journey". Given these broad topics and my interest in South Asia, I am looking for recommendations for suitable graduate programs to which I might apply. Any feedback would be appreciated. Thank you! Austin J.
  18. Hey all, I'm starting to draft my statement of purpose and was wondering if any of you had any advice about the general structure of how the statement should look. It'd be great to hear any other advice as to what you believe the the essential aspects of a successful statement are Applying to sociology PhD programs and a couple of MA programs in theology, but would be happy to hear advice from those outside of these disiciplines as well. Thanks in advance!
  19. Hi, I just received my notification of admission to the Colorado School of Public Health. I applied because I like the location and their MPH program didn't require prior work experience. The school is a collaboration between UC Boulder, UC Denver, and University of Northern Colorado. I'm from Texas, and therefore don't have any idea of what the general perception of the school is. Is it seen as an advantage to have the resources of three separate schools available, or is it not as widely respected as a degree from one specific university (ex. MPH from the University of Texas)? I'm super excited to be admitted and look forward to potentially attending, but I don't want to get myself into a two year program if it's not a well-respected school. Let me know what you think about CSPH! Thanks, Maddie
  20. What do you think is the best way to go about soliciting application feedback from departments? I was wondering how best to reach out to universities in order to minimize the intrusion and maximize the possibility of getting useful information. (e.g., do you consider it better to write directly to the department, or instead to the graduate admissions office? Do you have opinions as to the best time to ask for feedback? etc, etc.) At this point I'm planning on a second admissions cycle, and even if I get accepted somewhere last minute, I'd like to open the discussion for any lurkers who may be facing a shutout in the next few weeks.
  21. I applied to Columbia’s PhD program for biomedical engineering and got an interview invite. It’s my top choice and I didn’t think it was going to work out, so I was ecstatic to hear from them. Since I got the email though, my stress levels have steadily gone up as I realized that this interview was a step in the right direction but no guarantee of admission. I want to be as well-prepared as possible, and I was wondering if anyone had advice/information on how Columbia’s interview process goes? Should I expect to talk about my own research experience or POI’s? Is it more casual or will it involve an intense technical interview? Are my chances of getting in relatively high or is it like a 50/50? Anything that would help me figure out where I stand and/or how to best prepare for this would be appreciated!
  22. Hi, I'm in my second semester as a Ph.D. student in Comparative Literature. I know some people might think that it's too early for me to start worrying about what to do to get hired, others might be thinking that it's never too early, others might be saying "you're a comparative lit. major, there are no jobs" lol, but please just stick with me a moment. I'm looking for advice on how I can become a more competitive applicant when applying for assistant professor jobs (and similar jobs) after I finish my Ph.D. I'm technically first-generation college student (my parents dropped out of college, and my much older sister went to college later through a continuing studies program and received a masters online. However, she doesn't work in academia) so I'm pretty lost here about how all of this works and what's attractive to universities. I'm trying to figure out what I can do to stand out. I've been told that I should go to conferences, so I applied to two and got accepted. Are conferences helpful or do you feel like it doesn't make much of a difference? Should I try publishing more? Researching (you know, outside of my future dissertation work)? If so, how do I start approaching professors or institutions, in general, to start doing that? After graduation, should I apply to a post-doc program? If so, do you know of any stand out ones that I should aim for or even what people look for when hiring post-docs or do you just feel like post-docs are unnecessary? My fellowship requires me to teach one semester gratis. Should I attempt at teaching more? Older students in my department have suggested getting a masters in another department (i.e. English, French, Anthropology, Theatre, etc.) to further diversify myself and make more valuable connections, but I'm not sure if tagging on another year or two to finish another degree for the sake of networking is that beneficial especially when comparative literature programs require you to take courses outside of your department anyway. Should I start building more experiences outside of academia (In undergrad, I was an EIC of a publication for a year, I've also worked in publishing, tutoring, mentoring, and led a social justice/community service non-profit organization for a year, and I minored and worked in social media for a bit-- should I keep doing more things like that in grad school or is it time to refocus and just build on one or two things?) If I sound really young, lost, and a little overwhelmed, it's because I am. I graduated from a private university with a degree in English (writing) in three years and was accepted straight-way into this Ph.D. program when I was 20 going on 21 years old. My program requires 48-course credits, after this semester (I entered in Fall 2017 right now I'm in Spring 2018 semester) I would have 24 credits so I'm approaching that halfway mark with my coursework (I probably need to slow down a bit, but I can't hold a job on this fellowship minus departmental related research/internships relevant to my career so I don't have anything really going on at the moment). I'm required to take a minimum 9 credits Fall/Spring each and a minimum 6 credits in the summer so I'll be at 30 credits when the Fall 2018 semester commences. I'm not at a prestigious ivy league school; I'm in a very small program at a pretty large public university. I don't feel like me being young with a good fellowship is enough to really stand out. So if anyone knows about ways I can further build my CV and experiences to become a better applicant for future jobs, that info would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance!
  23. elodin

    Terminal M.A. Advice

    Hey folks, I'll likely be entering a terminal M.A. program this Fall, coming from an engineering background and a few years in industry. Do those of you with experience have any advice to share? Some specific questions: What is the best way to test the hypothesis that a career in philosophy is the right fit? Would it make sense to do some independent study/research-for-credit in the first year, towards a stronger writing sample? Or, is it wiser to invest time gaining a broad philosophical eduction? It seems like the latter is more in the spirit of MA programs, but that the former would be more strategic. Did you find the environment to be competitive? I see some programs consistently place just 1 student in a top 10 PGR program. I wonder whether this is largely a function of one's overall rank in the class. What do you wish you had discussed with/learned from your advisor in the first year? Anything in particular that you wish you had known before entering? Thanks in advance!
  24. Hey all! I just joined GradCafe, and I am so stoked but also nervous about the fact that applying for grad schools is just around the corner. Right now I am feeling so nervous because I know my credentials are not where they need to be. I'm graduating early in December, but since most grad schools don't do spring start and heading straight to grad school with no break would be INSANE, I am planning on finishing out my lease here. Then I'll be applying for summer and fall start dates at multiple schools. I have a few school ideas, which I'll state down below. I plan to earn a Masters in Social Work, potentially with a concentration in mental health. First, I wanted to give you an idea of my stats (no judgment--from the threads I have read so many of you have intensive experience and stellar GPAs :/ ): Undergraduate Degree @ University of South Carolina -- Experimental Psychology major with two minors: Social Work; Counselor Education GPA - 3.0 overall, should be closer to a 3.1 by the time I graduate (Yes, I know, it's low...it's not horrible, but if college had been a little less rocky I could have done super well ) Member of Psi Chi, International Honors Society in Psychology Member of a panhellenic sorority through which I have volunteered and participated in philanthropy events Was in charge of a philanthropy within my sorority where sisters help a local blind man with every day tasks This is it so far, however I have a few plans under my belt that I am almost positive I can follow through with: This semester I will be completing at least 45 service hours with a local organization that provides lower-income individuals with housing (definitely happening, it's a part of a practicum I'm taking) If all goes well, I plan to intern in Rome for 8 weeks with a social service organization this summer. I should be working about 20 hours a week. I plan to join Delta Alpha Pi, an Honors Society for people with disabilities (I have severe depression which has contributed to my mediocre GPA). I plan to get involved with the Undergraduate Social Work Student Association at my school. I haven't taken the GRE yet, so it could definitely still be a factor in boosting the impressiveness of my application. I am a strong reader and writer. If anyone has specific tips about the GRE, please let me know! ^^^So this is what I plan to achieve before I have to do applications (in the fall for the summer 2019 start, and in the winter for the fall 2019 start I suppose). For some reason, I have had a hard time finding paid opportunities/internships in the city of Columbia that are geared towards psychology or social work. I am going to keep looking, but the opportunities seem few and far between. That being said...what do you all think? What are some things you suggest I do, between now and the time I apply, to make my application as impressive as possible? I know I can't take back my GPA, but I can try to make up for it in other respects. From what I have read on here, those with low GPAs have been able to impress graduate schools in other ways. Again, if yo've got tips, let me know! Lastly, I wanted to list some schools that I am considering. I am going to rank them in order of my interest right now. If any of you know anything about these school's admission rates or have any specific insider info about a school, PLEASE contact me. I would love to get in touch with some of you and potentially ease my fears about applying for grad school! Here's my list: 1. University of Denver 2. San Diego State University 3. University of Southern California (the other USC...hehe) 4. Arizona State University 5. Florida International University and some maybes: Cal State - Long Beach; San Jose State University; Metropolitan State University of Denver As you can see, I really want to go far away and preferably out west (I've lived in SC my entire life). I am not sure about the admission rates of these schools, though I have heard that SDSU and USC are more competitive. I would love to hear thoughts on your experience with applying (especially to any of the schools above), selectiveness of these schools, my potential chances of getting in, and their quality of education. Thank you for anyone who actually took the time to read all of this!!! Any help at all would be so appreciated, even if it is constructive criticism. ~PeaceLoveSocialWork~
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