Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'advisor'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Comment Card
    • Announcements
    • Comments, Questions, Etc.
  • The Cafe
    • City Guide
    • IHOG: International House of Grads
    • The Lobby
  • Applying to Graduate School
    • The April 15th is this week! Freak-out forum.
    • Applications
    • Questions and Answers
    • Waiting it Out
    • Decisions, Decisions
    • The Bank
  • Grad School Life
    • Meet and Greet
    • Officially Grads
    • Coursework, Advising, and Exams
    • Research
    • Teaching
    • Writing, Presenting and Publishing
    • Jobs
  • The Menu
    • Applied Sciences & Mathematics
    • Arts
    • Humanities
    • Interdisciplinary Studies
    • Life Sciences
    • Physical Sciences
    • Professional Programs
    • Social Sciences

Blogs

  • An Optimist's PhD Blog
  • coyabean's Blog
  • Saved for a Rainy Day
  • To infinity and beyond
  • captiv8ed's Blog
  • Pea-Jay's Educational Journey
  • Procrastinating
  • alexis' Blog
  • grassroots and bamboo shoots.
  • Ridgey's blog
  • ScreamingHairyArmadillo's Blog
  • amyeray's Blog
  • Blemo Girl's Guide to Grad School
  • Psychdork's Blog
  • missesENG's Blog
  • bgk's Blog
  • Tall Chai Latte's blog
  • PhD is for Chumps
  • bloggin'
  • NY or KY
  • Deadlines Blog Ferment
  • Going All In
  • In Itinere ad Eruditus
  • Adventures in Grad School-ing
  • inafuturelife
  • The Alchemist's Path
  • The Rocking Blog
  • And Here We Go!
  • Presbygeek's Blog
  • zennin' it
  • Magical Mystery Tour
  • A Beggar's Blog
  • A Senseless Game
  • Jumping into the Fray
  • Asian Studies Masters
  • Around the Block Again
  • A complicated affair
  • Click My Heels Three Times and Get In
  • dimanche0829's Blog
  • Computer Science Crossed Fingers
  • To the Lighthouse
  • Blog of Abnormally Aberrant
  • MissMoneyJenny's Blog
  • Two Masters, an Archive and Tea
  • 20/20 Hindsight
  • Right Now I'm A-Roaming
  • A Future Historian's Journey to PhD
  • St Andrews Lynx's Blog
  • Amerz's Blog
  • Musings of a Biotech Babe
  • TheFez's Blog
  • PhD, Please!
  • Blooming Ecologist
  • Brittle Ductile Transitions
  • Pleiotropic Notions
  • EdTech Enthusiast
  • The Many Flavors of Rhetoric
  • Expanding Horizons
  • Yes, and...
  • Flailing Upward
  • Traumatized, Exhausted, and Still Going
  • Straight Outta Undergrad!

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Pronouns


Location


Interests


Program

Found 25 results

  1. Hi everybody! This is my first time posting to this forum so I hope I'm doing this correctly. I am about to begin studying for my PhD Qualifying Exams in Art History, and I am trying to get a sense of the average number of books Art History students read for exams in other graduate programs. The professors in my department have ZERO consistency amongst each other when assigning book lists. Lists range anywhere from 50 to 300 books, with 4 month reading period. When the graduate students tried to address this discrepancy in a meeting with our Director of Graduate Studies, we were told "This is how it's always been done," and "Exams are supposed to drive you crazy." The general lack of respect for mental health in my department is an issue for another day. Unfortunately, my advisor is on the higher end of the spectrum, and my current major list is about 250 books long. I am majoring in Italian baroque art, and she has asked me to read literature spanning between 1400-1800, in addition to literature on France and Spain. She doesn't expect me to read every book in detail, and instead wants me to understand how each book has contributed to the field. This is what she was asked to do as a student at Columbia in the 90s, and insists that this is the best way to proceed. Naturally, I am a bit overwhelmed about all of this, and I could really use some perspective on how other art history departments structure exams. Any advice on how to study this much material in 4 months would also be greatly appreciated. Thank you!
  2. Next week, I have to interview faculty interested in serving as either an advisor or second reader to my thesis (MA English Lit. btw). (1) What questions should I ask them to ensure that we will work well together? (2) What other advice do you have for this process? Thanks
  3. Some people say that your mentor is EVERYTHING in grad school. How important is it to stick with a big, influential name who knows and wants me, in a really bad department/school, when he seems to have some control issues that could impact our working relationship over the next 4 years? Here is the TL;DR version for those who get frustrated by the tons of text that follow : Program A: Great metro area; low program ranking; my advisor is the big kahuna in the department and field but he has some troubling personality quirks; he's the only faculty member to work with in my dept.; I'm already set up/would not have to move; I'm already well known and respected in the department; students tend to leave with very publications; my mentor has put his name on the line for me here and would take it personally if I leave. Program B: Excellent reputation and curriculum; very high ranking; many faculty to work with an opportunity for collaboration; no one-perfect-faculty-member-fit for me; strong methods training; would have to move and create new relationships with faculty and prove my reliability; somewhat geographically isolated but 3-hour drive to major cities; strong department culture of cohesiveness; attending would burn bridges with my current mentor. *** I'm in my last semester of a master's program in a field at a poorly-ranked program, but with an advisor who is an influential name and who knows everybody, everywhere. (Why is such an important person at a crappy school? We're in DC, and he likes living here so that he can skip down to Capitol Hill to testify or to sit with the policymakers and come up with solutions - when they actually do that stuff.) I came to this school specifically so I could work with him, even though he doesn't normally work with masters students. I emailed him relentlessly before and after I was admitted, and then campaigned to be let into one of his theory-based PhD-level courses in order to prove myself to him. It worked; we are now co-authors on a forthcoming paper, and he is the one who told me to apply for a PhD. He was so adamant that I do so that he put himself on our admissions committee to "ensure" that I was accepted to our doctoral program. He is my biggest advocate. This person comes with a very particular set of difficult personal characteristics, however. As a family man, he seems unable to avoid giving into his paternal instinct with his mentees (all of whom are female). He gives unsolicited advice on our personal lives and situations, gets angry with us when we do not take his advice, and then does not seem to understand why we get upset with him. As someone with a brilliant mind and ivy pedigree, I also think he is just accustomed to being the smartest person in a room, and he really does think he know what's in our best interest better than we do. Although I believe it comes from a good place, the end result is a peculiar kind of toxicity: I admire him, but I am 'afraid' of him in that I know better than to cross him, and I am reluctant to pitch my research ideas because so few are 'good enough' for him to support. I got into my home institution, of course, but I have another offer that is at an objectively better institution (he didn't want to write me a LoR, but eventually did. Whole other story). If I take my current advisor out of the equation, I pick the other school in a heart-beat. But given this person's reputation, prestige within our field, nearly identical interests to mine, and the fact that he has personally invested so much in me so far - I'm reluctant to leave him. This week I told him I was leaning toward leaving, and we spent an hour arguing, as he was certain I would be "making a huge mistake" if I leave. He said he would take me off all of our current projects if I do go, and he said, "I feel like I'm giving you the keys to a Ferrari, and you just want to go drive a Mercedes ." Funding is basically the same at both schools, but there is a big difference in the cost of living in DC vs. NY state. Here is some information about these two programs. Program A: At my current school, in DC. It has a fairly low ranking (21/32). My mentor's pros/cons I detailed above. The department is poorly organized, no one in it likes each other, and only 2-3 people actively publish (there are a TON of coasters). The doctoral students report no sense of community within cohorts or within the department, and several have complained of a kind of boys club mentality (no tenured women faculty, the rare male student is empowered and the female students are discouraged from doing innovative work). There are 3 academic tracks, and mine is the smallest and most devalued. In fact, my mentor is the only professor that teaches in it. That means that he is the only person with whom I could collaborate, and the only one to have on my comp and dissertation committees. The department doesn't permit us to invite people from outside institutions, or even from other departments within the school. When I have requested they hire more faculty for my track, they say it might be possible in 2-3 years. We have notoriously poor methods training. We are located in DC, however, so that opens up certain professional opportunities, and means that we can meet many of the fancy speakers who come to the school. Doctoral students generally graduate with only 1-2 publications, usually co-authored with faculty or another student, and they have been described to me as "solo missions" without much/any support from the department. Graduates who work with MY advisor are generally well-placed into academic positions; however, the other grads tend to go into government, non-profits, or else I have no idea where. Program B: Located in upstate NY; no national name recognition (school itself is considered middling overall, but my program is their star jewel.) It has a high ranking (consistently 2/32). Out of the faculty of 16, there are 10 who share overlapping interests with me. No one person is a perfect "fit", but, the department is very big on the whole "it takes a department to raise a PhD student." You don't work on your advisor's work so much as that person guides you to figure out the logisitics of projects YOU want to lead, and then gives you advice on how to accomplish it. It's a highly collaborative department - everyone works with one another: faculty-faculty, faculty-student, student-student. There is a strong culture of inclusiveness, very high productivity, and teamwork. Everyone publishes constantly, and the school houses two of the top journals in our field. The faculty is 1/3 women, most of whom are tenured. Students tend to graduate with anywhere from 4-10 publications, depending on how hard they push themselves. Graduates are generally well-placed. There are also unsubstantiated whisperings that there were sexual harrassment issues in the past. When I have asked their current female students directly, though, they claim to know nothing about it. It could be just a rumor, or it could be something that happened years ago and was dealt with. My main reason for wanting to go there - aside from the strong sense of community they create - is their incredible methods program. They are very strong in quant, and invest in making sure that their grads are, too. They also offer other types of research methodology training. I believe I would emerge from their program a much stronger researcher, overall. As my current mentor points out, though, I would be starting from zero there and would have to "prove myself" to the faculty all over again. It's also upstate NY, which means lots of cold and snow, but also, the Adirondacks, and proximity to other lovely places like Vermont, Boston, NYC, Montreal, etc. There is the issue of the frigid cold and snow, but I'm originally from Chicago, and I could tough it out again. Cost of living is very decent there, though, and I could comfortably live alone on the stipend - whereas in DC, I would likely continue living in a group house situation (which I am loathe to do). Most significantly, for me, going to Program B would likely mean that my mentor would cut off any possibilities of future collaboration between us, and I'd be severed from our current projects. It would feel like a great personal blow to lose him. For all of his faults (and everyone has some), I like him personally, and I wouldn't have come this far without his encouragement and mentorship. I don't want him to feel that he invested all of this in me for no personal ROI. *** I'm trying to talk to him again this week to see if he would walk back this whole 'punishment' thing (my word, based on how it feels). He did send me a note of apology after our uncomfortable talk, so I think we may be on the verge of negotiating a detente. However, there is only one week left to decide, so... figuring this out needs to happen ASAP! Thanks for any feedback/ideas!
  4. Hi all! I'm [supposedly] at the end of my studies, but I've had what I feel is an awful advisor/student experience and I’m concerned it’ll prevent me from finishing. I’m currently finishing writing up my dissertation. The majority of it is written, I completed my last science (work) chapter earlier this week and am now working on my introductory and concluding chapters. Short version: Problem: I haven’t gotten meaningful feedback on the last 60% of my research work and it stresses me out! Put short, my thesis is three mini-projects, with the last 2 being spin-offs from the first that was actually published. I submitted the work for my 2nd project last September (as a thesis chapter) and the work for my 3rd project last February. My main feedback, concerned the number of citations, formatting of the paper and introduction. Is this normal? I ask for feedback all.the.time regarding my research and I just don’t get any. I have no clue if my analysis is sound, techniques are good, just nothing. We actually had a group meeting, two of is other students presented on their research about 10minutes (They do get regular meetings and feedback). When it was time for me to go, It didn’t go so well. He asked me to present on a paper I found a week earlier, so I started with that before my research. Well….it was a 25 minute tangent lead by my advisor on why the people in the paper are wrong. I didn’t get to present on my work because they all had to go. It was really frustrating. On top of that, I can’t even manage a meeting with my advisor at best, maybe once every two weeks, because he is “to busy” (but he wants me to be in my office all day Monday-Friday, it’s crazy). It really has me worried. Any advice? He also does not want me to confide (or ask advice) from any of the other faculty concerning what is going on. I remember once, I was talking with the faculty head in the hallway (my advisor was running late for one of our meetings). While we were talking, I spotted my advisor standing awkwardly nearby, before he interrupted our conversation (rather abruptly) and sent me to his office while they talked. What do I do!? I literally feel helpless at this point.
  5. Dear all, I've been offered admission by two universities (UCSD and UVa). I am currently weighing these two wonderful options, and I’m considering a lot of factors including prospective advisors and mentors, academic culture, university resources, graduate placement, funding, and location. I know that the most important of these is my future supervisor. Now, if all other things were equal, I'd be left with what seems to be a Manichaean dilemma. My recruiter/prospective supervisor at UCSD has been simply great. Besides the fact that my research seems to be perfectly aligned with their* work, the current students at UCSD with whom I've had the chance to talk have had nothing but superlative praise for this particular professor. My prospective supervisor already has plans for me--for example, they're already including me in a panel session that they're preparing for the AAAs in San Jose this year. That being said, the said professor is young and is a very new hire in the department. I believe this is their first job post-PhD, and I also think I might be the first PhD student they will supervise. I can't help but worry about the possibility that my prospective supervisor might eventually want to move to another university before I finish my PhD there. The work of the other professors in the department isn't as aligned with my research interests, although I'm sure one of them would be able to supervise me if I were to stay there. My prospective supervisor and I are going to have another Skype session soon. What should I ask? My situation at UVa is quite different. While I'm not aware of any specific professor at UVa who really wants to get me in the program, I think there are more members in the faculty (than at UCSD) who can supervise me. One of them is a very famous scholar in the subfield of anthropology that I identify with, and I would definitely love to work with them. Current students there have told me that this professor seems like a likely supervisor for me. However, I know that because they are older and more popular, they are definitely busier and in greater demand. I am afraid that I might not get as much attention and support from them because of this and that this would somehow hurt not only my PhD but also my professional career. What do you think? Both universities and both professors are really, really great, and I am having such a difficult time deciding. I would greatly appreciate your thoughts! If anyone is interested in specific details, I would be happy to provide them in a PM. If you know anything specific about these two departments, please PM me, too! Looking forward to hearing from you! * I'm using the gender-neutral singular pronouns they and them.
  6. Hi everyone, I am trying to minimize the chance of ending up with a bad advisor. I am applying to colleges in England - Oxford, Cambridge, UCL, Imperial College, Kings College, etc - for a PhD program in Computer Science. I have heard UCL allows one to change the advisor after getting admits with funding from CS department. Do you which other departments in England (they can even be different from the one I mentioned) allow you to change your advisor? Thanks! Gan
  7. Hello! I am looking to apply to PhD programs in Religion or History, but preferably religion if the university offers a religion program. I am trying to find potential supervisors for a Phd focusing on the English Reformation. My research broadly focuses on the English Reformation and the intermixing between the role of the state and populace in the matters of religion. I also do a lot with the Book of Common Prayer and the transformation of liturgy. Unless an extraordinary circumstance happens, PhDs outside of the US offer very limited and very hard to obtain funding. So for that reason I am trying to stay within the US. The professors and universities i have at the moment are: Peter Lake - Vanderbilt J Patrick Hornbeck - Fordham Ethan Shagan - UC Berkeley People I am unsure about due to vague biographies on the university website. Linda Pollock - Tulane. Focuses on religion but a greater emphasis on family. Lee Palmer Windel - Wisconsin- Madison Euan Cameron - Columbia Thank you for your help and suggestions!
  8. Sarah :)

    Emailing Potential Advisor

    Hey all I am drafting email to send to my potential advisor . What to include ? what not to include ? I know I should read their previous papers , how many of their papers should I read ? I heard it was like 12 -20 papers , is it true ? I feel like it is a lot of work (considering the fact that I will be emailing about 10 professors so 20*10 = 200 papers that's almost a masters thesis ) one more thing, how many advisors should I email? 10 ? 20 ? Any tips is appreciated
  9. Sebastian24

    EAPSI 2017

    For any current or former EAPSI applicants, how did you word the initial contact with prospective host researchers? I can't decide which of the following options is more appropriate and likely to be well-received: "I propose to research XYZ using methods XYZ. Would you be willing to host me and fund the proposed research?" "My general interests are XYZ. Do you have any ongoing projects in this research area that I could participate in during summer 2017?" I feel like Option 2 is more polite, but Option 1 conveys a "go-getter" perspective that could be desirable in certain circumstances. Unfortunately, my field of study/research methodology (field-based environmental science) requires costly equipment and support personnel that would not be covered by EAPSI funding, so asking the host to provide these (boldface in Option 1) is an elephant in the room that cannot be ignored. Does anyone have an opinion and/or insight into how you handled this when you were applying? Thanks in advance!
  10. Does anybody have a dissertation proposal story to share? Anything related to deadlines that got missed because no one told you what the deadline was, communicating with multiple faculty, some who rarely respond to emails, departments that don't communicate the rules but expect them to be followed, etc. Also, advice on how to deal with difficulties like these tactfully without sounding snarky or blame-y (sometimes I feel like writing, "I sent you an email about this two weeks ago") would be great! Most of the faculty are great, but I am just not catching on to the styles of others. Thanks!
  11. leftover cheese

    Discouraged

    I'm nearing my last semester of my two year Master's program (anthropology) and I feel like I've barely learned enough to scape by in my field, never mind apply to PhD programs. Unfortunately(/fortunately) I know I am not alone in this feeling, as two other students in my cohort feel the same way and share many of the same frustrations. My advisor is very respected and connected in my field and is available for occasional meetings, however, he offers very, very little direction or concrete guidance, and has actually said to another MA student regarding their thesis to "just get it done," strongly implying to that person not to worry too much about how good it is. This advisor is retiring soon and it is painfully obvious that he has already checked out on the MA students, while most of his PhD students are already 4-5 years into their programs and know what they are doing. I know this from talking to others in the lab and the department. I also have heard from multiple people that this advisor does not actually READ term papers and have been plainly told that it doesn't matter what we write in them because "you'll just get an A." I am happy about getting As, but I'm concerned about the almost total lack of critical feedback that I've come to learn is the department norm. Aside from gripes about the program, my main issue right now is coming up with and executing a worthwhile thesis project with little-to-no guidance for someone who pretty plainly has stated that he just wants it done while I already feel under-confident in my abilities as a student. I really respect my advisor (and hope I've managed to maintain enough anonymity here) and I understand that he has many obligations, but I feel lost and I have pretty much given up on expecting any more guidance. I have been reading as many articles and MA theses as I can in my proposed research area and beyond and I am learning a lot, but I'm struggling with how I can apply what I learn to come up with and do a project on my own. I don't know how to gauge what scope is appropriate, what the limits and possibilities are for resources within and outside the lab, or how to design a project and a thesis proposal. While I don't currently have the confidence that I can come up with something potentially publishable, I really want to produce something that I will at least be comfortable showing my peers or possibly using down the line if I want to apply to PhD programs. I should mention that I'm beyond the point where switching focus or advisors is a possibility and I actually think my advisor is the best option in our department anyway. I feel dissatisfied with my MA experience as a whole and desperately want more training and education, but I also don't feel like I am at all prepared for a PhD program right now and I know my feelings of inadequacy are holding me back. Once I get past the thesis and graduating I intend to continue studying and getting practical experience outside of a formal program, but right now that seems so out of reach. I'm realizing how much I'm going to need to learn and teach myself and it feels daunting. I appreciate any advice or accounts of similar experiences.
  12. Hello Everyone, This is a follow up/ part 2 to an earlier question that I have posted: http://forum.thegradcafe.com/topic/85886-advice-on-contacting-potential-phd-advisors/#comment-1058425898 If you want to read it for some context that may help you answer my questions but I'll give you the brief summary. I have applied to a PhD program at Georgia State. After already applying one of the professors in the program replied to an email and told me that next time I should try and contact a professor in the program for potential advisement. So I actually winded up meeting with that professor right before thanksgiving and we discussed why I wanted to be in the program and just the program in general. I asked whether or not there was potential for him to advise me for my PhD. He told me something along the lines of "There is potential but funding may be an issue" which he proceeded to tell me about other opportunities such as teaching assistantships. Then he took me around to show me the labs, introduced me to some other professors and talked about some of the work he did. So in the first meeting I really didn't get the hard "Yes" answer I was looking for as far as him being my advisor is concerned. It seemed like more of a "maybe so." After a little I have now been able to set up a second meeting with him next week. I suppose this is a good sign but what things should I be asking him in particular? Also what would be the best way to ask if he would approve my application and be my advisor? Any advise would really help. Thank you
  13. Hi everyone I started my masters and my advisor is a young assistant professor. When I contacted her to before application, she said that she had a project while when I came here (another country), she said that we have to find a topic. The problem is she is new to the field and does not help me at all. She expects me to go and find a topic myself. I tried to have meetings at first regularly, but after a couple of meeting that I noticed she does not give a me helpful feedback I stopped. It has been a more than a month now that I havent talked to her. Today I prepared a table of previous studies and wanted her to take a look at it and then we can have a meeting next day, yet she refused to read it and told me to find a hypothesis and write about it and show her the results. Guys, I am not sure that if I am a lazy student, or she really does not do her job as an advisor... Please help me to figure this out.
  14. I'm in my third year of my PhD in English working on my oral lists right now. Unfortunately, my advisor and I are not getting along. She doesn't think my work is up to par, and made it clear that if I don't "learn how to write better" that she worries I will not be ready to move on to the dissertation stage (I have taken this to mean that she thinks I should drop out if I can't prove I'm good enough). She told me this in June. This semester I've been working on a paper to prove to her that I belong here. I'm in a publication workshop led by our department chair, and we've been workshopping this paper all semester. I expressed my concerns about my advisor and my writing to the department chair, and she reassured me that she thinks my writing is on track and that it is PhD level work. Today I met with my advisor after she finally read a full draft of my paper. She hated the paper. She doesn't think that it's where it needs to be. It's hard to tell all the details without talking about the paper, but she basically thinks that it needs a lot of work. And, that's okay with me. I'm okay with getting criticism. What I'm not okay with is the way in which she delivers it--she treats me like I'm dumb. It's almost as if I'm offending her with my bad writing. During our conversation she asked me why I was in grad school and I gave several reasons. She followed up by saying that I should reconsider being in grad school, especially with the job market. She also told me that perhaps her and I are just not on the same page and that perhaps I would work better with someone else. I'm smart enough to know that being told that I should consider dropping out and having an advisor suggest different committee members is pretty much the worse news someone can get in grad school. Clearly I'm doing something wrong. I'm willing to face that. What keeps me going is that other professors like my work. The only issue is that they're not in my direct field of study so I would have to change my focus. I'm willing at this point to do that because I want to finish the degree. I'm sending the same paper I gave to my advisor to two other people to see what they think, and that will largely be my determining factor for staying. At any rate, I guess I'm just curious if this is common--could it just be that my advisor has a different standard and we're just not seeing eye to eye? Or should I drop out like she says? At this point obviously I can't work with this advisor anymore. It's sad because I have to shift my area of study. Oh well. I don't want to be naive or defiant. I don't want to go against my advisor simply because I am invested and am emotional...I just need to get advice from someone outside of my department. Any help would be appreciated.
  15. So I made an error in my email to a potential advisor when expressing my interest in her lab. I bymistake wrote the wrong lab name. This was 7 days back, and she hasn't replied. Will this affect my chances of admission? Is there anyway I can rectify this?
  16. I'm currently in my second year PhD at Stanford. My advisor took a position at UCLA (and with that, an endowed professorship as well). I am a bit torn as to whether I should leave and follow him to UCLA, which would require me transferring out of my program and my PhD would come from UCLA. The benefit I see from this would be an increase in money to spend on research, and a chance to build a lab from ground zero and really be a driving factor in the direction of the lab. Plus, he's a great advisor. My other option is to remain at Stanford, pick a new advisor and move in a new direction. Benefits to staying at Stanford, well, I love the people I met here and am building a network of people (with the alumni as well) that can potentially help me post-grad. Wanted to field some thoughts from the community on what I should do. Willing to answer some questions as well if it helps with advice giving.
  17. My advisor assigned me a project using a statistical method I don't think he fully understood. It's new, one he hasn't used before, and it is in a dense, poorly written article. I have expressed to him that I felt we didn't understand it well enough, that we should consider collaborating with others to make sure the method was tenable, and that I felt it might not work. However, he blew these concerns off. When the initial results looked promising, I let it go. A few months later, my latest results look weird as hell. I reread the article for hundredth time to see if we had missed something. I think I found it. I have good reason to believe that our data violate a key assumption of the method (not described by the authors!) and that our results are complete garbage. The problem is that I am signed up to present these results as a poster in a few months time at a conference to which I have already been accepted and funded to attend. I don't know how I can back out with my plane and hotel already bought by the department. What do I do? Keep mum? It's wrong and I'm worried someone will find me out anyway. I have emailed my advisor, but he is on vacation and hasn't responded yet. Please proceed from the assumption that I am correct. I don't need to troubelshoot a scenario where everything is A OK. I need to troubleshoot the potentially terrible mistake I have made. Even though everyone in the field knows that beginning students don't design these projects, my head is on the chopping block; I am ultimately responsible for the research I put my name on. Knowing what I know now, I won't let it get to the publishing phase before the issues I identified are resolved, but what do I do about the conference?
  18. so I've received the offer from one of my dream department (not from grad school yet.) My advisor suggested me to attend the weekly lab meeting, and some other labmates started to ask me questions about their work. (since I've done similar things before) My biggest issue is that I feel a lot of pressure: if I don't meet their expectations about my ability to do things reflected in my application, will my offer be influenced? Also I feel it's too early for them to involve me in the lab. (still half a year away! And I have to do my own heavy coursework too.) They also asked me if I received the offer yet. I haven't because it's only March. Any suggestions about these?
  19. I got an offer for a summer internship in industry but I'm afraid my PI won't let me do it. My PI has never been supportive of the internship idea since my 1st year (I'm in my 4th year), no matter how well I perform, and how hard I try to convince him. Last year, he told another company that made me a summer internship offer that I couldn't do it because of my scholarship, which is false. The truth was that I was the only person in the lab and he needed someone to do research. According to my committee I can graduate any time of Fall 2016 depending on how fast I can find a job and write my thesis. This year I asked him if I could apply to another internship (I didn't tell him I applied) and he said no, and that an internship could delay my graduation. So, I'm pretty sure that if I tell him that I have an offer for this internship he will get upset and say no, even if I offer to delay my graduation. Although I have more than enough to put on my thesis (many publications too) he wants me to keep doing research just to get publications for him. Our lab has very little grant money and only a 1st year student works in the lab besides me. But I have a scholarship that pays for my tuition, half of my health insurance, and about 60% of my monthly stipend. So he only pays a little bit compared with what he has to pay to other students/postdocs. He rarely goes to the lab, and during the summer he tends to disappear for 1-2 months for vacation. Last year I talked with the graduate program director about this internship issue with my PI (and many other issues). He was supportive with other issues, but not with the internship idea.The graduate program director also thinks that an internship is a waste of time, so I know I can't get support from him. The graduate program director told me that I should do a postdoc instead, after graduating, and that a postdoc would be my "internship". What should I do? Should I do the internship without telling him? and hope he won't find out? Or should I tell him? Does anyone have experiences with this type of controlling PI? Thanks in advance!
  20. Hello, I have applied to the Mechanical Engineering Masters program for Fall 16 at University of Wisconsin Madison. After applying I noticed that I had to secure an advisor, So I emailed 3 POIs (whom I've named in my SOP) that I am interested in their work, neither of them replied but my advisor requirement got checked off (though I don't know who my advisor is). Is that a good thing? does it mean a good chance of getting admitted? Also I did not see an option in the application form to upload my CV or resume, so naturally I did not submit it but my status shows that they have all the materials they need to make a decision. How can they judge a profile without a resume? How am I supposed to let them know about my projects, papers or work experience (kinda the backbone of my application)? Wisconsin Application process for Mechanical Engineering is pretty WEIRDDD!!
  21. I was just wondering if it would be too forward to get in contact with a POI regarding my application status if I was in contact with them before submitting my application? I don't want to be an annoyance but she did say "feel free to email me with any follow-up questions" and that she looked forward to seeing my application. What do you guys think? Thanks!
  22. Hi, I have a different type of question I can't quite seem to find the answer for... In my major, you typically need a professor to take you into their lab before even applying to the school. I have done all this, emailing professors and finding ones with interest in me. I have completed all of my application requirements at this point and it has been a month since I submitted and talked with these professors. I feel like I should send them a friendly follow up email to let them know I am still interested and thinking about their program and project, and to keep my name fresh in their mind (In the decision process for them wanting me in their lab). Is this a good idea? How would I write this email without sounding cheesy? Any ideas would be much appreciated!! Thanks!
  23. Dear all, thanks for reading. To clarify - I have not switched advsiors - but I have thought about it before. I spent my last tow years getting my MS, in a advisor-advisee relationship that was far from ideal. My advisor (OA) was almost to retire, had a big name but only a post doc, me and two other MS students. Once he did not answer my emails for 60 days. Fortunately I was externally funded. I seriously considered switching advisors, or maybe even departments after the first year, but program director and other professors (let s call him OP) talked me into staying. In retroperspective I do not think they should have, this is now time I could have already invested into my PhD studies. During my MS degree I applied for grad school again, all in all very stressy when writing a thesis. I never really had the time to speak to all prospective advisors in a depth I really wanted too. Also I am international, that certainly adds to the pressure. I agreed to work with my new advisor (NA), who is a little bit outside my field but still in reach research wise, after he agreed on me being coadviced by professor OP I wanted to work with, too. I am working projects for both, but my new advisor wants me to do things far from my focus, absolutely outside my field of interest and expertise. He knows my background and knows that I love to look at the fundamental physics of a problem but wants me to be really transitional/application based - in an extend that fundamental are not covered at all anymore. I really wonder why he picked me and his other students tell me the horror stories (he likes to micro manage). Now I am sitting here, unable to focus on my work, because it is for sure not the thing I want to do the next 4 years and ever after. Have you ever been in a similar situation, and how did you get out. It seems as I too picky or bad in choosing my advisors (even though I had not much say in the choice of my first OA). Any good ways to get out without too big waves?
  24. Hello, everyone... I really appreciate this forum. This may be more appropriate for the writing forum, but here it goes... I am a third year student in a PhD program at a large research university in the U.S. I have two Master's degrees in related fields, so I feel like I have some experience in academia (at least compared to other students in my cohort). Until now, I've felt like my writing was decent - not perfect, but not terrible. However, since I started working on my PhD with my current advisor, I've noticed that I've had trouble organizing my papers (particularly manuscripts for publication - not so much for class papers; I get good grades). I'm thinking this may be due in part to my advisor. She is NOT well-liked by anyone in the department, or any of her graduate students, for a wide variety of reasons. However, I'm unable to figure out exactly what the problem is (other than the fact that it seems I'm not one of her favorite students). I've maintained a good relationship with my old advisor (with whom I did one of my Master's degrees), and we continue to work together on a number of projects (papers). She doesn't see anything wrong with my work. I've gotten some useful feedback from my lab-mates (we all get along pretty well... just not with our advisor), but the feedback I get from my advisor often seems vague and unhelpful. Other students in our lab don't seem to have this specific problem to the same degree. So I guess I'm just asking if anyone else has had similar experiences and might have some advice. I'm kind of out of ideas. I just feel like the longer I work with my current advisor, the worse my writing (and, as a result, publishing record) gets. Any thoughts would be much appreciated. Hopefully I'll be able to repay the favor at some point. Thanks! - JG
  25. Hi All, Last year, I completed an undergraduate thesis. My advisor loved my thesis, and wanted to help publish the work. At the beginning of the summer, I sent my advisor an edited draft. Unfortunately, he was away at a conference. However, he explained he would review the draft once he had time, and that I should send a second draft if I did not hear back in a week. Well...I sent a second draft, but now it has been two months. Should I send another draft to my professor? Or, ask him if he has reviewed the other draft? I am currently enrolled in a masters' program, but I would like to go on for a PhD. I think having this work published would be great for my resume. After reading this over, I realize I should ask my professor if he has read my draft, but just in case...any other suggestions on how to resolve this?
×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.