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Found 5 results

  1. I'm applying to at least two, potentially more Clinical Psychology programs through PSYCAS. Does anyone know if, when I request my references through PSYCAS, they will have to submit one letter that will be then sent to each program, or if they will have to submit a letter per each school applied to? Asking because it will potentially impact how many schools I apply to. I don't particularly want to burden my references with having to go through 15 different reference letter links through PSYCAS if I decide to be ambitious and apply to that many - but if they only need to submit one, then it's just more work for me and not them.
  2. Hello, everyone! Given the strange concern some of us have for getting a job after completing our PhD programs, I decided to undertake a friendly/nerdy investigation. Perhaps this has been done before; at any rate, I found it enlightening. Maybe it will help you too, as we reach the final stage of our decision making. How strongly do Leiter's current (2018) Philosophical Gourmet Report (PGR) rankings correlate with job placement into permanent academic positions? Rather weakly, it turns out. I contrasted the PGR data on a spreadsheet with placement data from 2017 research funded by the APA from the years 2012-2016 with some interesting results. (See below for a link to the data.) Before I report my findings, I should note a few caveats: The APA placement data reports the most recent placement status of a given graduate within the time period, so some of those in permanent academic positions are surely second- or third-year hires, given the substantial number of PhD-earners who don't get placed for a year or two. Leiter has criticized the APA-funded data for leaving out postdocs (who may have postponed a viable permanent academic position). This is good to keep in mind; however, a number of the postdocs would have applied for positions within the 2012-2016 period, which at least ameliorates the problem. I use the terms “weak” and “strong” for correlations in an intuitive rather than a technical sense. Numbers can be presented in very biased ways, especially when statistical or categorical lines in the sand are drawn. I do draw such lines, so take my categories with a grain of salt. I left out altogether universities outside the United States. Also, when a university was distinguished from its HPS (history and philosophy of science) program, I reported whichever of the two had a higher placement rate and left the other out altogether. So, for example, when calculating the PGR representation of the top 50 schools for permanent academic placement, I divided the 29 PGR-represented schools by the 45 of the top 50 which don't fall under either of these two exclusions. There are, of course, other factors to consider besides employment: publishability, raw academic opportunity (and correlation with personal interests), oddball placement factors (school X never hires from school Y), teaching/research balance, etc. This investigation is limited, but within those limits it is insightful. Without further ado, here are some of my findings about the top 63 permanent-academic-placement (PAP) schools vis-a-vis the PGR top 50. 20 of the top 63 PAP programs are PGR-unranked. These include the following: Cincinnati , Baylor, Florida, Oregon, Tennessee, Villanova, Penn St., DePaul, Catholic University of America, Vanderbilt, New Mexico, Emory, Miami, Washington, Fordham, Stony Brook, Duquesne, Georgia, USF, and Iowa. Given the top X schools for PAP, where X is a multiple of 10 between 1 and 6, PGR never includes more than 67.3% of them. Representation always declines as we approach the top of the PAP list (except moving from top 50 to top 40, but the difference is a negligible 0.4%). By the time we reach the PAP top 10, PGR only predicts half of them. There are 11 PGR-unranked schools that have PAP rates of 50% or better. (On the above list, these consist of everything from Cincinnati to New Mexico). This rate is better than that of half (25) of PGR-ranked schools. 10 PGR-ranked schools, ranging from PGR-rank 9 to 40, placed too low even to be considered by the APA study, which bottomed out at 38% PAP. These programs include UCLA, CUNY, Brown, and Duke. Only 1 of the 8 PGR “bubble” schools (Nebraska) was in the APA top 63. Important: It is true that PGR rankings do correlate more strongly with PAP into PhD-granting programs. Of the 20 high-PAP schools that are PGR-unranked, only 3 place students into PhD-granting programs at a rate of 10% or higher. By contrast, half of the PGR top 50, including the entire top 20 (minus some of the PGR-ranked schools which placed too low overall for APA consideration), place students into PhD-granting programs. Here's the link to the APA-funded study. The portion relevant to my post begins on page 43: https://www.dropbox.com/s/61qgeway2nyhr7x/APDA2017FinalReport.pdf?dl=0 Bottom line: If you're cool with teaching undergrads, PGR isn't going to be very helpful. If you strongly prefer teaching graduate courses, PGR is going to be very helpful; however, at that point you might as well just look at the APA rankings for PAP placement into PhD-granting programs. Hope this can help someone.
  3. Hello, all! I'm still in the process of editing my writing sample, but the issue I'm trying to figure out is the writing style. The most recent paper I have is from an interdisciplinary foundations graduate course, but the professor required us to use APA. Should I keep it that way if I'm applying to a Classical Studies MA program? I've been trying to figure out if I should make it Chicago before putting it in with my application; the biggest issue I'm concerned about is that the writing sample is what the university uses to judge whether to offer the student funding or not. So, I want to make sure the formatting is done well in addition to the paper being written well. Since it also deals with disabilities studies in my paper, I suppose the APA might be okay, but I'm nervous about it. Any suggestions?
  4. I am writing a paper for psychology and I need some help on APA guidelines, specifically on in-text citation. Suppose a certain book xxxxx has the following: "Perceptual learning, process by which the ability of sensory systems to respond to stimuli is improved through experience. Perceptual learning occurs through sensory interaction with the environment as well as through practice in performing specific sensory tasks. The changes that take place in sensory and perceptual systems as a result of perceptual learning occur at the levels of behaviour and physiology. Examples of perceptual learning include developing an ability to distinguish between different odours or musical pitches and an ability to discriminate between different shades of colours." Suppose I want to use the first two sentence. Which of the following two methods are the correct way of citing? Method (1): Perceptual learning, process by which the ability of sensory systems to respond to stimuli is improved through experience. Perceptual learning occurs through sensory interaction with the environment as well as through practice in performing specific sensory tasks (xxxxx, 2016). Method (2): Perceptual learning, process by which the ability of sensory systems to respond to stimuli is improved through experience (xxxxx, 2016). Perceptual learning occurs through sensory interaction with the environment as well as through practice in performing specific sensory tasks (xxxxx, 2016). I am taking two sentences, do I cite two times at the end of each sentence or do I cite one time at the end of the last sentence?
  5. Hey everyone! I just received an email (as I'm sure many of you have) and just wanted to share with people thinking about next years application season! It is a webinar, and three hours in length. Here is the description: Are you considering graduate study in psychology? If so, then you will be joining the ranks of thousands of other bright, talented and dedicated peers who will be competing for admissions into the top graduate programs in the field. Learn about what you can to maximize your chance of gaining admission into the graduate program of your choice. This fast-paced workshop covers: Exploring Your Options a. Master’s vs. Doctoral Programs: What’s Hot (and What’s Not) b. Sorting through the Alphabet Soup: Ph.D., Psy.D., Ed.D, M.A., M.S, MSW, LCSW (and more) Preparing for Graduate Study a. Inside the Classroom b. Outside the Classroom Applying to Graduate Schools a. Objective Components of the Graduate Application (Transcript, GPA, GRE, Vita) b. Subjective Components of the Graduate Application (Personal Statement, Letters of Recommendation) So, if anyone is interested the link to register is here: http://apa.bizvision.com/video/4324 The cost is $35, but if you enter PSICHI in the discount code section, it will be $25. Hope this helps someone out!
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