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Found 229 results

  1. Hi all! I've been scouring the forum here, and decided to get over my disinclination to participate in online activities as I'm in dire need of application-anxiety camaraderie. Non-American, from a non-English speaking country--this makes applications doubly crazy. My home university is good in relation to the region, but really a no-name internationally. My entire faculty have PhD's from top tier American/British uni's (Berkeley, Stanford, Oxford, etc), but since they rarely have students from our department apply to American grad schools, they are hard-pressed to really guide me through this insane process. But, before I list my reasons for being on the brink of blowing a fuse, my application materials: B.A. in Psych and English, GPA 94/100 (no 4 pt. scale here). M.A. in English (have finished required courses, but still writing the thesis), GPA 96/100. GRE: 167V/164Q/5W TOEFL (computer based): 117 I refuse to take the GRE Lit (money+time+unlikely to score well=not worth it). LoR: going to have very strong recommendations from my two advisors plus another professor who's been incredibly enthusiastic about what he considers my exemplary academic abilities. They've also all known me for a good few years, as I've been in the same department for both B.A. (3 years) and M.A. (2 years). Downside is, my advisors--one is an emeritus prof. and the other a young associate prof. Not the best, but there's nothing I can do about it. SoP: this is going ok, I guess, considering that however well-meaning they may be, the faculty members helping me have little insight into what the adcoms are looking for, or what the SoP should really be. I've done substantial research on this, but like nearly everyone else, I'm not very confident in what I'm doing. I have, though, given significant thought to the somewhat undefinable issue of "fit" and am applying only where there is some or significant research in my areas, and where there are at least two faculty members I'd be happyto work with. WS: this has, somewhat weirdly, become a slight problem. I plan to use one of my thesis chapters, but since none of them are completed or have been thoroughly revised, and because I'm currently suffering a mild bout of anxiety-induced writer's block, it's not shaping up as well as I hoped, and I'm not as far along as I planned to be. Need to buck up and get at it, I know, but this whole process has touched the very core of my insecurities. Extra fun stuff: Awards/Scholarships: 2 departmental awards in English Full funding for my MA (tuition+stipend) Faculty of Humanities and Soc-Sci Dean's Prize (given 1% of thesis-track MA students in the faculty) Scholarship for undertaking research in American Lit-Culture program abroad (in Germany, where I'll be spending three months) Research/Teaching: 3 years TA for undergrad English courses 2 years RA for English department 6 months RA for Psych department Conferences: 2 small, regional conferences Waiting for response to abstracts I sent to a graduate conf. in Europe, and a big int'l conf. in Europe Some of the problems: Since I'm not a US resident, I'm very hesitant to apply to State schools (although I will be applying to 2), as I gather they'll be less likely to accept me (it's not economical for them). Since I'm not taking the GRE Lit, this narrows down the list . I'm very wary of applying to schools that have only changed from "requiring" it to "highly recommending" it during this application season (e.g. Notre Dame and Rutgers). I'm also only applying to programs that offer full funding, with TAships etc. guaranteed. Though this is true in the U.S. as well, I feel like to be able to find a job back home after completing the PhD, I really need to go to a good, reputable school. Considering the life changes (moving across the world, uprooting my SO in the process, making it very difficult to start a family for 5-7 years, which is shitty, because if I get accepted, I'll start the program at 29, etc.) and the financial burden this whole process is incurring on my life, it also feels like the school/program needs to "justify" it. I've been working toward this goal since the second year of my undergrad, and I need to feel like if I take this leap toward a PhD in the States, I'm also giving myself the best chance for a future career in academia. I want to pursue a PhD in any case, just because I love what I do, but if I do it for fun then I'll stay at home to do so. So, bottom-line, I'm only applying to places in the U.S. that I think will increase my chances jump-starting an academic career. I'm terrified that adcoms will glimpse at my application, see that my school is completely unknown to them, and put my file aside. Especially coming from a non-English speaking country into an English dept... So, these are the schools I'm applying to: Columbia, UPenn, Brown, UT Austin, Emory, NYU, U of Virginia, Rice, George Washington. On the "maybe" pile I have Rutgers, Duke, CUNY, and Chicago--which I cut down for various, and sometimes arbitrary reasons. I'm also applying to AmStudies at Yale (although I am a little nervous that, since my research focus would still be lit, they'll immediately chuck my app and wonder why I didn't apply to English). Broadly, my interests are queer theory, feminism, gender and sexuality, disability, and race--all in terms of how bodies are formed and represented; 20th/21st American/Brit women's writing, with a particular penchant for modernism (Woolf, Djuna Barnes, Gertrude Stein, Radclyffe Hall, etc.) Any recommendations for good programs with a decent focus in these areas that I may have overlooked? This has all been very lengthy, but it feels good to organize my thoughts. Does anyone have any advice? Is there anyone out there in a similar situation? And good luck to everyone else who's applying! May the odds be ever in our favor (I do feel slightly too old for this reference, I have to say, but I couldn't help myself).
  2. jenniferkp

    MPH Canada 2018

    Hello Friends, As this academic year is coming to a close, and MPH applications will be opening in just 6ish (months depending on where you're applying to of course!), I thought a thread for us to discuss, share our thoughts, feelings, fears, and the trials and tribulations of MPH applications would be helpful. I also find it helpful to know who's applying where I'm excited to start this journey and I'm hoping we all see acceptance letters/emails in under a year! Schools/programs I plan to apply to: UBC MPH UBC MSc in PPH (still need to start looking for a supervisor, how soon is too soon?) SFU MPH
  3. letsseewhathappens

    Political Science or Sociology?

    Hi there! Apologies if this thread has been created elsewhere before as this is my first post and I can't find anything similar. My undergrad and master's degrees were both interdisciplinary (International Studies degrees) and I am now gearing up to apply to programs in a few months. I am having a hard time whether to apply to Sociology programs only, Political Science programs only, or both. And if I do apply to both, I assume it would weaken my application to apply to both programs in a single institution/university. Has anyone had experience with this? I would love to hear your thoughts! Thank you!
  4. Hi, I am a Senior Year undergrad studying B. Engg in Information Technology. I am planning to do Masters by thesis in Computer Science from a good university in the USA, preferably FALL 2019. I have given the GRE and my scores are Q - 161 , V - 152 and AWA - 3.5. My CGPA is currently 7.47/ 10.0 (uptill 6th semester) and my SGPAs' from first sem to sixth sem are 8.33, 8.08, 6.92, 7.23, 7.16, 7.19 on a scale of 10.0. Also, my grades in key subjects like Operating Systems, Computer Networks, Probability and Random process, Discrete Mathematics, Compiler Construction, Theory of Automata are usually either C or D and occasionally B. What are my chances of getting into some of the decent colleges for MS in CS like Stony Brook, Rutgers NB, UMASS Amherst, University of Maryland, Texas A&M Collegestation etc ? Would I be able to get into a respectable grad program in any public research university with good placements and engaging programs? TLDR: My CGPA - 7.47/10.0 and SGPA dropped from 8.33 to a low of 6.92 due to poor health and stabilised around 7.2 by end of 6th sem. Poor grades in important subjects. Chances of getting into colleges like UMASS Amherst, Ohio State University, Rutgers NB, Stony Brook etc. PS: Giving my TOEFL on sep 15 and Thanks in Advance!
  5. Hi everyone! I'm currently in my third year at university studying economics and possibly adding a computational data science minor! Although right now I'm torn between working straight out of school or going into a graduate program, I'm definitely looking to apply next year. My main question is with my GPA and academic performance, what tier schools should I be looking at? When researching programs, the only real statistic I see is a minimum 3.0/4 to apply, but not a lot of programs give insights as to the scores of their incoming class. Additionally, I'm not really sure what constitutes a "good GPA" in an undergrad economics program. I currently have a 3.43 cumulative (3.33 within my major) HOWEVER, I started out as a nursing major and basically failed out my first semester of college and ended up transferring schools 3 times because of financial issues resulting in my 1.6 GPA my first semester (long story short I found out I lost my scholarship 2 weeks before school started my sophomore year, couldn't afford out of state tuition, transferred last minute to a safety school I was accepted to in HS that allowed me to apply last minute, then transferred AGAIN into my junior year into an actually solid economics department at another school because I was unhappy with the academics of the school I had to transfer into last minute). Basically, my applications are gonna make me look like a crazy person for transferring, and that 1.6 my first semester drops my cum GPA down to a 3.01 (not counting that first sem I have a 3.43 as an econ major ever since). My major GPA is a 3.4 which I ~think~ is OK for econ, I've gotten all As in math and nothing lower than B in my ECON classes. Based on that though, I'm not sure what would be a target school for my GPA. I have yet to take the GRE but my professional experiences I think highlight my strengths well as I have had great internships in the finance and tech world which I am hoping can offset the fact I "failed out almost" my first semester freshman year (lol). Is there a range of schools that anyone suggests I should look into? Specifically masters programs in applied economics? Ex. I would LOVE to get into George Washington but I doubt my grades are good enough, should I be targeting schools like George Mason, U of MD, etc? I know this post is super long so I apologize!!
  6. Like many others have done, I'm a current first year grad student! Feel free to ask any questions from applying to grad school itself! We're all in this together and I remember how rough the application process was!
  7. Hi everyone! For those who requested recommendations from employers, did you email them documents such as your transcript or a copy of your statement of purpose for them to review while writing the recommendations on your behalf? I'm applying to several programs via CSDCAS. I asked my supervisor and a special education teacher I worked with to write me letters. Do they need supplement items in order to write me a stronger recommendation? Or would it be better if I just submit the request form to them without those items? I would love feedback about this. Thank you
  8. leecy77

    Realistic Grad Schools

    So I'm in the process of picking graduate schools to apply to and Im having a hard time of getting past the mentality of applying for the best schools in my field and seeing what happens? (Yale BBS, NYU, Northwestern, Princeton, Brown-basically all the reaches). I can stay a second year in my current postbacc fellowship and have been advised to do so if i want a shot at these schools, but as i have fee waivers and the worst they can say is no, my head is stuck on aiming high and just taking feedback this round. Wondering what some match schools would be though! Also, unsure if id have a somewhat better shot applying to biology umbrella programs for neuroscience or straight into neuroscience? Undergrad Institution: Big stateMajor(s): NeuroscienceOverall GPA: 3.3, in major probably around 3.05 (pretty average student except for chem/ochem-mostly B's, pretty much few equal in science A's-C's cancelled out)Type of Student: (Domestic/International, male/female, minority?): Domestic, female, Puerto Rican & African AmericanGRE Scores:Q: 156/61%V: 159/83%W: 4.5/82% Other: Several extensive research experiences, (3 academic years, 2 summer fellowships, presented posters at 2 university conferences and won awards, ABRCMS national conference poster award, 2 travel awards, 1 middle author publication in submission, writing a review paper with a well known PI now), 3 pretty good LORs, and the typical grad cv full of extracurriculars I held 2 jobs most of my 3 years of undergrad, and graduated in 3 years rather than taking the 4th to improve my gpa due to financial considerations. Im currently in an NIH funded postbacc at Mayo Clinic. Bless you for reading this far, any and all advice is greatly appreciated!
  9. HI everyone, I sent one of my professors a copy of my letter of intent. She emailed me back and told me to include all of my experienced summarized in it. I used an approach where I picked some of my experiences from undergrad (student leadership, volunteering) and working as an aide in a special education day class. I wrote about those experiences, what I learned, and how it would help me succeed in graduate school and as an SLP. I did this because I've read to not summarize your resume in a letter. I'm sort of confused now. My resume/all of my experience is roughly 3 pages long by the way. I can send my letter of intent in a private message if anyone wants to and give me some feedback. Thank you
  10. Hi there, I'm starting the process of applying to grad schools for the Fall 2019 semester. Looking at all DC metro area based schools for IR/ Foreign Policy/ Security related programs. Ideally would be going to American or GW. Wondering how much a few things factor into your application when applying. I'm applying directly out of undergrad decent enough grades (3.3), I haven't taken the GRE yet, I have stunning recommendations, and Teaching assistant (in a related course) experience. The one thing I'm hoping will really set my application apart from other direct from undergrad applicants is my internship experience- I've held 5 political internships during my under-grad career (Will be 7 by the time I graduate). 3 of my internships are direct foreign policy/ IR experience (think tanks & DOD), 3 are in Congress, and one is directly political. Question for those further along in the admissions process- how much good does my experience actually do for my application? Thanks in advance.
  11. What better place to find people to share application anxiety with? I haven't seen another thread like this yet so here we go. Which programs are you applying to? Where are you from? What are your biggest concerns about applications? I'll start. I'm applying to a grand total of two schools (I'm obviously crazy) because I want to be on campus and I have to stay in VA. I'm looking at JMU and Longwood and honestly don't know what my chances are but I'm going to try to be optimistic. Figured I'd start applications early on CSDCAS but maaaan this process is waaay slower than I had anticipated! I'm so excited for grad school though!
  12. Someone made a similar thread last year just to have a separate thread for neuroscience PhD applications for the 2018 cohort. Hopefully it'll help reduce a little bit of the interview/decisions anxiety if we're all in the same boat!
  13. BeckieMSWFall2018

    CSUF MSW Fall 2018

    Hello Everyone, I wanted to create a place for people to collectively panic about admissions. Compare stats and say if you were admitted or not. So have at it!
  14. Undergrad Institution: Top 5 Undergrad Institution, Top 5 for Statistics - USNWR Major: Statistics GPA: 3.1/4.0 cumulative, 2.97/4.0 major (No excuses, I wish I had worked harder. The students here are very smart and talented) Type of Student: Domestic Asian Male Undergrad Courses: Calculus I-II-III (B, A-, B+), Introduction to Computer Science I-II (C+, B-), Computer Systems (B-), Regression (B+), Probability (B), Time Series Data (B+), Statistical Theory I-II (B, C+), Linear Algebra (B-), Discrete Math (B), Algorithms (B) Graduate Courses: Machine Learning (B+) GRE: Q: 170V: 163 W: 4 Mathematics GRE: N/A Programs Applying: Statistics MS Research Experience: Spent both summers as a Research Assistant. Built a large scale data visualization application first summer in a CS institute. Working at a Data Science Institute for this summer. Both are a part of my university. Recommendation Letter: Two with senior researchers that I RA'd for; one from a well-known CS professor that I've taken two classes with. One from a Stat professor that I got along with and may do research with this summer. Coding Experience: R, Python, C/C++ Other experience: Software Engineering Intern for a large consulting company. Worked in their IT Department. Awards/Honors: N/A I have no clue which schools to aim for. Would love MS program recommendations.
  15. Hey y'all. As you can see from the title, I'm interested to see what you all think about my chances are for getting into top PhD programs around the country. This is my first post, and may very well be in the wrong category so please redirect me if so... Below is a LONG list of my credentials, please let me know your thoughts! (Top schools interested in include Stanford, UCSF, UC Berkeley, JHU, Harvard, UPenn) BIOGRAPHY-Junior at a small private university in Iowa-Earning BS in Biochemistry and BA in Biology-Would like to get into translational research eventually (intrigued by stem cells, gene editing, cancer)STATS- 4.00 cumulative GPA- Haven't taken GRE yetRESEARCH- Participated in a NSF-funded REU at the University of Oklahoma during the summer of 2017, where I conducted research on CRISPR- Participating in another summer research opportunity this upcoming summer at either Johns Hopkins (Project is focused on stem cell based applications for translational research- By the time I graduate I will have had two full years conducting research at my home university in the biochemistry department-One project working on enzyme engineering (junior year)-Other project involves analyzing nuclear hormone receptors (senior year, upcoming)-In the fall of 2018 (senior year) I will also conduct a semester worth of research in the biology department (project is TBD)- I have analyzed and published two genes to the NCBI-Work in the chemistry department where I supervise NMR use, as well as care take the instrument-Present 3 posters at home university (2 before hopeful application)-Present 2 posters at national conferences by the time of graduation (1 before hopeful application)-Presented poster at University of Oklahoma symposium and another at either JHU this upcoming summerEXTRACURRICULARS-3 years of serving on the university’s student government-Helped start two clubs on campus related to science, one received national accreditation by the American Society of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology-Volunteer as assistant football coach for my high school team- Tutor students for 3 years on campus by the time of graduation-Serve as an unpaid TA for 3 semesters (hold a class once a week and go over problems answer questions), for both organic chemistry I and II as well as geneticsSCHOLARSHIPS AND HONORS SOCIETIES-Many scholarships (although probably doesn’t matter too much at this point)-National honor society for the American Society of Biochemistry and Molecular BiologyVOLUNTEER-Assistant football coach-Judge many science fairs for elementary and middle schools-Looking for more opportunities currently
  16. Hi everyone, longtime lurker here. I've trawled through tons of posts but haven't found any on exactly my situation, so I'd really appreciate any advice you can offer. I'm aiming to apply for PhD programs in the upcoming cycle, and my math training/grades are a serious weak link in my application. Profile with the usual suspects: School: Large public R1, top 25 USNWR Subfield: Comparative GRE: 170 V, 160 Q (5.5 AW, though I'm told no one cares) GPA: 3.7ish overall and 3.85ish major, depending on how my final classes go Letters of rec: 1 truly excellent from a thesis advisor well-known in my subfield, 2 passable Research experience: 2 research projects (ethnographic independent study + thesis that used basic statistics), local conference presentations, think tank internships. No publications Teaching experience: If you count leadership in some student clubs I can spin as academic Foreign language: Professional proficiency in Spanish and Mandarin, both of which I've used in research Here's the problem: Math courses: Single and multivariable calc (all C's). 1 introductory statistics course (A+), if that helps. Would it be enough just to say that I'm working through Simon and Blume's "Mathematics for Economists" + Moore and Siegel's "A Mathematics Course for Political and Social Research?" I'd love to get into a Top 20 program or Georgetown/George Washington. How could I improve my chances? I have some ideas, though I'm not sure which to prioritize: - Should I try to wrangle my research projects into something publishable? - Should I lobby hard / get down on my knees before my letter writers? - Should I contact prospective advisors with a charm offensive? - Should I retake the GRE and aim for a 165+ score? (I think I know the answer lol.) - Should I take a calc/linear algebra course online from a CC? (This would be costly.) Last option: - Should I just expect not to suceed this round and plan to attend an MA program like MAPSS? Thanks a ton.
  17. So, following the trend of the comp lit & early modern threads, I figured I'd start a topic for the 2018 rhetoric & composition applicants. What are you interested in studying? Where did you apply? How are you handling waiting?
  18. · A few weeks ago, I was asked to talk to first-year M.A. students about the Ph.D. application process. I prepared a list of what I figure to be key elements, and I figure it might be useful to many on GC who are preparing to go down this path as well. I'm quite certain that some of these points are purely subjective and open to discussion / debate, but having gone through the process a couple of times now, these items ring true based on my experiences and observations. ---------------- Others have surely told you about the state of the industry, so I’m just going to assume that you already know the “there are no jobs” spiel. · Others have also surely told you about how relatively difficult it is to get into a Ph.D. program—I have yet to hear of a program that admits over 10% of applicants. o Because of this, if you are committed to applying to Ph.D. programs, I strongly recommend considering applying to at least ten. Even though merit is a critical part of determining who gets in, there is a very real element of “luck of the draw” which pure numbers will help to mitigate. · With that in mind, NOW is a good time to get started on your program research · Your first consideration when entering the process should be to determine what era you would like to study, and ideally a general sense of methodologies you want to employ. These elements will be reflected in the two most important components of your application: the Statement of Purpose (or SoP), and your Writing Sample (WS). · Some basics: o The SoP and WS should ideally work together o When thinking about potential areas of study, avoid proposing transatlantic or transhistorical concepts: admissions committees are still very much set up by period, and your application should be easily sorted into a field group (i.e. you’re clearly a Romanticist, or you’re clearly a 20th century Americanist). o GRE scores, GPA, and other elements are important, but remember that the things you can control the most at this stage are the WS and SoP. o Given the importance of these two documents, you will want to get as many eyes on them as possible as soon as possible. § My SoP and WS were read and commented on by at least five professors and several fellow students, and ultimately went through at least six rounds of revision each—several of them top-to-bottom revisions. · There are multiple factors to consider when looking at programs. Some of the most important include: o Are there multiple professors actively working in your chosen field § I personally used a “rule of three”—if a program had three professors with significant research overlap with my interests, I would consider it. § By “active” I mean that you should be able to find publication credits from within the past five years—they need to be in touch with current scholarship. o What level of financial support do they offer—not just the annual funding, but whether they fund in summer, and how many years of funding are guaranteed o What courses have they offered in the past? What courses are they offering in the fall? o What is the teaching load like, and how do they prepare you for that load? o So-called rankings matter to a certain extent, but remember that those rankings are almost completely arbitrary. USNews rankings are helpful as a list of all programs offering Ph.D.s in English…and a very, very general sense of the strong programs vs. the less strong. But FIT with your interests trumps all. § (E.g. the Strode program at U of A is highly regarded, even though U of A itself is somewhat less so) o Location and cost of living. A 20k stipend will get you a lot further in Lincoln, Nebraska than in New York. And elements like small town vs. large city, cold vs. warm climate etc. are all perfectly valid factors when looking at programs. You’ll have to live in this place for 4-6 years, after all! · A few quick and random tips: o It can be helpful to contact professors ahead of time to determine research fit etc., but it can also be quite valuable to contact current grad students to get a sense of the program and the environment. o Remember that an important part of professionalization in a Ph.D. program is publication. More than anything, this means that before you go down the road toward application, give some serious thought to whether or not your writing and research inclinations have that kind of potential. And whether or not that’s something you really want to deal with at all. o Also remember that teaching is a huge part of your job, and always will be. If you don’t enjoy teaching (or the prospect of teaching), you’d better really love the other components of your position, because there’s not going to be any getting away from it for many, many years. o It might go without saying, but be very courteous in all of your communications with professors and other graduate students. And that courtesy should be sincere! o Consider the total cost of applications: application fees average about $75, sending GRE scores is $27 (more if you need the subject test), and if you have multiple transcripts, that can tack on another $10. In other words, each application will likely be upward of $100. Given that I recommend applying to at least ten programs, you’re looking at a commitment of over $1000. There ARE fee waivers you can find, however. o Forums like GradCafe are a good way to socialize with fellow applicants, and commiserate with people in the same situation. Just remember to take all advice you see on those forums with a grain of salt. o Finally, there are NO SAFETY SCHOOLS. Just to reiterate, rankings are arbitrary, and almost every program gets ten times as many applicants as they can admit (let alone fund). As a result, you want to look at the best overall fit for you.
  19. Hi! I am applying to the master's for general psychology at CUNY's Hunter and City College, but I am confused about the difference between the two programs? I've seen Hunter College mentioned often in my search, but City College seemed more obscure. As someone with little insider knowledge, it's hard for me to understand if there's a big difference in reputation, types of research, quality of education, admission rate, etc. I ultimately want to do a PsyD or PhD in clinical psychology, but I didn't didn't take any psychology courses in undergrad. Any advice would be appreciated! NOTE: above message is posted by a friend using my account!!!!!
  20. kpietromica

    Geography 2018 Applications Thread

    For those applying for Fall 2018 admittance in geography programs.
  21. phdthoughts

    2018 Applications Thread

    Hi everyone. I haven't seen an applications thread for this coming cycle just yet, so I thought I'd start one. My interests are health/environmental and social interaction and culture. I applied to four schools last year and was waitlisted by Purdue and Amherst so I'm trying again with those schools and a few others. 2018 applicants, where are you all in the process and how are you feeling about this cycle?
  22. I left my first PhD program after two years and after that took up a teaching job for two years and now I am planning to apply for the PhD on the same topic again. In my first PhD i was not a failure , I took all advanced level courses and got decent grades. However my advisor who is a nice person otherwise works very fast and wants immediate results while since it is theoretical physics I was in general overwhelmed by the sheer amount of things I did not know and needed some time to adjust while the advisor just wanted to pick up topic and start working and had little patience for mistakes which I made a lot in the beginning. I got very little time to absorb things on my own and since I am mostly a self taught person it was more difficult for me to work as per his schedule. He advised me to change advisor however no one in our department was working on the same topic and changing advisor would have meant changing topic of my PhD which I was not willing to do. So I just quit my PhD ,took two years break , did projects with other postdoc , faculties of different universities and currently have four papers under my belt. Have very strong background on all advanced topics in Physics. And am extremely comfortable with research now ( something I was not during my first PhD since I have had time to absorb thing my way) I have managed to secure two letter of recommendations which are not from my ex advisor. Although we ended up on amicable terms , his opinion was that I am not going to make a successful researcher so we are not in contact anymore. My question is 1.In SoP how do I exactly define the reason for quitting first PhD while I am looking for PhD on same topic second time as well. 2.How is the gap , quitting PhD going to affect my applications? What are my chances of getting selected. I am mainly planning to apply to Europe.
  23. Hopeless_Academic

    PhD Applications Fall '18 Season

    I thought I'd go ahead and start this up. Where are you all applying and in what field? I'm applying for PhD programs in NT, but have yet to finalize my list of schools. Currently, I'm considering applying to: Baylor, Emory, Duke, Duke Div, Notre Dame, PTS, Yale. I may add some schools before all is said and done. Faculty changes have made it harder to narrow down my list. It seems like many senior faculty decided to retire around the same time! I'm thinking of Yale (Attridge and Dale Martin), Emory (LTJ and Holladay), and ND (Moss left, so she didn't retire, but they now only have two NT profs).
  24. Hi! It is 15th February 2018 and I have not received the email about the resolution of my application... Does anyone receive something? Thanks!
  25. I wanted to say THANK YOU to this great group of supportive people. I've been working on getting into a PhD program for the last two years, and I finally got in!!!!! Last year was incredibly deflating as rejection after rejection poured in. After wallowing for a little bit (but not too long, I have a family with one small kiddo at the time and another kiddo that was born right in the middle of the rejections, so I was quickly distracted by life), I made a plan to try again. As I told one of my recommenders "As with any setback, I am taking this as an opportunity to regroup, reassess, and improve." Below is a description of what I did, in case it's helpful to anyone else out there who finds themselves in the same position this year (if so, you can still do it!). I reached out to every school that had said no (all 13 of them), and bugged anyone who would pick up a phone or answer and email to figure out what happened. It was really two buckets: Bad fit of program with my research, or I was simply not in the top 2-5 applicants. So, I did three big things to close the gap and increase my odds: First I started from scratch on defining what my research interests actually are by constructing a realistic research topic I could dive into on day one, and then sticking with that in every conversation. This helped me rapidly filter programs that didn't match, and quickly gave me new leads in conversations ("We don't do that sort of behavioral operations work here, but Professor XYZ at school ABC is an expert. Let me send her an email") Next I did something very practical: I retook the GRE. And this time I really studied for it! I actually bought an online course (Magoosh if anyone is interested) and listened to every lecture and did every practice problem (all 1200+ of them). After three months of work on nights and over my lunch breaks, I went from 76th percentile in quantitative reasoning to 92nd percentile. I also improved my other scores (got a perfect verbal the second time), but that quant score came up during my interviews repeatedly. Will knowing how to quickly find the number of non-repeating diagonals in an arbitrary n-gon help me in my PhD studies? No. But I finally had a score that matched my ability to learn and it made an incredible difference this year in opening doors. Finally, I did something radical. I quit my job. Technically, I formed an independent consulting firm to work on non-traditional projects, which I really did do! It just also gave me the flexibility to physically drive to campuses around the East Coast and meet faculty and students in person. I was literally checking doors to see if they were locked and wandering into offices to introduce myself. Forming that company has been a terrible financial decision (man I miss corporate healthcare), but it gave me the flexibility to become a known face when my application came up for review. Face-Time = Name-Recognition = Success The result: Multiple acceptances, including to my absolute top choice, and incredible connections at many fine research institutions that I will be able to use in the years ahead! Plus no wallowing! The entire time, I was looking here at The Grad Cafe and reading about other's work and experiences applying, both failures and successes. The stories here, and genuine heartfelt support and advice was one of the things that kept me going. Thank you all for your support, and good luck to those still reaching for the dream!
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