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Found 20 results

  1. I am an international female student from Palestine. I am interested in pursuing biostatistics PhD for Fall 2020 in USA. I have a high GPA and I'm the top of my class in both bachelor and master studies, but my research/work experience is not very impressive. I am confident that my LORs are very strong. I would really appreciate your thoughts about my chances in acceptance to graduate schools in the US this coming year. Undergrad Institution: TOP 5 Local University Major: Math GPA: 97% Grad Institution: TOP 2 University in Jordan Degree: MS in Math, (Thesis in statistics, using Monte Carlo simulations in SAS), with Scholarship from DAAD GPA: 4.26 (out of 4.3) Student: International, female Courses: BS/ Calculus (I, II, III), Principles of Mathematics, Linear Algebra (I, II), Principles of Statistics, Discrete Mathematics, Ordinary Differential Equations (I, II), Numerical Analysis, Abstract Algebra (I, II), Vector Analysis, Probability, Special Functions, Real Analysis (I, II), Mathematical Statistics, Functional Analysis, Number Theory, Topology, Complex Analysis, Partial Differential Equations, Selected Topics in Mathematics (Fuzzy Set Theory). [ALL Straight A+] MS/ Advanced Methods of Applied Math, Abstract Algebra, Real Analysis, Numerical Analysis, Probability Theory, Linear Programming, Special Topics in Math (Fractional Calculus). [ALL Straight A+, too] GRE: 167 Q, 156 V, 3.0 AW TOEFL: test date Dec 7 Research/Work Experience: Two research projects with my adviser, but the papers are still to be published soon. I've just started my first job as a lecturer. I am teaching three undergraduate math courses at a local university (Linear Algebra, Numerical Analysis + Matlab Application, Complex Analysis). Applying to: University of Florida Boston University Emory University University of Pittsburgh University of Kentucky Virginia Commonwealth University University of Illinois at Chicago Do you have any suggestions for better school matches ? Thank you in advance!
  2. Hey all! I'm looking for advice on where to apply, and an idea of where I'd get into for Fall 2020. I’m looking for schools that also have a PhD program in case I decide to keep going after Master's. I know my grades are not the highest and my GRE isn’t the best either, but I’m hoping I still have a chance. Thanks for your help! Undergrad Institution: Big state school Major(s): Statistics & Math Minor(s): n/a GPA: 3.758 Type of Student: Domestic white female GRE General Test: Q: 159 (70%) V: 153 (60%) W: 4.5 (81%) (Taking again soon, hoping to bring Q to 80%) GRE Subject Test in Mathematics: M: N/a TOEFL Score: N/a Programs Applying: MS in Biostatistics Research Experience: Did a Summer institute in biostatistics (SIBS) Program Awards/Honors/Recognitions: STEM Scholarship, deans list (all semesters but 1), university scholarship, math honor society, scholars program Pertinent Activities or Jobs: Math grader Letters of Recommendation: Professor for two of my stat courses (knows me well), instructor from SIBS (worked on research project together), mentor from STEM scholarship (knows me extremely well, but not in stat). Math/Statistics Grades: Calc I (AP), Calc II (B+), Vector Calc (A), Statistical Methods I and II (A, A), Linear Algebra (B+), Probability (B), Math Stat (B), Intro to Experimental Design (A), Transition to Adv. Math (A), Vector Analysis (A), Algebraic Structures (C) Currently taking: Theory of Statistical Inference, Computing in Statistics, Big Data Analytics, Analysis, and Ordinary Differential Equations (Also have 2 transfer courses in biostat from SIBS program both with A's) Any Miscellaneous Points that Might Help: Graduating a year early, almost all math and stat classes are 500-level with lots of theory Applying to Where: Duke Colorado - Denver UNC Boston (MS or MA) Emory Tulane Brown Probably some other (pls help)
  3. Undergrad Institution: big midwest state school ( ranked <30 on statistics) Major(s): math and stat double GPA: 3.83 Type of Student: international female Grad Institution: not good private school (ranked 50-70 on stat US News) Concentration: statistics MS GPA: 4.0 GRE General Test: Q: 170 V: 151 (52%) W: 3.5 (<50%) GRE Subject Test in Mathematics: M: took two years ago, did really bad TOEFL Score: N/A Programs Applying: Statistics and Biostatistics PhD Research Experience: Summer data analysis in a biology lab, haven't done much, only used basic lm and glm. Another biostat related machine learning summer research in an ivy school, may publish paper, not sure if it can be first author Awards/Honors/Recognitions: 2 years Dean's list for undergrad, tuition fellowship for MS program Pertinent Activities or Jobs: tutored for a year, TAed for a year. Both are for introductory stat undergraduate classes. Letters of Recommendation: 1 my advisor for my master program, took his class and got an A. 2 chair of the department, took his class and got an A. 3 research supervisor from the ivy school Math/Statistics Grades: Have taken a good amount of undergraduate math courses, got mostly A's, only 2 B+. Have taken master level probability and statistics (Casella & Berger) (A). Also took some applied statistics courses on both undergrad and grad levels. Any Miscellaneous Points that Might Help: currently in a stat master program, and plan to take two PhD level probability and inference in Fall 2019 I want to apply to biostat phd program in Columbia, UCLA, Penn, Yale, Brown, BU, Duke, UNC and UMN, and stat PhD in UCLA , JHU, NCSU and UC Irvine. But I have no idea if the goal is too high for me? Which should be reasonable schools to apply? Also, my GRE score is one of my biggest concerns. Should I take GRE again to improve my verbal and writing? I don't know if GRE score is that important...
  4. Hello, I'm an international student studying medicine in a country where med schools are typically undergraudate courses like the UK (2 year premed + 4 year med course). Currently, I'm planning to study biostatistics (especially focus on statistical/population genetics) in grad school but I have little information about it since very few people (almost none) apply to biostat from my department. I double majored mathematics at my premed years: GPA around 3.9/4.0, also took some graduate level math courses (graduate real analysis, mathematical algorithms etc), however, the gpa on med courses aren't as good as my math gpa (somewhere around 3.3~3.5 depending on the remaining semesters). It seems that GPA of 3.3~3.5 isn't really a nice one compared to most applicants applying to biostat. So my two questions are.. 1. Does having an MD helpful when applying to biostat departments? 2. How are GPAs in med schools considered when applying to grad schools?
  5. Hi all, Hope everything is well for all of you! Congrats for those who got their invitations and offers! I'm not sure if there's anyone in looking at this post and is at the same stage as me: got nothing but only rejection letters (5/9). I applied for 9 PhD programs and haven't heard from Harvard, Princeton, Stanford and UCB, but I see in the cafe that many people have got their invitations, and the interview dates are reasonably close. (One of the disadvatages I have is that I'm an international student, thus we are considered separately because of funding issue.) As a result, I need to move on and work on my plan B. With all the advice I've got from friends, grad students and professors, I don't feel ready to make a solid plan by myself. Thus, I'm posting this up, and, hopefully, we can all share some ideas on how to make an alternative plan. So here's something about me (I'm not sure how detailed should I go for, please let me know if it's not appropriate): I'm currently a senior, international student at UMass Amherst. I'm finishing a dual degree in biology and mathematics (applied/stats track). I have a 3.977/4.000 GPA, and received 40k+ scholarships over the years. In addition to my academic live, I also have 3 years of experience tutoring and 2 years of volunteering (BBBS kid mentoring program). I've only taken GRE once, and I have Q168, V151 and 3.5 (I'll definitely make this looks better if I apply next cycle or later). I'm in the honors college and doing a thesis. I have been in a plant genetics lab since the second month of freshman year, where I had various experience with wet lab experiments and bioinformatics/systems biology analysis. I am co-authoring a paper that will be submitted in February which is about analyzing and interpreting an RNAseq dataset. I'm working with this PI for the 4th year and he said that wrote me a very promising letter. In addition to working with plants, I also had research experience during summers working with mammalian telomeres and interned at MRL at Boston on immuno-oncology targets. As for the computational aspect, my work on analyzing data in lab required me to use R, python and bash scripting. I also had intermediate/entry/entry levels of experience with SAS/Matlab/Java from project-based math/stats courses. My original plan is to go straightly for umbrella PhD programs, which covered computational biology or systems biology. I want to use my advantage where I can do both biology and mathematics and to work in interdisciplinary fields. My passion originated from doing experiments, so I still want to keep up with my web lab skills (i.e. doing gene editing according to the results from computational analysis) which I think would also be valuable when I look for jobs later. For long term goal, I would like to work in the R&D parts of the pharmaceutical industry. From the conversations I had with my co-workers during my internship, career-wise, it would be very helpful to have a PhD degree. Also, I don't want to limit myself to plant biology, so I need the transaction to focus on other systems. Also I want to keep all the lab work I deal with in vitro. However, since the plan going for PhD directly didn't work out well, I need to start thinking alternatives. I think my CV would look better in a year or two when the paper is published (there's another one data analysis based that I'm working on as the first author). Also, there's a gap in between the data analysis I do in the bio lab and what I learned from my math/stats courses: I didn't have experience developing computational/statistical tools. I think it may be a solid plan to do something to fill in that gap. The first thing I'm thinking of is getting a master in biostats. Although the deadlines for submitting applications have passed for a lot of good schools, I'm exploring options that are still available (i.e. Brown, UMich, UMinnesota, UCD, UPittsburgh, CWRU and UMass). One question I have is how much a biostat master degree would help if I want to go back to applying biomedical/compuational PhD programs? I do believe a master in biostats will open a lot of doors if I want to look for jobs, also if I want to switch to tracks such as data science. From what I have seen, all biostats programs offer the opportunity to do a thesis, however, if I want to apply to PhDs during the second year of my master, I don't think the thesis will be ready for publishing and I'm not sure how much points that will add to my application. So should I go for a thesis if I end up going to a master program? The good thing is that, if I stay in the same school, I can finish the master with only one additional year. That being said, if I apply for PhD programs in the next application cycle, a thesis would definitely not in time. Yet, all the courses I take will be very coding heavy and project-oriented so would expand my skill-sets on the computational aspects dramatically. I'm not sure how many bio/mcb master programs are still available now. If not going for biostat programs, I hope to get into schools that may help with my applications later. So please let me know if there's any program worth going for a try. I know the last option I have is the MCB MS at my school, which there's no doubt that I'll get into. One of the reasons I didn't think much of this option is that I need to take classes during the PhD programs anyway so I'd rather do something that I can learn more with the same amount of time and effort. Another option is looking for jobs and gets experiences while working. As an international undergrad, I think it's hard for me to look for jobs in the US (although I have the 36 months OPT available), especially jobs that I can learn as much as a master program. It's hard to imagine finding a job that will allow me to do things that I don't know before (I'm still thinking about filling the gap in my experience/skills). With everything going on in the U.S., I was advised that it's not such a bad idea to look for PhD programs in Europe, since I'll be international anyway. However I have no idea how this would work, so please let me know how I should start looking and what I should be expecting if going to graduate programs in Europe. One addtional note is about grad school funding. My parents are funding me for undergrad (although I tried very hard to get as many scholarships as possible), and they can and are willing to fund for my tuition for master and PhD. However, I find it very not helpful when programs as me to bring my own funding while applying for PhD programs. I completed my undergrad in the U.S. so I'm not eligible for a lot of funding from my own country, also I don't want to sign contracts that force me to go back to work for a few years right after graduation (I'm not against going back but I want to keep all options available). And, to my knowledge, there's no scholarship that I can apply to before being admitted to a program (NSF grant requires citizenship). That leaves me no option to bring my own funding while applying, which makes me less competitive among international or all applicants. I appologized that this is getting way longer that I planned for. Thank you if you have read this far. I'm just going to summary some major questions that I need help with: 1. What can I do better if I apply to PhD programs in the future? (Umbrella programs aiming for computation-based track). Are there any not famous but good phd programs that I can still apply for? I know WPI is still rolling and have a lab that may fit my interest according to a professor I talked to. 2. Is it worth it going for a master in biostats? Is a thesis helpful if it won't be ready as a submitted paper? How much help would it give to a future PhD application (systems bio/computational bio)? What specific programs that are still available? Would I be competitive for such programs? 3. Are there any worthy bio-based (i.e. mcb) master programs still open? 4. Guidelines for looking for jobs as an international undergrad. Is it possible that I can learn how to do more complicated computational analysis even if I had little experience with it before? (Although I can learn from colleagues, I imagine companies will want me to do things that I'm already good at.) 5. Where can I find possible fundings for grad school as an international student? The search engines don't really help much before one is admitted to a program. 6. Any other advice or question? 7. Thanks for reading all these! All the best luck for all of you!
  6. Hi all, Hope everything is well for all of you! Congrats for those who got their invitations and offers! I'm not sure if there's anyone in looking at this post and is at the same stage as me: got nothing but only rejection letters (5/9). I applied for 9 PhD programs and haven't heard from Harvard, Princeton, Stanford and UCB, but I see in the cafe that many people have got their invitations, and the interview dates are reasonably close. (One of the disadvatages I have is that I'm an international student, thus we are considered separately because of funding issue.) As a result, I need to move on and work on my plan B. With all the advice I've got from friends, grad students and professors, I don't feel ready to make a solid plan by myself. Thus, I'm posting this up, and, hopefully, we can all share some ideas on how to make an alternative plan. So here's something about me (I'm not sure how detailed should I go for, please let me know if it's not appropriate): I'm currently a senior, international student at UMass Amherst. I'm finishing a dual degree in biology and mathematics (applied/stats track). I have a 3.977/4.000 GPA, and received 40k+ scholarships over the years. In addition to my academic live, I also have 3 years of experience tutoring and 2 years of volunteering (BBBS kid mentoring program). I've only taken GRE once, and I have Q168, V151 and 3.5 (I'll definitely make this looks better if I apply next cycle or later). I'm in the honors college and doing a thesis. I have been in a plant genetics lab since the second month of freshman year, where I had various experience with wet lab experiments and bioinformatics/systems biology analysis. I am co-authoring a paper that will be submitted in February which is about analyzing and interpreting an RNAseq dataset. I'm working with this PI for the 4th year and he said that wrote me a very promising letter. In addition to working with plants, I also had research experience during summers working with mammalian telomeres and interned at MRL at Boston on immuno-oncology targets. As for the computational aspect, my work on analyzing data in lab required me to use R, python and bash scripting. I also had intermediate/entry/entry levels of experience with SAS/Matlab/Java from project-based math/stats courses. My original plan is to go straightly for umbrella PhD programs, which covered computational biology or systems biology. I want to use my advantage where I can do both biology and mathematics and to work in interdisciplinary fields. My passion originated from doing experiments, so I still want to keep up with my web lab skills (i.e. doing gene editing according to the results from computational analysis) which I think would also be valuable when I look for jobs later. For long term goal, I would like to work in the R&D parts of the pharmaceutical industry. From the conversations I had with my co-workers during my internship, career-wise, it would be very helpful to have a PhD degree. Also, I don't want to limit myself to plant biology, so I need the transaction to focus on other systems. Also I want to keep all the lab work I deal with in vitro. However, since the plan going for PhD directly didn't work out well, I need to start thinking alternatives. I think my CV would look better in a year or two when the paper is published (there's another one data analysis based that I'm working on as the first author). Also, there's a gap in between the data analysis I do in the bio lab and what I learned from my math/stats courses: I didn't have experience developing computational/statistical tools. I think it may be a solid plan to do something to fill in that gap. The first thing I'm thinking of is getting a master in biostats. Although the deadlines for submitting applications have passed for a lot of good schools, I'm exploring options that are still available (i.e. Brown, UMich, UMinnesota, UCD, UPittsburgh, CWRU and UMass). One question I have is how much a biostat master degree would help if I want to go back to applying biomedical/compuational PhD programs? I do believe a master in biostats will open a lot of doors if I want to look for jobs, also if I want to switch to tracks such as data science. From what I have seen, all biostats programs offer the opportunity to do a thesis, however, if I want to apply to PhDs during the second year of my master, I don't think the thesis will be ready for publishing and I'm not sure how much points that will add to my application. So should I go for a thesis if I end up going to a master program? The good thing is that, if I stay in the same school, I can finish the master with only one additional year. That being said, if I apply for PhD programs in the next application cycle, a thesis would definitely not in time. Yet, all the courses I take will be very coding heavy and project-oriented so would expand my skill-sets on the computational aspects dramatically. I'm not sure how many bio/mcb master programs are still available now. If not going for biostat programs, I hope to get into schools that may help with my applications later. So please let me know if there's any program worth going for a try. I know the last option I have is the MCB MS at my school, which there's no doubt that I'll get into. One of the reasons I didn't think much of this option is that I need to take classes during the PhD programs anyway so I'd rather do something that I can learn more with the same amount of time and effort. Another option is looking for jobs and gets experiences while working. As an international undergrad, I think it's hard for me to look for jobs in the US (although I have the 36 months OPT available), especially jobs that I can learn as much as a master program. It's hard to imagine finding a job that will allow me to do things that I don't know before (I'm still thinking about filling the gap in my experience/skills). With everything going on in the U.S., I was advised that it's not such a bad idea to look for PhD programs in Europe, since I'll be international anyway. However I have no idea how this would work, so please let me know how I should start looking and what I should be expecting if going to graduate programs in Europe. One addtional note is about grad school funding. My parents are funding me for undergrad (although I tried very hard to get as many scholarships as possible), and they can and are willing to fund for my tuition for master and PhD. However, I find it very not helpful when programs as me to bring my own funding while applying for PhD programs. I completed my undergrad in the U.S. so I'm not eligible for a lot of funding from my own country, also I don't want to sign contracts that force me to go back to work for a few years right after graduation (I'm not against going back but I want to keep all options available). And, to my knowledge, there's no scholarship that I can apply to before being admitted to a program (NSF grant requires citizenship). That leaves me no option to bring my own funding while applying, which makes me less competitive among international or all applicants. I appologized that this is getting way longer that I planned for. Thank you if you have read this far. I'm just going to summary some major questions that I need help with: 1. What can I do better if I apply to PhD programs in the future? (Umbrella programs aiming for computation-based track). Are there any not famous but good phd programs that I can still apply for? I know WPI is still rolling and have a lab that may fit my interest according to a professor I talked to. 2. Is it worth it going for a master in biostats? Is a thesis helpful if it won't be ready as a submitted paper? How much help would it give to a future PhD application (systems bio/computational bio)? What specific programs that are still available? Would I be competitive for such programs? 3. Are there any worthy bio-based (i.e. mcb) master programs still open? 4. Guidelines for looking for jobs as an international undergrad. Is it possible that I can learn how to do more complicated computational analysis even if I had little experience with it before? (Although I can learn from colleagues, I imagine companies will want me to do things that I'm already good at.) 5. Where can I find possible fundings for grad school as an international student? The search engines don't really help much before one is admitted to a program. 6. Any other advice or question? 7. Thanks for reading all these! All the best luck for all of you!
  7. Hi all, Hope everything is well for all of you! Congrats for those who got their invitations and offers! I'm not sure if there's anyone in looking at this post and is at the same stage as me: got nothing but only rejection letters (5/9). I applied for 9 PhD programs and haven't heard from Harvard, Princeton, Stanford and UCB, but I see in the cafe that many people have got their invitations, and the interview dates are reasonably close. (One of the disadvatages I have is that I'm an international student, thus we are considered separately because of funding issue.) As a result, I need to move on and work on my plan B. With all the advice I've got from friends, grad students and professors, I don't feel ready to make a solid plan by myself. Thus, I'm posting this up, and, hopefully, we can all share some ideas on how to make an alternative plan. So here's something about me (I'm not sure how detailed should I go for, please let me know if it's not appropriate): I'm currently a senior, international student at UMass Amherst. I'm finishing a dual degree in biology and mathematics (applied/stats track). I have a 3.977/4.000 GPA, and received 40k+ scholarships over the years. In addition to my academic live, I also have 3 years of experience tutoring and 2 years of volunteering (BBBS kid mentoring program). I've only taken GRE once, and I have Q168, V151 and 3.5 (I'll definitely make this looks better if I apply next cycle or later). I'm in the honors college and doing a thesis. I have been in a plant genetics lab since the second month of freshman year, where I had various experience with wet lab experiments and bioinformatics/systems biology analysis. I am co-authoring a paper that will be submitted in February which is about analyzing and interpreting an RNAseq dataset. I'm working with this PI for the 4th year and he said that wrote me a very promising letter. In addition to working with plants, I also had research experience during summers working with mammalian telomeres and interned at MRL at Boston on immuno-oncology targets. As for the computational aspect, my work on analyzing data in lab required me to use R, python and bash scripting. I also had intermediate/entry/entry levels of experience with SAS/Matlab/Java from project-based math/stats courses. My original plan is to go straightly for umbrella PhD programs, which covered computational biology or systems biology. I want to use my advantage where I can do both biology and mathematics and to work in interdisciplinary fields. My passion originated from doing experiments, so I still want to keep up with my web lab skills (i.e. doing gene editing according to the results from computational analysis) which I think would also be valuable when I look for jobs later. For long term goal, I would like to work in the R&D parts of the pharmaceutical industry. From the conversations I had with my co-workers during my internship, career-wise, it would be very helpful to have a PhD degree. Also, I don't want to limit myself to plant biology, so I need the transaction to focus on other systems. Also I want to keep all the lab work I deal with in vitro. However, since the plan going for PhD directly didn't work out well, I need to start thinking alternatives. I think my CV would look better in a year or two when the paper is published (there's another one data analysis based that I'm working on as the first author). Also, there's a gap in between the data analysis I do in the bio lab and what I learned from my math/stats courses: I didn't have experience developing computational/statistical tools. I think it may be a solid plan to do something to fill in that gap. The first thing I'm thinking of is getting a master in biostats. Although the deadlines for submitting applications have passed for a lot of good schools, I'm exploring options that are still available (i.e. Brown, UMich, UMinnesota, UCD, UPittsburgh, CWRU and UMass). One question I have is how much a biostat master degree would help if I want to go back to applying biomedical/compuational PhD programs? I do believe a master in biostats will open a lot of doors if I want to look for jobs, also if I want to switch to tracks such as data science. From what I have seen, all biostats programs offer the opportunity to do a thesis, however, if I want to apply to PhDs during the second year of my master, I don't think the thesis will be ready for publishing and I'm not sure how much points that will add to my application. So should I go for a thesis if I end up going to a master program? The good thing is that, if I stay in the same school, I can finish the master with only one additional year. That being said, if I apply for PhD programs in the next application cycle, a thesis would definitely not in time. Yet, all the courses I take will be very coding heavy and project-oriented so would expand my skill-sets on the computational aspects dramatically. I'm not sure how many bio/mcb master programs are still available now. If not going for biostat programs, I hope to get into schools that may help with my applications later. So please let me know if there's any program worth going for a try. I know the last option I have is the MCB MS at my school, which there's no doubt that I'll get into. One of the reasons I didn't think much of this option is that I need to take classes during the PhD programs anyway so I'd rather do something that I can learn more with the same amount of time and effort. Another option is looking for jobs and gets experiences while working. As an international undergrad, I think it's hard for me to look for jobs in the US (although I have the 36 months OPT available), especially jobs that I can learn as much as a master program. It's hard to imagine finding a job that will allow me to do things that I don't know before (I'm still thinking about filling the gap in my experience/skills). With everything going on in the U.S., I was advised that it's not such a bad idea to look for PhD programs in Europe, since I'll be international anyway. However I have no idea how this would work, so please let me know how I should start looking and what I should be expecting if going to graduate programs in Europe. One addtional note is about grad school funding. My parents are funding me for undergrad (although I tried very hard to get as many scholarships as possible), and they can and are willing to fund for my tuition for master and PhD. However, I find it very not helpful when programs as me to bring my own funding while applying for PhD programs. I completed my undergrad in the U.S. so I'm not eligible for a lot of funding from my own country, also I don't want to sign contracts that force me to go back to work for a few years right after graduation (I'm not against going back but I want to keep all options available). And, to my knowledge, there's no scholarship that I can apply to before being admitted to a program (NSF grant requires citizenship). That leaves me no option to bring my own funding while applying, which makes me less competitive among international or all applicants. I appologized that this is getting way longer that I planned for. Thank you if you have read this far. I'm just going to summary some major questions that I need help with: 1. What can I do better if I apply to PhD programs in the future? (Umbrella programs aiming for computation-based track). Are there any not famous but good phd programs that I can still apply for? I know WPI is still rolling and have a lab that may fit my interest according to a professor I talked to. 2. Is it worth it going for a master in biostats? Is a thesis helpful if it won't be ready as a submitted paper? How much help would it give to a future PhD application (systems bio/computational bio)? What specific programs that are still available? Would I be competitive for such programs? 3. Are there any worthy bio-based (i.e. mcb) master programs still open? 4. Guidelines for looking for jobs as an international undergrad. Is it possible that I can learn how to do more complicated computational analysis even if I had little experience with it before? (Although I can learn from colleagues, I imagine companies will want me to do things that I'm already good at.) 5. Where can I find possible fundings for grad school as an international student? The search engines don't really help much before one is admitted to a program. 6. Any other advice or question? 7. Thanks for reading all these! All the best luck for all of you!
  8. Undergraduate Institution: Small Southern University Major: Mathematics Minor: Physics GPA: overall: 3.73 Math: 3.66 (I had one rough semester of mostly B's and one A that I will explain the extenuating circumstances behind) Type of Student: Domestic White Female Courses Taken: Intro to Mathematical Proofs (A), Differential Equations (B), Probability and Statistics (A), Intro to Abstract Algebra I (B), Intro to Real Analysis I (A), Calculus 3 (B), Statics (B), Mechanics (B) THIS Semester (intended grade): Functions of a Complex Variable (A), Discrete Mathematics (A), Computational Tech in Physics (A), Undergrad Research in Statistics (A) ** note that the schools currently on my list will receive this semester's grades as their deadlines will be after grades are due GRE General: Q: 183 (83 %tile) V: 158 (80 %tile) W: 4.0 (59 %tile) (Plan on retaking as my practice tests had my in the 90+% for quant) Subject test: TBD Programs Applying: A mix of OR, Biostat, and one ME MS Research Experience: Currently working on an honors thesis focusing on the PDE heat equation and hopefully finding an accurate experimental way to model it in two dimensions so I can then model via program and mathematically. I am also required to do a senior project which will be based on the combinatorics or a particular board game Awards/Honors/Recognitions: Dean's list a few semesters, Honors graduate, graduating a four year program in only three years, a few university scholarships Letters Of Recommendation: Two confirmed. One from a professor I had for linear algebra, proofs, and abstract. The other I had for calculus three, differential equations, and complex variable and he is also my thesis adviser. Next Semester Schedule: Numerical Analysis, Stochastic Processes, and either Abstract Alegbra 2 OR Nonlinear Dynamics and Chaos (any suggestions here would also be appreciated) Schools: ( I appreciate any and all guidance, especially in this category) ME MS- Boston University's LEAP (engineering masters program for non engineering undergrads) OR Programs (MS unless otherwise noted) NCSU Simon Fraser Ohio State Bowling Green GT- (i have a fee waiver, so why not?) *PHD Biostat Programs (MS unless otherwise noted) Louisville Northwestern Iowa UNC University of Georgia Georgetown Thank you for any and all feedback! *Note that this is only my third year so if i should stay another semester, that's also another option
  9. Hello everyone, I'm here asking for my friend who has been troubling for a long time about how to go. Her boyfriend has decided to go Umich, luckily she also has an admission of MS/PhD of the biostatistics program in Umich but without any financial support. She's now struggling about where to go. She also has offer from JHU biostat PhD with full funding. On consideration of her boyfriend, she's now more inclined to Umich. But she still has several questions. If there is anyone could help, she will be grateful. 1. Do any friend here have any suggestions on where to go? 2. She found almost anywhere but cannot know any official information about the alumni of biostatistics PhD program. Where do they usually go? AP or postdoc, or industry? 3. Is it possible to ask for funding after going to Umich, because the tuition is extremely expensive... Thanks in advance!
  10. I got into the MS Biostatistics programs at UT SPH, UIC(University of Illinois at Chicago). Unfortunately, both no funding. I need help deciding which one to choose. Are these different school UT SPH(University of Texas Health Science Center) and GSBS UTH? Biostat1. Harvard, Hopkins, Washington4. UNC5. Michigan6. Berkeley7. Minnesota, Wisconsin9. Columbia, UCLA, UT MD Anderson12. Penn, Yale14. Emory15. Brown, Duke, Vanderbilt18. BU, UC Davis20. Florida, Iowa, Rochester, UT Houston24. Medical College of Wisconsin25. Illinois Chicago26. Case Western27. Colorado Denver28. Massachusetts Amherst29. South Carolina, SUNY Buffalo31. Kansas, Alabama33. SUNY Albany, Cincinnati, VCU According to US News rank, It seems like UT Houston over Illinois Chicago. If anybody can share their insights about the program, and also about the job scenario in Houston or Chicago then it would be really helpful.
  11. Hello! I am very stuck between Michigan and Emory right now. I know Michigan has a better biostatistics program than Emory. But in terms of location, I like Atlanta way better than Ann Arbor. In addition, I think the coursework (and the Qual) at Michigan might also be much harder than Emory. My plan after graduation is to find a job (Pharma/Tech/Consulting), so will there be a huge difference between these two programs? I know PhD students at Emory can find an outside intern job during the summer. I'm not sure if I could do the same at Michigan. Any comments are very welcomed, like the pros and cons for each of them? Thanks! I appreciate that very much.
  12. Hi, I am currently selecting courses for my last semester in college and will apply for 2019 fall biostat MS programs. I need some advice on which to choose from 3 courses: Applied Algebra (grad level), Discrete Mathematics, and Categorical Data Analysis (grad level). I am leaning towards taking Applied Algebra since it's more proof-based and I've learned from this forum that math courses carry more weight than stat courses in the process of application. I still would like to know what you guys think about these 3 courses. Thanks in advance for any advice!
  13. I see that some schools have sent out interview requests for programs i applied to. If i didnt get a request yet, does that mean out?
  14. I've narrowed down my final two choices for a PhD beginning Fall '17 to Johns Hopkins University's Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics (School of Engineering) and Brown University's Department of Biostatistics (School of Public Health). I've been accepted at both. I'm interested in applied statistics (I have work experience in data science and an M.S. already), so biostatistics sounds like a natural fit. I'm curious about the reputation of the Brown program. It seems small but mighty! My concern is that by going to Brown, I'm throwing away the opportunity to rub shoulders with JHU Biostatistics (they rejected me), but I suspect it's better to like the department you're in rather than the department you're near. I haven't heard much about JHU AMS. Thanks in advance for your $0.02.
  15. I am currently applying to biostatistics masters programs and would love any insight or recommendations or just a general evaluation of my profile, recommendations or advice please! Undergrad Institution: Boston University Major: Math + Statistics GPA: 3.31 Type of student: Domestic white female GRE: Quant: 162, Verbal: 160, W: waiting to hear Relevant Courses (in order of completion): Calc 1 - A ; Stats 1 - A; Calc 2 - A; Stats 2 - B; Linear Algebra - B+; Calc 3 - C+; Regression Analysis - B+, ANOVA - A; Probability - B; Java 1: - B+; Databases -A; Mathematical Stats - B-; Stochastic Processes - A; Statistical Computing - A-; Linear Models - A; R Programming - A; Biological Database Analysis - A; Practical Skills for Biostatistics - A; Clinical Trials - A-; Java 2 - B+ Letters of recommendation: Clinical Trials and ANOVA Professor - Strong SIBS + Statistical Computing Professor - Strong Computational Biology Internship Advisor - Strong Misc: 1 Summer of SIBS // 7 month computational biology internship at a pharmaceutical company // currently in my 6th month working as a data analyst at a small healthcare company // 3 semesters deans list Concerns: GPA and low scores in some classes... specifically Calc 3. GRE Scores may not be high enough to get into top schools. I feel good about my chances at UIC and CSPH but not sure about the others. Schools: Brown University; Boston University; Columbia University; Northwestern University; University of Illinois at Chicago; Colorado School of Public Health Thanks so much in advance!
  16. I am a Biology major / Statistics minor applying to programs in Statistics and Biostatistics. I received (flat) C's in both Cell Biology and Genetics (and the rest of the Bio grades were not all A's lol)...so I've been concerned lately about how admissions committees will view these. I've heard people say you're wasting your time to apply if you have C's in the undergrad courses directly related to your prospective graduate study. I guess what I'm wondering is... Is Biology considered DIRECTLY related to Biostat in this way? From my perspective, I consider these as somewhat irrelevant to my future interests. I've spoken with many graduate students in Biostatistics who told me their experiences have had far stronger focus on Statistics than on Biology course material (and the most Bio they took was Epidemiology). In my statement I emphasize that my specific interests are in clinical and pharmaceutical applications of statistics. I know maybe I'm just being silly... But I can't help but wonder constantly how admission committees will look upon my less-than-stellar Bio grades. Sorry for rambling, but thank you for reading this I know it's not fair to ask for judgments on my strength as an applicant on the whole with only this tiny bit of information, so I'm not asking for that--just about the strength of connection adcoms draw between bio and biostat in general >< I can tell that the C's certainly aren't helping my application, but how much do you suppose they'll hurt? Any brief input / insight at all would really be greatly appreciated!!!!
  17. Hi guys, Not sure if anyone will be kind enough to respond, but here goes. I'm a California resident, and finances do matter since I'll be taking out loans. I got into a few masters programs: 1. UCLA M.S Biostat 2. Emory M.S Biostat 3. University of Michigan M.S Biostat 4. Brown University M.S Biostat Waitlisted for University of Chicago M.S Statistics I don't think I received any financial aid for any of the programs but Brown is offering me about 25% off my tuition which is roughly $51,000. Anybody have any opinions?
  18. I started undergraduate as a Bio Major. I'm set to graduate with my BS in Biology spring of 2013... However, I really enjoy statistics and I enjoyed my Biostat class more than any other I've taken ( I got an A in it)... My GPA is currently 3.4 and rising (I'm recovering from one bad 2.6 semester my freshman year). I have yet to take the GRE, but plan to do so of course. I'd really like to pursue a career in Biostatistics, unfortunately I've only taken Calc I... Next year I plan on taking Calc II and Linear Algebra (Which seem to be the minimum math requirements for most programs). I'm also currently taking (and enjoying) a class in Computer applications of Statistics in which I'm learning SAS and R. Here are my questions (Sorry if they're obvious, but I cant seem to find much info about Biostat programs in general): What else can I do enhance my resume for Biostat Grad Program? Where can I find research/work opportunities that are relevant to the field of Biostats? I'd prefer to work in industry, specifically in clinical trials. Would a MS be sufficient, or should I look to pursue a PhD? How competitive is Grad School for Biostat programs in terms of GPA, GRE, experience, etc. (for both MS and PhD)? Thanks in advance for any advice, I appreciate it!
  19. Hi, I am currently a Statistics and Economics major in my Junior year at an accredited Big Ten university. I am hoping to go into Biostatistics after I graduate, but am having a lot of trouble finding admission statistics. Though obviously none of this is set in stone, this is an approximation of what my GPA's would look like. My Expected GPA's consist of: GPA: 3.298 Statistics GPA: 3.357 Math/Stat GPA: 3.293 Degree GPA: 3.443 College of Natural Science GPA (including Degree GPA): 3.472 Economics GPA: 3.600 GPA of classes excluding Stat, Math, and Econ: 3.115 My Relevent Courses: Biostatistics Calculus I-III Differential Equations Linear Algebra (Proof Emphasis) Algebra Based Statistics I Multivariate Probability Multivariate Statistics Actuarial Mathematics Statistical Computing Econometric I & II Introduction to Programming I am currently looking into going into the University of Michigan for either a M.S. in Biostatistics or a Ph.D in Biostatics, or possibly attending Grand Valley State University first to get an M.S. in Biostatistics and then attempt to get into UMich's Ph.D program. Do I have a good chance of getting into Michigan? I realize there are many variables but any insight would be nice. I don't have any intern experience but I do have volunteer work, tutoring experience, and have passed the Probability Exam P/1 for Actuaries. Any insight is appreciated; average GPA's, GRE's, acceptance rates, ect would be great!
  20. Hi, I am currently a Statistics and Economics major in my Junior year at an accredited Big Ten university. I am hoping to go into Biostatistics after I graduate, but am having a lot of trouble finding admission statistics. Though obviously none of this is set in stone, this is an approximation of what my GPA's would look like. My Expected GPA's consist of: GPA: 3.298 Statistics GPA: 3.357 Math/Stat GPA: 3.293 Degree GPA: 3.443 College of Natural Science GPA (including Degree GPA): 3.472 Economics GPA: 3.600 GPA of classes excluding Stat, Math, and Econ: 3.115 My Relevent Courses: Biostatistics Calculus I-III Differential Equations Linear Algebra (Proof Emphasis) Algebra Based Statistics I Multivariate Probability Multivariate Statistics Actuarial Mathematics Statistical Computing Econometric I & II Introduction to Programming I am currently looking into going into the University of Michigan for either a M.S. in Biostatistics or a Ph.D in Biostatics, or possibly attending Grand Valley State University first to get an M.S. in Biostatistics and then attempt to get into UMich's Ph.D program. Do I have a good chance of getting into Michigan? I realize there are many variables but any insight would be nice. I don't have any intern experience but I do have volunteer work, tutoring experience, and have passed the Probability Exam P/1 for Actuaries. Any insight is appreciated; average GPA's, GRE's, acceptance rates, ect would be great!
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