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Found 22 results

  1. DidoofCarthage

    Fall 2019 Applicants

    Hi guys. I've seen people in other areas begin threads for the Fall 2019 applicants, so I figured I would start the Classics thread. I'm graduating in May and working on applying to a large variety of Masters and Ph.D programs related to Classical Archaeology.
  2. hesiodandhomer

    Fall 2018 Applicants

    I'm applying to grad school for the upcoming cycle and I'm in a bit of an anxiety-laden state! Would love to hear from other people in this position I'm a senior at an Ivy-plus institution (think Duke, UChicago, Johns Hopkins etc) and I'm hoping to apply for a terminal Ph.D. in Mythological literature, especially from the archaic and classical periods. Right now I'm looking to apply to UT Austin, UNC, NYU, Columbia, Princeton, and maybe Duke, but I'm open to suggestions! My greatest concern right now is that while I did well my junior year, I had a bad freshman year so I have 2 B-'s on my transcript in intermediate Latin; I didnt take it my sophomore or junior years (focused on Greek) and I'm about to return to it for my senior year. My GPA is also not as high as I'd like it to be; i have a 3.6 both overall and in the major, which is probably on the low end for applications to these programs. Good luck to everyone!
  3. Hi, I'm currently an English undergrad student. But I'm planning to do my masters in Classics. (We'll narrow it down once we reach that bridge) I have zero background in the languages, Latin or ancient Greek and due to the lack of resources/programs (again, zero) in my country about classics, I have to apply to the programs offered by the universities abroad. Due to my lack of language background and to make up for three years of language requirement to get a PhD in Classics, I'm going to do a post baccalaureate. So I have my post bacc narrowed to three universities, but what I wanted to know if that's a fulfilling way to go on about it? Has anyone done a post bacc and then joined the masters in classics? And done a PhD? Is there any other way this can be achieved? Also, how is the student life during a post bacc, amount of hours and the study required? Because I do love the classics and I plan on making a future in academia in the same (I'm well aware of how terribly awful it sounds, a narrowing field with a dying subject)
  4. Hello out there! Any other fall 2018 Brandeis students on gradcafe? I just got into the Ancient Greek and Roman studies masters program today and will most likely be going - dependent on hearing back from one school. I’m planning a trip to visit the campus soon but would love to hear from anyone that has already been. If you have any recommendations for places to visit or potential neighborhoods to live in, I’d love to hear them! Looking forward to hearing from my fellow Brandeis students ?
  5. So, aside from Coursera and other similar MOOCs, what is the best way to keep up/up to date/refresh Classics information if you have a decently sized gap between your undergraduate degree and when you pursue your MA? I am currently getting my Master of Arts in Museum Studies, so aside from MOOCs or the University of Georgia Post-Bacc (which I would like to do but can't afford at the moment), what can I do to show my potential as a graduate student and show that I have not left the Classics/Classical Studies behind while I studied museum work and worked in a museum that is more history based with natural history and state history rather than a Classical collection. I have taken the free online courses from Coursera, Udemy, Hillsdale College, and so on, always related to the ancient world or Jewish folk in antiquity. I have recently began to work my way through my old Latin textbook and bought the workbook for it (since I did not have that in undergrad), and will soon do the same with my ancient Greek book. I don't have many opportunities in taking courses in person, as Las Vegas does not have any kind of Classics program and I don't have a lot of money that I can pay out of pocket for online courses. Is keeping up through self study and MOOCs enough for a three and a half year gap between when I graduated with my undergrad degree and when I plan on applying to my graduate degree? Or is it advised that I find a way to retake courses to brush up and get better grades than what I had previously?
  6. brighteyedathena

    FSU or Boulder for Classics MA?

    So, like many of you, I have a big decision to make. I need to choose between two Classics MA programs: FSU and Boulder. As of right now, FSU is offering me full funding. I'm on the waitlist for funding at Boulder, but I've been told I'm near the top of the list so getting funding is possible. I haven't been able to visit, but Boulder's program sounds amazing and they have two faculty there who are very closely related to my interests. One person in particular sounds like she would be an obvious choice to be my thesis advisor when the time comes. Boulder is also a very liberal place, which is important to me since I'm gay and very politically active. Howvever, I know it's also a very expensive place to live, and I've been told that the grad students there are very stressed and not very friendly. I'm not sure what the culture of the program is and I don't know if the stipend they offer is really enough to live on. On the other side of things, I visited FSU recently and I got really good vibes from the faculty and other grad students. Most of them seemed very friendly and personable, and also very willing to help you find jobs and experience even if you decide academia isn't for you. They also have a Museum Studies certificate that I would continue to be funded for for the extra year it would take, and their program has a strong emphasis in gaining teaching experience, which I think is important. I can also take a elective course to work on my Greek a little more before I would dive into graduate level reading courses, which I think I need. It's also a much cheaper place to live. There are some cons here though. I'm worried about living in the South (for obvious political reasons, but also because I don't handle heat very well), I've heard there's a lot of crime, and there isn't really anyone in the department that's working on exactly the kind of stuff I would be interested in. Also, it's a serious pain in the ass to get to and from there from basically everywhere. Overall, I think FSU has a strong program with great people and I would likely be quite happy there. However, if Boulder does come through with funding and it is enough to live on without getting another job... I don't know which one I should choose. Does anyone have any information about either program that might give me some insight into what I should do?
  7. Hey everyone, I'm hoping to get some insight or guidance from those of you who either are, or have been, in my position. I will attempt not to drone on endlessly with this, so please hang in there! I finished my BA in Classics in Chicago last year, and have just about (two more weeks) finished the Post-Bacc Program in Classics at UCLA (did well, feel confident in some strong letters of recommendation). I will be applying to PhD programs this fall. From the get-go, I always intended on applying solely to Classics programs, but the Post-Bacc Program has served me very well in tailoring my research interests to what very well may result in applying to programs outside of Classics. I am a Latinist, and at the mid-point of fluency in Italian. Many of my research interests involve applying modern theory to the ancient world. To be candid, I do not enjoy Greek at all, nor do I really have any interest in pursuing Classics as a whole (I think?). What I am thinking of doing is taking more Italian and Latin courses while sending in apps for fall 2018. To give a better example of what I'm interested in, I am currently doing research and writing on the reception of Plautine humor among Romans during a time of political turmoil, its relevance to Freudian theory on humor, and the use of comedic violence as catharsis while still acting as a tool for maintaining social boundaries. In a nutshell, this is almost like a history of humor. I want to study things such as the transition from the Latin-speaking world to the Italian-speaking world, the evolution of combat sports in Rome through their reception an development in modern times, etc. BASICALLY: I love the Latin language, the Italian language, sociological theory being applied to Roman contexts, and the development of the Roman world into Italy. So...please, if you have any suggestions, I would love to know what umbrella you think this falls under. As of right now, I'm thinking of applying to anthropology, sociology, and classics programs. I'm finding it hard to see where I would fit. Maybe even a history program? Maybe Italian programs?? What do you think? I'm also reaching out to members in several departments to hear their input, but I'd love to find out what everyone here thinks, seeing as you may have been in this predicament yourself. Thank you!!
  8. Hello, all! I'm still in the process of editing my writing sample, but the issue I'm trying to figure out is the writing style. The most recent paper I have is from an interdisciplinary foundations graduate course, but the professor required us to use APA. Should I keep it that way if I'm applying to a Classical Studies MA program? I've been trying to figure out if I should make it Chicago before putting it in with my application; the biggest issue I'm concerned about is that the writing sample is what the university uses to judge whether to offer the student funding or not. So, I want to make sure the formatting is done well in addition to the paper being written well. Since it also deals with disabilities studies in my paper, I suppose the APA might be okay, but I'm nervous about it. Any suggestions?
  9. $eptimius$everus

    Advice for Classics grad students!

    Not sure if anyone's seen the recent Eidolon article on advice for Classics grad students, but I figured this would be a good place to post it for those of us currently in/soon to be in grad school: https://eidolon.pub/dont-eat-the-cubed-cheese-and-other-advice-for-classics-graduate-students-aece0a14607#.ilbqbz17a What do you guys think of the advice? Any tips of your own to add?
  10. Hello, I am hunting around for a Master of Arts program in Classics / Classical Studies / Ancient History (preferably Classical Studies so I am getting both the language and culture courses in my MA), but my issue is that I would need to pursue the program online. I would prefer the school be based in the United States (non-profit, no for-profit schools) as I would need to get financial aid to attend, and there are little to no scholarships that I have found that would apply to a distance program learner, especially one that is for an American student attending a British school at a distance (if you know of one or more and want to share, it would be much appreciated). So far, the only school I have found that is a non-profit school in America that allows a Classical Studies Master's degree to be taken completely online is Villanova University in Pennsylvania. The downside of this is that the school is synchronous, and I currently live in Las Vegas, so arranging the time to be able to go to class would be doable but challenging. My second option is a distance program through a school in the United Kingdom, but those are my final option due to the lack of being able to do it right out of pocket. I also know of the Harvard Extension School, but as that requires residency and beginning the courses by paying out of your own pocket, I would not be able to pursue that path, either. The reason I want a Master of Arts in Classical Studies as an online program is because the local University doesn't have an option for Classical languages or archaeology or ancient history, but I cannot yet afford to move to a place that would offer such a program. The local university is also notorious for delaying graduation for their students by not offering the courses they need to graduate, so I wanted to avoid that as well. If anyone knows of any other non-profit schools, please let me know. I would need it to be without a residency requirement (the maximum I could be gone would be 2 weeks and I doubt I would be able to afford that, regardless) but would consider schools with short residences. I will be fine if Villanova is my only option, but I wanted to see if there were more schools I may have missed? I would prefer asynchronous coursework, but synchronous would be doable. Thank you all in advance!
  11. Hello, all! I was wondering if anyone would be willing to give me some feedback on my SoP for a terminal MA program in Classical Studies. It's due in February, so I have a bit of time to make corrections before I send it off. Thanks in advance!
  12. I'm having a bit of a dilemma with my pursuit of a second Master of Arts degree. Let me preface this by saying that while a second Master's degree may not seem like a good idea to some, since my first Master of Arts degree is in Museum Studies, the second degree would be complimentary to it in some way. My issue is that I need to attend my second Master of Arts degree as a distance learning/online program, as I do not have access to these programs at the local university and cannot afford to move at this moment and am working a full-time job now. Therefore, the dilemma I face is the following: do I apply to multiple graduate schools in the different fields I am considering as my second Master of Arts and attend the one that I feel is best suited to my goals, or should I focus solely on what I know will help the end goal the most? The issue is this: my local university does not have Classics, Classical archaeology, ancient history, or art history offered at the graduate level here, and those are the areas in which I desire to combine into an interdisciplinary PhD (such as the NYU ISAW or UPenn's AAMW program), but I am seeking out a terminal MA at the moment because I am not able to move yet. I have found that Villanova University offers their Classical Studies MA online but it's synchronous, so I would have to attend at the offered course time, which is doable but challenging. Thus far, that is the only university that I have found that offers a program that would be competitive enough to gain me entry into an eventual PhD. My question is: Should I apply to the Classical Studies by itself or should I apply to Villanova, but also for the second MA programs I am considering, such as Art History, History, Library Sciences (which would help as I work in a museum and often collaborate with the research library, so it would be relevant but not to my end goal of a PhD), and/or English/Creative Writing MFA - it's a hard call because I know it makes me look like I don't have one concentration or focus, but as I will have a Master's in Museum Studies soon, any of these degrees would pair well (I know many will tell me to take the MFA out, which I have considered anyway, since I could always pursue that later if I felt like it). The issue with the art history and history options, is, of course, not many online programs will allow you to focus on ancient history. I know that there are a decent schools in the UK that would be able to offer this (such as the University of Wales Trinity Saint David), but I cannot afford to pay that much out of pocket, so for now I am looking into American schools only. I think the root of my issue is worrying that I won't get into Villanova and then not know what to do with myself if I don't, since there's not that many other options. Help?
  13. hypsipyle

    Fall 2017 Applicants

    Hi all! No one had made this post yet (is the Classics corner of GradCafé slowly dying?!) so I figured I'd take the plunge. Who is applying for Classics and Classics-adjacent programs this cycle? What are your fields and interests? What are your hopes and dreams? (I am not applying myself and am happily ensconced in my own PhD program, but am happy to answer any questions about applications, interviews, or life as a PhD student)
  14. Apogeee

    Summer research

    What are you working on this summer? I'm finishing some odds and ends from the spring, and then I'm starting to do research on a renaissance author named Posselius. I have a few other unformed ideas. I should probably decide and stick with one at a time!
  15. Apogeee

    What did you decide?

    Is everyone all settled? What did you ultimately decide? Where are you going? Have you decided to wait until the next cycle? I am going to the University of Kentucky for something a little different than the standard Classics PhD.
  16. ClassApp

    Deferral?

    Hello! As we're all figuring out our plans for next year, I have a question that doesn't seem to have come up yet. What's the deal with deferrals? It seems that few graduate departments have their deferral policies listed on their website, and certainly no mention is made of it at visiting weekends so far. I know that our cohort sizes are quite small, so discouraging deferrals to an extent makes sense--but to what extent are they discouraged? What are acceptable reasons for deferring, if any? I haven't made my decision about graduate school yet, and I don't want to frighten any grad schools by asking about this and making them think I won't come next year (I do intend to attend grad school next year... but there is another great 1 year thing--originally a back up plan--that I'm waiting to hear about). Help?
  17. Ethersworn

    To Graduate Early or Not?

    Greetings, I am a 2nd semester sophomore (or junior, depending) majoring in Classics (Latin focus) and minoring in Linguistics at the South Carolina Honors College at USouthCarolina (ranked 34th in the country for Linguistics). (http://www.stat.tamu.edu/~jnewton/nrc_rankings/nrc41.html#area7) I have a 4.0 and have finished the classes I didn't have desire to study for (lab sciences, math, &c.) leaving me with only languages and linguistics courses to take. For personal reasons, I have a strong desire to graduate a year early as it would open up a fantastic possibility in my personal life but I do not want to hurt my future career. By the end of spring semester next year, I will have taken 3 years of Latin and the equivalent of 2 years of Greek, 2 years of German, at least 1 year of Old English and 1 year of Old Norse. I want to eventually get a Phd in Historical Linguistics from somewhere nice (Cornell, UPenn, Harvard, Minnesota, &c.), regardless of whether I get a prefatory Masters degree. Theoretically, if I stayed for a full 4 years I would graduate with a Classics major and Linguistics and German double minor, while 3 years would leave me with a German cognate instead . I will have written a senior thesis (ideally doing some comparative linguistics with my familiar languages) and possibly have presented at a conference by this point next year. My ultimate question is, if I go ahead and graduate early, will I be a highly competitive candidate for these sorts of MA programs or would I be shooting myself in the foot by pushing forward for person reasons?
  18. Im about to graduate with a Latin degree and it was advised that I look into a post baccalaureate program to begin my graduate studies. Ive not been expecting to find many but the list I have come up with is even shorter than I had anticipated and I just wanted to make sure that I know as much as possible before I begin to think about making a selection. Here are the Programs Ive been able to find -Georgetown -UNC Chapel Hill -UC Davis -UCLA -UPenn -Columbia University -Loyola University If anyone knows of any Ive missed I would greatly appreciate the name, maybe a link?
  19. Greetings, I am currently a Classical Languages undergraduate student at USouth Carolina. Upon graduation I will have roughly 4 years of Latin, 3 years of German, 2 years of Greek, 2 years of Old English, and 1 year of Old Norse. I will also have some various Medieval era courses. I want to attend a top Medieval Studies graduate program but am worried that having an undergrad degree in Classics rather than Medieval Studies (which my school doesn't have) may set me back. My sophomore undergraduate research is on Proto Indo European\, but my Senior thesis will obviously be on a medieval topic. Can anyone shed light on whether this will be of detriment to my acceptance chances? Thanks,
  20. Ethersworn

    Classics to Medieval Studies?

    Greetings, I am currently a Classical Languages undergraduate student at USouth Carolina. Upon graduation I will have roughly 4 years of Latin, 3 years of German, 2 years of Greek, 2 years of Old English, and 1 year of Old Norse. I will also have some various Medieval era courses. I want to attend a top Medieval Studies graduate program but am worried that having an undergrad degree in Classics rather than Medieval Studies (which my school doesn't have) may set me back. My sophomore undergraduate research is on Proto Indo European\, but my Senior thesis will obviously be on a medieval topic. Can anyone shed light on whether this will be of detriment to my acceptance chances? Thanks,
  21. Does anything know any good sites or university websites that post their admissions profiles for classics programs? I'm trying to find the statistics for number of applicants and number of admissions.
  22. Tollelege

    M.A. or Ph.D. after M.Div.?

    Dear Gradcafe Community, This is my first post as a newly registered member of gradcafe. I have followed several threads here and found helpful advice, so I thought I would try my own question. I am going into the final year of my M.Div. program, hoping to continue on to a Ph.D. in patristics. But I have a dilemma. I am not sure whether I would be a very viable candidate for a top-tier Ph.D. program and am wondering what to do. I say this for a couple reasons. First, my languages need some work. I have about four years of Greek between undergrad and divinity school, but it is almost exclusively in Koine. I will have one year of Latin, but will need to work on that. And, I have yet to learn French or German. Furthermore, I have almost no background in classical studies/ancient philosophy (excepting my own independent study). And finally, both of my degrees are from evangelical institutions. On the upside, I have extensive coursework in the history of Christian thought and have taken several graduate seminars on patristic figures in particular. I also have strong LOR's from profs with good connections to some of the schools I am applying to. With all of this in mind, should I go ahead and apply for competitive Ph.D. programs in early Christian history/theology or should I take a couple years to do a funded M.A. that will allow me to work on my languages and fill the lacuna of classical studies/philosophy background? Furthermore, if I do apply to doctoral programs and am rejected, will this negatively affect my chances if I apply after having completed an M.A. to the same programs? I apologize for the length of this, but wanted you to have the specifics. To make this already lengthy question even more tedious, here are my stats: B.A. from Christian liberal arts college (3.94 GPA) M.Div. from evangelical divinity school (3.97 GPA) GRE: 730V/760Q 5.0 Greek (NT) 4 years Biblical Hebrew 2 years Latin 1 year Spanish 2 years
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