Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'debt'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Comment Card
    • Announcements
    • Comments, Questions, Etc.
  • The Cafe
    • City Guide
    • IHOG: International House of Grads
    • The Lobby
  • Applying to Graduate School
    • The April 15th is this week! Freak-out forum.
    • Applications
    • Questions and Answers
    • Waiting it Out
    • Decisions, Decisions
    • The Bank
  • Grad School Life
    • Meet and Greet
    • Officially Grads
    • Coursework, Advising, and Exams
    • Research
    • Teaching
    • Writing, Presenting and Publishing
    • Jobs
  • The Menu
    • Applied Sciences & Mathematics
    • Arts
    • Humanities
    • Interdisciplinary Studies
    • Life Sciences
    • Physical Sciences
    • Professional Programs
    • Social Sciences

Blogs

  • An Optimist's PhD Blog
  • coyabean's Blog
  • Saved for a Rainy Day
  • To infinity and beyond
  • captiv8ed's Blog
  • Pea-Jay's Educational Journey
  • Procrastinating
  • alexis' Blog
  • grassroots and bamboo shoots.
  • Ridgey's blog
  • ScreamingHairyArmadillo's Blog
  • amyeray's Blog
  • Blemo Girl's Guide to Grad School
  • Psychdork's Blog
  • missesENG's Blog
  • bgk's Blog
  • Tall Chai Latte's blog
  • PhD is for Chumps
  • bloggin'
  • NY or KY
  • Deadlines Blog Ferment
  • Going All In
  • In Itinere ad Eruditus
  • Adventures in Grad School-ing
  • inafuturelife
  • The Alchemist's Path
  • The Rocking Blog
  • And Here We Go!
  • Presbygeek's Blog
  • zennin' it
  • Magical Mystery Tour
  • A Beggar's Blog
  • A Senseless Game
  • Jumping into the Fray
  • Asian Studies Masters
  • Around the Block Again
  • A complicated affair
  • Click My Heels Three Times and Get In
  • dimanche0829's Blog
  • Computer Science Crossed Fingers
  • To the Lighthouse
  • Blog of Abnormally Aberrant
  • MissMoneyJenny's Blog
  • Two Masters, an Archive and Tea
  • 20/20 Hindsight
  • Right Now I'm A-Roaming
  • A Future Historian's Journey to PhD
  • St Andrews Lynx's Blog
  • Amerz's Blog
  • Musings of a Biotech Babe
  • TheFez's Blog
  • PhD, Please!
  • Blooming Ecologist
  • Brittle Ductile Transitions
  • Pleiotropic Notions
  • EdTech Enthusiast
  • The Many Flavors of Rhetoric
  • Expanding Horizons
  • Yes, and...
  • Flailing Upward
  • Traumatized, Exhausted, and Still Going
  • Straight Outta Undergrad!
  • A Hitchhikers Guide to Transferring PhD Programs
  • Conquering College Admissions
  • Reflections of an Older Student.

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Pronouns


Location


Interests


Program

Found 20 results

  1. My apologies if this has already been addressed in another thread here. I'm interested in creative ways to help reduce student loan debt. I ended up taking about $20K to $25K more in loans than I expected due to several factors, a) the university dramatically increased student housing costs from the time of my admission to the time of my defense (up 48% in four years); b.) my family's health needs during my studies prevented me from taking a substantial part time job; and c.) there was no real economy where I attended anyway (e.g., only entry-level minimum wage jobs). Now, I'm looking at my own student debt and my wife's from her education and trying to figure out how to raise a family and pay off my loans on a single "humanities" income.
  2. Long story short, I just calculated the amount I would have to take out in loans for tuition alone assuming a small scholarship and it's over 30k. Add loans for living expenses to that, even assuming I'm incredibly frugal and my partner is helping to support me, and I feel like I'm looking at 50k in debt for this degree. Feeling really down especially seeing as I already have over 40k in debt from my useless undergrad. This is what I want to do with my life and I don't want to get discouraged, but damn. I thought I was being smart by waiting a year and trying to get in-state tuition, but $50,000 is no joke. Is anyone else out there struggling with the price tag before even being admitted?
  3. Hi hello it's me, creator of a million and one threads, haha. Sorry to post again but I really need some advice. I was accepted to Pitt yesterday (yay!!) and I really want to go. However, I'm worried about the amount of debt I will have to take on in addition to the debt I already have from undergrad. This is my second cycle applying, and I have a strong desire to start grad school this year. I feel like I'm ready and I don't see the point of waiting any longer (it's already been almost four years since I graduated from undergrad). However, I can't stop comparing the tuition at Pitt (22k) with the tuition at the top-ranked program in my (former) home state (12k) and feeling upset by it. I feel like I should have applied to the program in my home state before and essentially the only reason I didn't is because my partner refused to consider living in that city. I was fine with this at the time because I really wanted to move out of the state, but now I feel like maybe we made a mistake by moving here. Additionally, there is a small possibility that my partner may soon have a job opportunity in or around our former town, which is a reasonable distance from the city in which the other MSW program is located. A lot of people commute between the two, and I would consider this as well if the opportunity presented itself. I guess my question is... am I being an idiot by not considering the much more affordable (lower-ranked but still respected) program? The big issue is that I would have to wait another year to apply. The deadline is too soon to ask my recommenders to write me another letter and if I applied now I wouldn't qualify for in-state tuition, which would sort of defeat the purpose. There are definitely pros and cons to both - I don't love the city of Pittsburgh, and I miss aspects of my hometown, such as the natural beauty of the area and being close to family. However, decent jobs are pretty hard to come by in that area and it would be so embarrassing to move back after all this. I also don't want to wait an additional year to start grad school, and I don't want to put myself and my recommenders through through the process of applying for the third year in a row! There's also no guarantee that I would get in, and if I didn't I'd be in a much worse position than I am now. But the tuition... I'm so conflicted! Please help!
  4. So, Fletcher School at Tufts University has been my dream school for some time now. I got admitted into MALD and want to specialise in Development Economics but also take a few classes in Social Entreprenurship and International Political Economy. The flexibility of the MALD degree allows me to do that. I am particularly drawn to the cross registration option with Harvard and would love to take Social Entrepreneurship classes at Harvard Business School and also build some contacts. My problem is funding. I have received funding of $24k for two years (12k per year) from Fletcher. Still, the tuition plus living cost comes up to $117k. My relative is lending $67,000 and I have to take a loan of $ 50,000. I come from a middle class family in India. After the MALD degree, I am eligible for 1 year OPT in USA as an international student but after that it is the dreaded H1B lottery and purely depends on chance. I cannot pay off such a high debt earning in my local currency. I also have an offer from Austalian National University (ANU) in Canberra, ranked among top 25 universities in the world by QS rankings, for a Master in International and Development Economics. While not terribly cheap, the total cost is $ 40k less than Fletcher. Australia also allows international students guaranteed stay for 2 years after the degree and it is easy to stay on afterwards till debt is paid off. I have applied for a few full and partial scholarships for ANU but the results have not yet been declared. However, Fletcher has always been my “dream school” and I wasn’t so happy as I am now for a long time until I got the Fletcher offer letter. My head says ANU but my heart says Fletcher. I like that I can take a few IPE and Social Entrepreneurship classes along with Development Economics at Fletcher as opposed to pure Development Economics at ANU. However, the ANU degree is highly quantitative, comparable to MPA/ID level of Econ and Maths at Harvard, and I have heard that such a degree has better scope at IFIs and development consulting, and better prospects than an IR degree with specialisation in Development. I have the following doubts: 1) Is Fletcher School worth a debt of $ 50k plus interest and then repayment of $ 67k to my relative? The chances of further scholarship at Fletcher seem slim. 2) Is the name Master of Arts in Law and Diplomacy (MALD) misleading to employers in the development sector outside USA? I ask this because Fletcher does not mention specialisation pursued on its transcripts. 3) To former and current Fletcher students: I know the cross registration option with Harvard exists on paper but how easy is it to actually take classes at Harvard Business School or Harvard Kennedy School and form some useful contacts? Is it worth going to Fletcher for this reason? 4) Is it better to go to Fletcher or ANU? I want to work in development consulting or an IFI but some part of me also wants start a Social Entreprise in future and I cannot help but think the broader education in USA will help me in this. The ANU curriculum goes very deep into a narrow subject area while the Fletcher curriculum seems to go superficialy across a range of disciplines. At least, that is my impression. Note: Harvard Kennedy School and SAIS are beyond my budget without fellowships so I did not apply. @Kaneisha and @ExponentialDecay would highly appreciate your inputs. Thanks!
  5. Hi everyone, One of the scariest things many of us who aspire to be SLPs are facing is the cost of education. This is a very sensitive topic for many people, including myself. I was not very smart about student loans as an undergrad, and am very worried about the amount I will rack up if and when I am accepted into a graduate program. I graduated with over $100k in student loan debt and am wondering if going to graduate school and tackling a possible $200k loan (due to interest) by the end of the program is worth it. Salary was never a huge thing for me going into CSD. It was never the reason I wanted to become an SLP to begin with. I have always had a passion for working with children, especially those with disabilities. I hope to work as an SLP in a school-based setting one day. Everyone knows how passionate I am about the field. Unfortunately, I am constantly reminded of the huge loans that will be weighing down on me if and when I graduate from school. Based on research (which may vary based on setting, location, and years of experience), SLPs do not make much in their CFY and in their first few years in the field. However, loan payments will be required during that time. For reference, I graduated a year ago and am currently working at a therapeutic day school as an assistant teacher. I work very closely with the SLPs, so I am also getting a lot of hands-on experience. Financially, I have been making all of my loan payments on-time. I currently live at home, which is fine. Therefore, I am able to live comfortably and can afford to splurge every now and then while also saving money. I was planning on applying for programs this upcoming season, but I can't help wonder if now would be the right time for me to do so. I am a follower of Dave Ramsey, so my budgeting skills have definitely improved. I am also worried since many programs advise you not to work at all or to work for little with highly flexible hours, which means interest would accrue during that time. Should I wait and pay off some loans first before applying to grad school, or should I be willing to tackle these loans all at once afterwards? I am not sure if anyone else out there is in the same financial situation as me. If this resonates with you, know that you are not alone. Any and all advice is greatly appreciated!
  6. Hey everyone, I am about to join a PhD program in US this fall. I recently came across an Article about debt during PhD. The article mentions that the average grad school debt for Social Science PhD holders is $24,581, but it doesn't mention how students go into debt. My field is Social Sciences. Although I have been offered a tuition waiver and stipend for 5 years. Should I be concerned?
  7. Hello all. I need a bit of help deciding between Mills College and Wake Forest for their English MA programs. I've spoken with both schools and will be visiting shortly. They both assure me that they place students very well into top doctoral programs and - at least for Mills - into positions outside of universities (publishing, journalism, private high schools, community colleges, and so on). But neither program seems to have or to want to cough up hard data regarding their past placements. Is this something to be concerned about? Or maybe, more pertinently, does anyone have insight into the standing and success rates of these two schools?
  8. ????????

    CIR Chicago

    Hello all, I was accepted to the CIR program at Chicago (very excited and surprised) with 38k in funding. Yet this still means I need to shell out a lot of money for a masters. I plan to follow through with a phd program. I'm very interested in improving my language skills and doing a research assistantship. Are these goals feasible in a single year in such a rigorous program? Is 19,000 dollars in debt a deathtrap for a masters? Is this an normal amount of funding? I'm basically right out of undergraduate with a little research experience and time abroad (+bad quant GRE). I'm not willing to wait for another application round. Any advice?
  9. Hey, everyone I was recently admitted to Simmons and Smith MSW programs, but both were entirely too expensive (around 80k in debt, taking into account both scholarships and grants). I've been pretty bummed about it and now I'm worried I won't be able to pull off going to grad school in the fall, even despite getting accepted. I have also been admitted to BC and Loyola, but haven't heard back about funding for either. I'm hopeful, but still skeptical. I have read a few threads asking how much debt is too much, etc. and it seems that the general consensus is that it's a personal preference. This has made me curious. How much are you, personally, okay with going into debt for a MSW? What is your thought process to come to that conclusion? What are the ways that you expect going into that debt will be worth it in the long run? I still realize that this will end up being a personal preference, but I think it is a worthwhile conversation. I hope somebody can bring some points to light that I hadn't previously thought of.
  10. Hello all, I'm going to add to the chaos this decision-making season. I have been accepted to the strategic studies program at SAIS DC with no funding, GWs Security Policy Studies Program with 7k a year, and Korbel's International Security program with 20k a year. I already live in Denver, and I know that Security is one of Korbel's top programs. But, will I be at a disadvantage if I am not in DC? I know Korbel offers the Global Security Program in DC for second year students, but it is highly competitive. Also, GW allows for two concentrations, the second of which for me would be development. I know a lot of people will say follow the money, but it's hard to turn down an opportunity like SAIS or Elliott. Also, has anyone tried appealing for more funding to any of these schools? I know it's unlikely with SAIS, but if Elliott and Korbel were aware of my acceptance to SAIS, is there even the slightest chance of receiving more funding? I've heard there's no harm in asking, but I would like some advice. Congrats to all who got in and good luck!
  11. Hi all, I spent two years researching and visiting programs in order to find the right MFA, and I got into my top choice and I’m super excited to start this fall! I applied to five programs and was accepted, and offered a teaching position and full tuition remission, at three. I picked up some helpful advice along the way and I thought I’d share. My disclaimers are, 1. Obviously this is my opinion, and others might feel differently. 2. I’m enrolled though I don’t actually start school until September. My perspective on my choice could very well change after a year of grad school! Here's my advice: Visit the school I scored big points with future advisors by visiting schools the year before I planned to apply. (ie. visited in 2014, applied in 2015) They remembered my name when calling back for interviews, and knew I was serious about their program. I also saw a highly ranked program that was a complete shit show in person, and was grateful I didn’t waste my time applying there. Look for advisors, not highly ranked programs Your advisor will have a huge impact on your experience during school and after. Whether the program is highly ranked according to US News and World Report will have much less bearing on your success. Those rankings are notoriously inaccurate and meaningless anyways. Find an advisor you don’t mind having dinner with, and who seems like they have enough interest in your work to give you the time of day once you’re a student. Recommendations matter more than essays I asked a potential advisor during a visit how much the essays mattered, and his response was, “We don’t read as much as we should”. Yikes. I still worked super hard on my essays, but per his advice, worked harder to get recommendations from important names in his field. He also said that the name/reputation of the recommender matters more than how glowing their opinion of you might be. (ie. Big name > person who knows you super well) **Note!** You’re going to need to send your recommenders near-final drafts of your essay and portfolio in order to get a good letter, and then to give them at least a month to write your letters. So start your applications a few months before the due date for best results. Play to your strengths I had this wacky idea that I had done enough printmaking in undergrad, and should pursue a grad degree in one of my other areas of interest. I started emailing professors of sculpture about their programs and kept having my emails forwarded to the print professors. Finally I was given the advice that you can explore all you want once you get in (if you choose a program without rigid departmental divisions) but you need to put your best foot forward to get in at all. IMHO, Don’t Pay for an MFA I've heard this from several artists with MFAs, though I also know lots of fantastic artists who did take out large loans to get their degree and felt it was worth it. For me, in an uncertain job market, I find debt to be too large of a liability to be worth a degree that brings no guarantee of employability. There are funded MFAs out there – the trick is to look for universities that keep programs small enough to give each grad student a teaching job. There are also scholarships at private schools (Stanford!). Don’t obsess over this forum I visited grad café a few times during my search and definitely got some helpful stuff here. The level of anxiety on the forum in general though was… unhelpful to say the least. I referenced it during the early stages of choosing schools and then intentionally stayed away from the wanton freaking out. I hope this was helpful! Good luck!!
  12. About how much student debt do you have and how do you plan to repay it? I'm at over 40K right now and my loans are due for a payment soon since I graduated some time ago now. I seriously can't afford these payments with all the other things I pay for. I feel like I'm stuck and I definitely don't want any lack of future payments since that would hurt my credit score. Anyone dealing with this and found some sort of solution or a way to help?
  13. Hi All, I find myself paralyzed by the prospect of selecting a graduate program before even applying to a single program! Crazy, I know! Nevertheless, I'd greatly appreciate strategies, wisdom, or anecdotes from anyone who has considered planning for a masters and a doctorate. Thank you so much! Some context -- For the last couple years, I have planned to go for a MPH in environmental health, followed immediately by a PhD in medical anthropology. I decided on that order, hoping the MPH would buy my some time to explore other PhD tracks, and give me a stronger skillset and more refined research interests to bring to a PhD program. Haven't questioned that plan until now. I was just happy to have a plan. However, now that SOPHAS has opened up for MPH programs beginning in 2017, I am getting cold feet! I am questioning the "traditional" order I planned to pursue these degrees (i.e. MPH, then PhD) and struggle to prioritize the factors that are most important to me in either program: affordability (the specter that haunts us all), program quality (judged by the school's national rank + research productivity), and ability to specialize in my area of interest (judged by curriculum variety/flexibility + faculty's areas of research) I am confident that I can get into attractive, "top-ranked" MPH programs. However, I know rank isn't everything and that there are "smarter" (read "less expensive" and "quicker") ways to go about earning the degrees I want, even if that means choosing a less attractive MPH program. For example, perhaps applying to a MPH/PhD dual-degree program will make it easier to fund my MPH. I've read other forums on this site that recommended starting a PhD, earning candidacy, leaving to do the MPH, then returning to the PhD. Maybe I should go part-time for my masters and work for a few more years before going back for a doctorate--who knows! I tend to overthink large decisions and would be ready to admit that's at play here, but I am confident there are plenty of ways to pursue my goals with merits of their own that I have not considered before. I will say that mentors who know my interests have encouraged my to earn both degrees as soon as possible, and that feels right to me. So in the hopes of gaining more opinions--here we are! Thanks again, K.
  14. As you can see in my sig, I'm applying to a lot of schools. I'm in Virginia so only 3 of them are in-state (4 if you count the fact that D.C. schools do 'american student vs international student' instead of 'in-state vs out-of-state/international'). On another forum someone reminded me of the old adage of "don't take out more loans than your first year's salary". If the stats I found online are right, the median salary for SLPs is about $58k. Probably a little less for first-year employees. By that logic, and provided these stats were right, I could only afford *one* in-state school, and that's if I only paid tuition, not housing or books or course fees or food or gasoline or anything else. How much debt would be "appropriate" for an SLP to take on? Is going out of state even worth it in the long run if it ends with me having $90,000+ in debt? (Full disclosure: my parents are generously going to help me pay for school but I'm treating it as if they are not to both keep myself grounded and to make this question more relatable to everyone)
  15. Hi, I will be starting 2nd year of MPA at Columbia SIPA. I'm an international student. Though I have a partial scholarship from SIPA and taken a loan for my studies, the living and course have been so expensive that I'll run out of money to finance my last semester. I have already reached out to Prodigy Finance and MPOWER for additional loan, but they have declined my application. Since I'm an international student and have no one in the US who could be a cosigner for US bank loan, that is not an option. Plus, my family can't support my studies since it's not affordable. Are there any other options I could look at? Urgent help needed here, please. Thanks in advance.
  16. Not sure if this has been discussed before, but does anyone have any experience or know of people that are doing the public service loan forgiveness program? I assume a lot of people on this forum are looking to enter government service after they graduate, so wanted to know if anyone was considering taking on the extra debt with the intention of applying for this program? I know that you have to make 120 monthly payments, which would commit you to 10 years in that career field, which is a long time. Let me know your thoughts!
  17. Okay, so I was browsing the net and found this : http://www.apa.org/gradpsych/2013/01/debt.aspx You can go through the article but the statistics shocked me. " APA's latest survey of doctoral graduates, completed in 2011, revealed that more than two-thirds of all students took out loans during their education, with the median amount of debt ranging from $30,000 for psychology research PhDs to $80,000 for students in health service professions. PsyD students graduate with a median debt of $120,000." I know it's 2011 figures but I find this ridiculous. Not one psychologist I know starting out earns the buckets of money that is needed to repay these loans off quickly and efficiently. Some corporate law and med students are in similar situations but their salaries are way higher after graduation than psychologists. It made me doubt whether I am willing to take up such a huge financial burden. What is your opinion on the debt accumulated by PhD Psych students? Any experiences to share?
  18. First post! Pianist here. Going for the MM. I have no money so financial aid is a big deal. I've been admitted to Michigan, NYU, Boston Conservatory, and Georgia. Waiting on Mannes (no decision yet) and CCM (waitlist). I got rejected to seven other places, but that's neither here nor there. Georgia is offering a full ride with an assistantship and a stipend. NYU is offering an assistantship only, which does not cover living expenses (in NYC!!) Michigan is offering a big fat $0. But they are asking for the details of my other offers, because "funds may become available." I don't know what to think of this. BoCo hasn't gotten back to me with financial info yet. Hopefully some of you have been in similar situations, and can answer my question: is it worth it to go into debt for NYU or Michigan? Is it wise to go to Georgia for purely financial reasons, when I have been admitted to marginally ritzier places? Has anyone else had to make the decision between a funded safety school and an unfunded dream school? With the experience you have now, what would you choose if you could make your decision again? Help!
  19. I've seen this issue come up on a few different threads, so I thought I'd give my two cents. I am currently concerned about how I will pay for my MSW. I have long known that this is an expensive proposition. As such, I have set a personal cap of the amount of loans I am taking out to fund this venture. I have done research on income based repayment and loan forgiveness. I LOVE Heather Jarvis, the person I liked to, as a student loan resource. Thing is, I really don't want to either pay off loan for a really long time, nor gamble on the decisions of lawmakers to fund my higher education. I have applied for assistantships, I am looking at residence life jobs, but my final decision will probably be financially driven.
  20. Hello Everyone, I am in a bit of a quandery, and I was hoping that their might be someone on this forum who can offer me some advice. I was accepted into Florida International University's history Ph.D. program last month and was nominated for funding - I won't find out the results until sometime in April, and only after I accept their offer of admittance. There were the only program to admit me this cycle (1st time applying for doctoral programs). However, I am currently on the fence as to whether or not I should accept the offer and attend (if I receive funding), or return to my home in southwest Michigan and get a job (either full-time or part-time) to pay down part of my student loan debt. I currently have about 75k to 85k in debts, the majority paying for my M.A. degree. I figure that I would work for 2-5 years, reapplying every so often, and then continue on course for a history Ph.D. Can anyone offer some advice about this? Personal experiences, or similar situations? P.S. I am hoping to work in academia after completing the Ph.D. by the way.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.