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Found 18 results

  1. I am looking to apply for English PhD programs in the New England area (or around there) which are fully funded with professors studying 19th century British literature and feminist/gender theory. However, I am worried about my chances of getting into a fully funded program because I didn't go to a prestigious undergrad or master's program. What kind of students apply to these programs? Does someone with this kind of background even stand a chance? University of Arizona BA in Creative Writing & Anthropology (Double Major) - 3.74 University of Southern Maine Stonecoast Creative Writing MFA - Pass (out of pass/fail) 4 academic paper presentations at conferences Study abroad for 6 months Work abroad (TEFL) for 6 months Master's academic work focuses on studying fairy tales and modern fantasy literature PhD prospective project to focus on the representation of women in 19th century fantastical literature Writing sample in relation is from a paper presented at the International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts and WorldCon Science Fiction Convention From what I've seen about the job market, you have to attend a prestigious university to have career prospects as a professor. I want to be a tenured professor studying and teaching and writing in this field more than anything in the world. Would just like to know whether that is a longshot.
  2. I am looking to apply for English PhD programs in the New England area (or around there) which are fully funded with professors studying 19th century British literature and feminist/gender theory. However, I am worried about my chances of getting into a fully funded program because I didn't go to a prestigious undergrad or master's program. Is there any hope for someone with this kind of background? University of Arizona BA in Creative Writing & Anthropology (Double Major) - 3.74 University of Southern Maine Stonecoast Creative Writing MFA - Pass (out of pass/fail) 4 academic paper presentations at conferences Study abroad for 6 months Work abroad (TEFL) for 6 months Master's academic work focuses on studying fairy tales and modern fantasy literature PhD prospective project to focus on the representation of women in 19th century fantastical literature Writing sample in relation is from a paper presented at the International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts and WorldCon Science Fiction Convention From what I've seen about the job market, you have to attend a prestigious university to have career prospects as a professor. I want to be a tenured professor studying and teaching and writing in this field more than anything in the world. Would just like to know whether that is a longshot.
  3. Hey everyone, long time lurker here. First of all, congratulations to everyone who got into a program and also for surviving this application cycle! Even if this cycle didn't work out, be positively sure it had everything to do with how difficult this year was and that if you have the resources, you can always apply again. This was my second cycle after a terrible first one (complete shutout). I am an international first generation grad student from India. I guess you can imagine how difficult it must have been to navigate through the entire US academic system, prepare materials I've never prepared before, and to reach out to people in different timezones and from different cultural backgrounds. That too in the middle of a pandemic. I lacked the cultural capital and the financial resources (it was stressful paying the application fees in dollars). I guess I persevered, and unlike the first cycle, I reached out to people for help, and now I have two PhD offers - University of Florida and University of Kansas. Since I'm not familiar with the system nor have I ever set foot in the US, I would really appreciate if you could help me make the decision. I'll just list some of the salient points about the two programs and would love your opinion. PhD English at UF: 1. Stipend of 17k with an additional 2k dollars (Rawlings fellowship) for FOUR years. I will be entering the program as an MA student (I have an MPhil degree) so I need to complete 7 courses (instead of 12). Even then, isn't four years too less? I want to stay in academia and would like to publish and present papers. Will I have the time for that? The grad coordinator has assured me that there are provisions for extension but I am still anxious. 2. Teach 1 course per semester, build and structure the course design. Written in the letter, "For each 3 hours of class contact, you are required to hold regular office hours (two hours weekly)." 3. I think Gainesville is relatively more expensive than Lawrence? 4. Guaranteed summer teaching jobs for international students. 5. Active student union (yes!) 6. Extremely welcoming faculty and supportive senior grad students. Grad coordinator spoke with me over Zoom and soon after faculty members reached out to me individually. Now, about KU PhD English: 1. 5 years (10 semesters) stipend of $17,750. Can be extended to the sixth year if needed. I guess this is the standard timeline in the US? 2. I have to teach 2 courses each sem. Exact wording in the letter: "Your appointment as a GTA in English requires that you prepare, teach, and grade assignments for two 3-hour courses in the fall semester and two 3-hour courses in the spring semester in accordance with Departmental guidelines, hold student office hours at designated times, maintain grade and other records, and attend professional development meetings as required." That is A LOT of teaching load, right? 3. Cheaper than Gainesville. (I think?) 4. No guaranteed summer jobs. 5. Not sure about student unions but recent news suggest that KU administration is f-ing up a lot. 6. The graduate director was very supportive. Not sure about the other faculty members though. Fit wise, I think UF works out better. It's just that I'm really, really apprehensive about just 4 years of funding. I'm sure there are enough provisions for extensions (grad coordinator has assured me) but still. I would love your opinions on this. Also, is there something else that I should be looking into (especially as an international student)? I'm sorry for this EXTREMELY long post, btw! Have a great day everyone!
  4. If anyone here has applied to Penn State for their Ph.D. in English program and you know about this, please clarify for me. I would really appreciate it. Thanks! So on the English department's website, it says that a SOP (1-3 double-spaced pages) is required. However, when I went to start the application, the portal says that part of the documentation required is a personal statement with the following prompt: "Why do you want to pursue a higher degree in English studies at a time when the Liberal Arts are often less valued than science and technology?" This doesn't sound like a SOP prompt either way, so I'm just confused. Do they want this in addition to the SOP? Also, it says that a CV is required when the website does not ask for one. I have already written my SOP, so it would really suck if I had to rewrite it based on this prompt or add a personal statement when it didn't even ask for one in the first place.
  5. I have a pretty difficult decision in front of me. I got accepted to a few English MA programs (one of them is a super-ideal program) and one MFA program in creative writing, and I'm not sure about which path to follow. I really, really want to attend an MFA. I see creative writing as a life-long pursuit, and I think getting an MFA right now would be a great step in that pursuit. The "problem" (I realize how lucky I am to have this problem) is that I'm unsure about this particular MFA program. It's only a few years old, not as well known or renowned as other places, and is taught by a few writers who, although have published a lot, I'm not particularly enthusiastic about working with. The kind of writing they do is very different from my own. If you're wondering why I applied to this programs, I wanted to widen my net as much as possible and include a variety of higher and lower ranked programs. There are things, however, that I like about the MFA program--it's fully funded, will give me teaching experience, and allows its students to work in editing and publishing through a magazine internship, all of which I really value. The English MA program, on the other hand, is an ideal fit for me. The program is home to a number of faculty members doing work in my area of specialization, they have great PhD placement rates, and they provide twice as much funding with a lower teaching load. Dilemma in short--Although I prioritize the MFA over the MA, I've gotten into my least ideal MFA program and most ideal MA program, and I don't know which way to go. Other important info... My vocational goals are to teach literature at the university or community college level, and I plan on applying to PhD programs after completing either my MA or MFA. I don't really care about where I live. Funding is important to me (grad school seems stressful enough without money issues). Do you think it's right for me to assume that an MA will give me a better chance to get into prestigious PhD programs than an MFA, especially an MFA that is lower ranked or not as known? I understand it's impossible for anyone, especially a stranger, to really know what's best for my future, but any thoughts, opinions, or stories of similar situations and how they worked out for you would be very much appreciated. Let me know if you'd like more context. Thank you.
  6. Hey! (To the current students and others) Based on your experiences, how would advise someone to use their time before graduate school? As in, how can we prepare ourselves better for what lies ahead? Some essential reading or something? Thanks!
  7. Hello Grad Cafe peeps! I'm interested in a very specific English M.A. or PhD program with an emphasis (or expertise) in graphic novel creation (or with image and textual analysis together). Does something like this exist in the U.S.? I haven't found anything in my research, but I'd love to know if any of you have come across programs like these.
  8. Hi! Very recent college graduate here currently applying to English Masters and/or PhD programs for Fall 2020 (originally planned on applying last fall, but my courseload and general lack of money made it a little difficult, so I waited a year). I have my B.A. in English, minor in Writing, overall GPA of 3.588 (GPA in major is about the same, I'll have to check, but it's at least 3.5), was in top % of seniors of my major, graduated Cum Laude, plenty of extracurriculars/honor societies/etc. My (December 2018) GRE score for verbal was 159, which isn't too hot, but I was in the higher end of the 80th percentile. I also have two rec letters basically ready to go and the third in the works. All of which I'm very sure will be positive/enthusiastic, haha. I'm also currently working on spiffing up my writing sample and drafting my personal statement(s). My general preferred area of study is 18th/19th century British Literature; particularly, I'm interested in Romantic and Victorian literature; even more particularly, a lot of my undergraduate work focused on queerness and womanhood within those eras of literature, especially in the Gothic, but that's not necessarily a big "must" for me for grad programs to offer resources in. I would really, really appreciate any suggestions for English MA or PhD programs that both a) are a good fit for my interests and b) I could reasonably be seriously considered for! I have a few programs in mind already and have been working on my applications, but I'm basically just worried about selling myself too short or severely overestimating my chances of getting in somewhere and wasting my time. Thanks in advance!!!
  9. Greetings GradCafe Community, So, I am interested in applying in the future for an English PhD Program. I was told that when looking for a specific program, I have to look for faculty who have the same interests as I do (go figure!) However, I have only found two faculty members (U of Texas Austin and U of Washington) who have similar interests as I do. I am interested in Queer and Ethnically diverse Young Adult Fiction, and would like to specialize in this area, but its been hard to find other faculty in other schools who work with these kinds of texts. Any suggestions on how to improve my search fo a professor who works with YA Fiction? Secondly, on a sidenote, I have also been told by a professor that I should specialize in British or American, and have YA Fiction as something I have of interest to increase my odds of landing a good academic job (yes, I know how had it is to land tenure.); should I be looking for contemporary American (given that that is where YA fiction would land in) professors when looking for potentials mentors? Any suggestions would help! Thanks!
  10. Have these universities started sending application offers for English PhD? New York University University of California Berkeley University of Texas Austin Washington University in St. Louis University of Michigan Ann Arbor University of Chicago Northwestern University Louisiana State University Yale University
  11. Hi, all – I apologize in advance if any of my questions are glaringly obvious, but I require gradcafe wisdom on submitting a multimedia essay to PhD programs in English literature and similar disciplines like cultural/media studies. As a point of reference, my essay examines the ideological edifice of two Steve Bannon documentaries, Torchbearer and Generation Zero, and draws on the theoretical framework of S. Žižek's The Sublime Object of Ideology. Such analysis requires that I embed clips from either film as textual evidence, and the platform I decided upon was WordPress, buying my own domain to give a little autonomy to the project. To start, how do different PhD programs deal with this type of submission? I'm sure disciplines like media studies have pretty clear-cut protocol for what I'm describing, but I'm not sure how English literature programs might differ, if at all, but they're my main point of interest here, so it'd help to receive as much knowledge as I can on the subject. Further, might there be an advantage to briefly describing relevant scenes in my essay, as Žižek so often does, in lieu of embedded clips? On the one hand, this move would streamline the complication by maintaining a purely textual essay; on the other hand, I can't possibly imagine paraphrasing a literary text, e.g. Ulysses, for an entire paper without losing rhetorical effect on some demonstrative level. (Good grief, I never thought I would ever align Joyce and Bannon in a metaphorical capacity – I think I may need an ice-cold shower, or perhaps a holy water blessing from Dr. Buck Mulligan himself.) If you're so inclined, I also have a few less-pressing questions: 1) Preferentially, is WordPress the best platform for a multimedia essay such as mine? 2) How does one formalize your page-count with embedded videos, or does this ultimately not matter as much as word-count when submitting to programs? 3) Submitted multimedia essays should preclude peripheral or paratextual content, like expository "About" tabs, right? Thanks everyone!
  12. Hi All, I have a question for those who may have experience regarding withdrawls and PhD admissions. I continued from undergrad into a Master's program with the intention of taking a semester of coursework in order to beef up the PhD applications (English/Lit) I'm currently working on. However, doing so made me realize that I need a break, and the burn out has not only made me consider postponing my applications, but withdrawing from the courses I'm currently enrolled in. While the semester's end is only a few weeks away, there still remains the seminar papers I'll need to submit by December, and my ideas just aren't coming. That said, my concern is with the way these "W"'s could be perceived by future graduate programs -- that is, my first attempt at graduate work ending in a withdrawal. If ever I have to submit these transcripts, all anyone will see is two "W"'s. Could this negatively impact my chances for admission in the future? Has anyone been in this situation?
  13. So I'm new and this is (obviously) my first post after lurking on here for a bit for an answer to a nagging question I have. Not much of an introduction, but hi i guess? Anyway, I have a B.A. in English from UCONN and am applying for a few PhD programs. Going straight for the PhD rather than the MA because my professors recommended it, as they believe my writing is strong enough to do so. As for the components of my applications: letters of recommendation, GRE, C.V., SOP, all that is pretty much taken care of (aka I'm not too worried about them). I'm finished with the CV and SOP, have formally reached out to recommenders who have already offered to write good letters, and am taking the GRE in a few weeks and am confident I can do well. The writing sample, though? Another story. My writing and critical analysis is pretty solid, and the paper I'll be submitting is the final paper for my capstone course. It is without a doubt my best, most scholarly work. My specific interest lies in Irish Lit, as that's what I have a concentration in and that's what my research focus will (ideally) be in grad school. This specific paper is obviously Irish Lit focused, and, as stated, the research/writing is pretty solid. Basically, the issue here isn't writing, it's length. Out of the applications I'm sending, Emory is my first choice. The application requirements say the writing sample needs to be 15-20 pages, and no more than 20. The paper I'd like to submit is 28 including the Works Cited. I'm having trouble cutting it down and even when I remove what I think can reasonably be removed without majorly altering the overall effect, it's still 24 pages. My ultimate question(s) is/are: do I say screw it and submit the full 28 pages? Do I edit it down to 24? Do I edit it further to 20 even though I feel like I'm butchering it, and am getting concerned with how well the overall paper works if certain paragraphs are missing? How badly will it reflect on me if I submit the full 28? I'm also unsure of how to include brief summaries of the sections I would take out to shrink it, i.e. do I put italics in between paragraphs, do I just do an abstract in the beginning? Because Emory is my first choice and I know how competitive it is, I do not want to do anything that would jeopardize my acceptance. I hope this wasn't too confusing and I appreciate anyone's help! I'm so stressed out about the entire process and some reassurance or tips (maybe from some current PhD students from the program if possible) would go a long way!
  14. Hi everyone! Just wanted to start a forum to discuss UF, connect with other UF acceptances..This is specifically for English and MFA but other gators and prospective gators are also welcome! Are you guys considering attending UF? What are your impressions? Any body going to the visit weekend? For me, their admin side seems kinda chaotic but the courses seem interesting and the dept kinda seem nice enough..what I'm most interested in knowing is the "vibe" of the UF dept? Are they generally supportive? How is Gainesville? I guess it differs from person to person but would love to hear your thoughts and impressions...
  15. As an undergraduate student entering my senior year, I have an unfortunate amount of questions regarding the application process for doctoral programs in English literature. Having written extensively on Joyce's Ulysses, I'm primarily interested in the relationship between narrative theory and postcolonial studies, with an emphasis on 20th century modernism. So, then, does anyone know of some top tier doctoral programs known for research in postcolonialism, narratology, and/or modernism? I'm also interested in American postmodern literature—e.g. Thomas Pynchon, Don DeLillo, and David Foster Wallace—but haven't come into contact with many reputable programs renown for that mode of contemporary scholarship, so guidance there would certainly help, too. On a semi-unrelated note, I'm also curious if those of you who have been accepted to top tier (or second-tier) programs 1) applied in the fall prior to graduation, 2) applied in the fall following graduation, 3) applied during an MA program, or 4) applied following the completion of an MA program. Any response to these questions and concerns would be greatly appreciated - thanks!
  16. I'm trying to find others who have applied to the UNC-CH PhD program in English and Comparative Literature. I've seen one acceptance and a few wait listed on the Results Survey. Email inquiry only gave me a generic response that decisions are being made every day, and I'll receive an email.
  17. I have offers for the doctoral programmes at CUNY and NYU. My area of interest is Victorian Studies (Women's Writing). I would be really grateful for any advice/suggestions on what you think is a better programme, which one i choose, or what i should consider while choosing. CUNY's letter mentions some fantastic rankings, but NYU shouldn't be too far behind(if at all) on that front. Both departments have impressive Victorian scholars, though I am more familiar with the work of some of the profs at NYU. Would really appreciate some help on this. ps- I am awaiting the funding decision at CUNY, but just thought i need to start thinking seriously about this, because i may not have much time to decide once they make their funding decision...
  18. I've been able to look up information on average GPAs and GRE scores; however, I'd like to know if anyone can offer advice as to the rest of the application? What about work experience? Volunteerism? Other community involvement? Honors recognitions/ societies? Any suggestions for activities with which I can become involved for my junior and senior years as an English major? What about advice for course-load? Specific classes/ subject areas? Anything else that I might've missed despite my dozen questions? I'm interested in top-tier M.A./ Ph.D. programs, so I would like any and all input as far as preparation goes. Thanks in advance! Much appreciated!!
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