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Found 114 results

  1. Hello all. I need a bit of help deciding between Mills College and Wake Forest for their English MA programs. I've spoken with both schools and will be visiting shortly. They both assure me that they place students very well into top doctoral programs and - at least for Mills - into positions outside of universities (publishing, journalism, private high schools, community colleges, and so on). But neither program seems to have or to want to cough up hard data regarding their past placements. Is this something to be concerned about? Or maybe, more pertinently, does anyone have insight into the standing and success rates of these two schools?
  2. I have been accepted to both U of T and McGill's English M.A. programs, and I really love both!! I have done my undergraduate degree in English at McGill, and if I return for the two-year thesis program, I have been offered a $1500 RAship w/ a supervisor of my choosing. Because I have spent the past four years here, I have strong connections with my professors and am familiar with the expectations of the program. However, U of T has some really appealing options. It is a one-year non-thesis program, which potentially might make me a less enticing PhD candidate (although I do have an undergraduate thesis, so I wouldn't be devoid of research experience), but the courses expect papers of about 20 pages, which is the typical writing sample size for PhD programs. What is most appealing to me is the English community at U of T, as from QS rankings (especially the subject specific ones, which place McGill at 31st for English worldwide and U of T at 12th) it seems that U of T might challenge me more. It's a bigger program, however, and from what I hear it isn't very easy to get to know profs. What would you recommend? Asking for advice from anyone, but especially people familiar with either school and anyone with M.A. experience. I am really interested in doing a PhD program in the States, so that is also something I've been trying to take into consideration. Thank you!!
  3. Hey everyone! I could really use your help: I'm trying to decide on an English or Comparative Literature program and am curious as to whether any of you think that placement records are an important factor in deciding? If so, how do you determine what a good placement record is? Thirdly, why are some schools better at placing students than others? I'm finding this very confusing because strong placement records sometimes don't correspond to the school's level of prestige. For example, I noticed that at Brown's English department, only 7% of graduates in the last 4 years got tenure-track jobs. And at Rutgers, 68% of graduates went on to secure tenure-track jobs.
  4. Hello, I have been accepted to a partially funded MA at Boston College, a PhD at UConn with full funding, and a PhD at UOregon with full funding (all in English Literature). Would it make sense to take the MA as a way to up my chances at a better school for a PhD later? What do you think of the placement records of UConn and UOregon? How much do you think ranking matters in this process? I see the UO is ranked higher, but to me, it looks like UConn might have better placements. Any advice is greatly appreciated! thank you, Lindsey
  5. I'm feeling pretty discouraged about my chances this year (I'm already 3r/0a/3p), so I'm looking for some last minute schools that still take applications that I might have somehow missed. Any programs still accepting applications?
  6. Trying decide whether I want to complete my masters in English lit at Oxford or Cambridge– anyone have any feedback on either program, or on why you chose one over the other? I've read that Cambridge tends to take a more hands-on approach with the students, and emphasizes criticism/theory, whereas Oxford is more historicist? Is this true?
  7. Hi I am applying to english grad programs and have been accepted into two fully funded MA programs. In my statement of purpose I mentioned that I was interested in modernist, 20th century, and African American literature. However, after spending post submission time reading, and reviewing my undergrad work, I think I would be much better and off studying 19th century literature and late victorian literature. I know that MA programs do not expect perfect commitment from undergrads entering MA programs but this seems like a very dramatic shift, and honestly, I don't know even remember why I was ever so committed to modernism. I will be visiting the campuses that offered admissionship soon. Should I ask to speak with faculty aligning with this new research interest or will the faculty not like this? Should I just suck it up and stick with modernism? Will I ever be able to take a little time to really decide on what specific niche I would like to invest in?
  8. I guess I'm getting pretty desperate for information, but has anyone out in the wider Grad Cafe community heard of any PhD English acceptances to McGill? I'm still waiting on my application decision and am fully going crazy. Ugh I just want this to be over!!!! Good luck to all. May we come out of this sane.
  9. Hi, I'm in my second semester as a Ph.D. student in Comparative Literature. I know some people might think that it's too early for me to start worrying about what to do to get hired, others might be thinking that it's never too early, others might be saying "you're a comparative lit. major, there are no jobs" lol, but please just stick with me a moment. I'm looking for advice on how I can become a more competitive applicant when applying for assistant professor jobs (and similar jobs) after I finish my Ph.D. I'm technically first-generation college student (my parents dropped out of college, and my much older sister went to college later through a continuing studies program and received a masters online. However, she doesn't work in academia) so I'm pretty lost here about how all of this works and what's attractive to universities. I'm trying to figure out what I can do to stand out. I've been told that I should go to conferences, so I applied to two and got accepted. Are conferences helpful or do you feel like it doesn't make much of a difference? Should I try publishing more? Researching (you know, outside of my future dissertation work)? If so, how do I start approaching professors or institutions, in general, to start doing that? After graduation, should I apply to a post-doc program? If so, do you know of any stand out ones that I should aim for or even what people look for when hiring post-docs or do you just feel like post-docs are unnecessary? My fellowship requires me to teach one semester gratis. Should I attempt at teaching more? Older students in my department have suggested getting a masters in another department (i.e. English, French, Anthropology, Theatre, etc.) to further diversify myself and make more valuable connections, but I'm not sure if tagging on another year or two to finish another degree for the sake of networking is that beneficial especially when comparative literature programs require you to take courses outside of your department anyway. Should I start building more experiences outside of academia (In undergrad, I was an EIC of a publication for a year, I've also worked in publishing, tutoring, mentoring, and led a social justice/community service non-profit organization for a year, and I minored and worked in social media for a bit-- should I keep doing more things like that in grad school or is it time to refocus and just build on one or two things?) If I sound really young, lost, and a little overwhelmed, it's because I am. I graduated from a private university with a degree in English (writing) in three years and was accepted straight-way into this Ph.D. program when I was 20 going on 21 years old. My program requires 48-course credits, after this semester (I entered in Fall 2017 right now I'm in Spring 2018 semester) I would have 24 credits so I'm approaching that halfway mark with my coursework (I probably need to slow down a bit, but I can't hold a job on this fellowship minus departmental related research/internships relevant to my career so I don't have anything really going on at the moment). I'm required to take a minimum 9 credits Fall/Spring each and a minimum 6 credits in the summer so I'll be at 30 credits when the Fall 2018 semester commences. I'm not at a prestigious ivy league school; I'm in a very small program at a pretty large public university. I don't feel like me being young with a good fellowship is enough to really stand out. So if anyone knows about ways I can further build my CV and experiences to become a better applicant for future jobs, that info would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance!
  10. Which departments in the humanities are the best and worst for landing academic jobs? I got my master's in English literature, but have been thinking about getting my PhD in history or sociology. Three professors (in English and History) strongly advised me to go into English, which apparently is one of the best (albeit still extremely competitive) for academic jobs. They also said History is one of the most difficult. How true is this? Is there any way to validate these claims?
  11. A couple people I know were asked to interview for the UChicago English PhD program, and I wasn't emailed/invited to one. UChicago is one of my top schools and I'm wondering if this means that I've been unofficially rejected. Anybody else have experience with this? Does it come out in rounds or does that lack of an interview mean I'm no longer in consideration?
  12. I applied to Cambridge University's MPhil program for Modern and Contemporary Literature. I have been unable to find information online regarding the MPhil interview process, though I am fairly certain that one does occur. Does anyone have any knowledge regarding this application process? Is there an interview, and if so, at what point (roughly) does the university reach out to request one?
  13. Hello very helpful people! Hope you all are doing well. I've begun submitting my apps—about half way through and have done my top choice because it was due December 1. But on Saturday I found out I've been accepted into a conference for February— a whole other story is how I'm going to prepare for that... My question is: should I reach out to the schools I've submitted my applications to already? I'm going to update my resume and unsubmitted apps to reflect this upcoming conference.
  14. Hi, all Since we've started the application process (I know some have already applied and many of us are likely preparing this week to begin), we are all (I assume) done with any and all WS/SOP major revisions and are focused now on polishing (that is, at least, where I am in this whole thing.) While I sometimes feel like my tweaking is good, I also have a sense that it is not really necessary - while my SOP and WS could, of course, be "better" and definitely different, they are what they are at this point and I'm largely proud of them, regardless of outcome. So, how do you all determine when "good enough is good enough"?
  15. Listing Freelance Work on Resume

    I'm applying for MA programs in composition and rhetoric. My academic and professional background reflects education and editing. (I currently work in technical writing. During undergrad, I student taught high school English and tutored in my university's writing center. I also spent a year copyediting the university newspaper.) I graduated with my BA in English in January 2016. Shortly thereafter, I landed my current job. In May of 2016, a history professor at my university contacted me and asked me to edit her book manuscript. She had asked one of my former English professors if he knew any good student editors, and he recommended me. Over the next three months or so, I edited a sizable chunk of this manuscript (three chapters and the introduction: about 240 pages in all). I deep-conditioned this manuscript at every level, from reordering paragraphs to fixing punctuation errors. I left comments in the documents explaining many of the changes I made and offering advice. During this process, the professor and I corresponded regularly via email. (I didn't meet her until the manuscript was finished, when we were both craving a few celebratory drinks.) Though I'm sure it goes without saying, she paid me for all this. This summer, she informed me the book had been accepted for publication by Cambridge University Press. It will be released in March of 2018, and I'm in the acknowledgements. My two questions are these: Is this experience worth listing on my graduate admissions résumé? If so, what's a good way to go about writing the entry for it? I've been Googling how to list freelance work on résumés, but none of the suggestions I got seemed transferable to a graduate school résumé. I can certainly come up with a list of bullet points for what the work entailed; that's not a problem. I guess I'm wondering what the heading would look like and where on the resume I would put this experience. Is it "work experience," or would it go better under a "related experience" header? Or even "publications"? It seems to blur the line between work and academics. This is what I've got so far. I tried to keep the formatting consistent with the rest of the document: Freelance editing May 2016 - July 2016 Doe, Jane. The Noble History of Socks. Cambridge University Press, forthcoming March 2018. Proofread and copyedited manuscript intended for publication Made global and sentence-level revisions Conferred with author regarding needs, concerns, and goals for manuscript Provided author with targeted feedback What do you think? Is any information missing? Does it look okay? Any suggestions for revision?
  16. Hi, I double majored in Dance and English at UCLA. I am wanting to use my dance theory background in literature. I am particularly interested in how site-specific dance work can be used a lens for characters in literature who propel the narrative with their physicality and inhuman capabilities. Especially plot impact when characters are held in some kind of captivity. For example: Puck and Ariel in Shakespeare and Catherine and Bertha from the Bronté sisters. I realize I'm doing some major genre-hopping so I also wonder about programs that would be more open to that. I'm also particularly interested in MA programs in the UK, but would be open to anywhere that would be a great fit. Thanks!
  17. Sending Multiple GRE Scores?

    Can we send multiple GRE scores to English PhD programs? I can't find anything for or against it on department pages and I'm happy to email programs to ask, but I wanted to check here in case the group knows (and I've just been in the dark).
  18. I'm studying for the Literature Specific GRE exam. Does anyone have any helpful study guides they might be willing to share with me? I tried looking for a class specific to this subject, but no college in my area was hosting a course and the searching online did not bear much fruit.
  19. I am looking for several target universities in the US/UK to pursue my master degree in English, specifically focusing on poetry and poetics. My problem: I don’t know which university will suit me. To give you a picture of what I am looking for: I long to study under Helen Vendler of Harvard University. (Harvard doesn't offer MA in English and continuing directly to a Ph.D is still out of my reach. Thus, I will have to postpone this dream.) What this means is that I want to study poetry mainly in its aesthetic aspects (e.g. what makes a particular poem interesting, what makes a poem well-written/badly written; what is the distinctive voice of a particular poet). As with questions of gender, class, or race through poetry, I have little interest. What university, then, that I should aim for?
  20. I’m applying to a mix of Ph.D. programs, about half of which are in Philosophy and the rest are in English/Literature. I imagine these programs will likely emphasize the Analytical Writing score more than other sections of the GRE, even though they will also expect a very good Verbal score. I took the GRE 4 years ago before applying to Master’s programs and received 161V/149Q/4.5AW. After retaking the GRE last month, I received 159V/147Q/5.5AW. (I'm quite devastated that a month of studying didn't improve my V & Q scores.) I am tempted to submit the newest scores, as they will have a recent date and will demonstrate, along with my Writing Sample, the strength of my writing skills. However, I would be devastated if rejected from programs because the Verbal score from that retake is below 85th percentile. Which scores would you suggest I submit? Would it make sense in my case to submit both scores, or do you think that might hinder my chances? Thank you in advance for any help you can provide.
  21. Oxford MSt programme?

    Hello! I was wondering if there were any Oxford students who are doing a MSt programme. I was curious what the personal statements should be like/contain and if I should reach out to the faculty in the programme now (I am entering my final year of my undergrad). Also, I am interested in applying for the English literature (1900-present) programme specifically - if anyone is in that one, what has their experience been like? Pros and cons? Etc.?
  22. I'm planning to apply for a PhD in English (Literature) and I'm wondering about the foreign language component. All of the schools I'd most like to apply to require 1 or usually 2 foreign languages examined by the end of the second year or so. Yale also mentions on its admission requirements that they want 'preparation in languagessufficient to satisfy the language requirement' and Harvard says that 'While there are no specific prerequisites for admission, a strong language background helps to strengthen the application'. None of the others seem to mention languages at all in their admissions sections, only in the details of what's required during the course. Does anyone know how important the language background is relative to other elements of the application? My personal situation: I have a UK A-Level in Latin and a GCSE in German. I've been working on my German online (duolingo etc.) but I have no new qualifications to show evidence of progress. I did an informal assessment at the Goethe Insitut in London, and they reckon I could probably handle a B1 exam, which the internet reckons is about equivalent to a UK AS-level, halfway between GCSE and A-Level, but I don't know if it really counts for as much on an application. If I did take the exam, it might show that my German is ongoing and improving, but I have relatively little time to prepare for the exam, it's alarmingly close to the application deadline, so if my results don't come on time it might count for nothing anyway, and I think it might be a better use of time to work on my writing samples/preparing for GREs etc. Any advice would be very much appreciated. Thanks a lot.
  23. Does anyone know which flagship schools have a really strong emphasis on theory/cultural studies? I'm only a literature person via my interest in theory. Specifically Foucault, Derrida, Lyotard, Frankfurt School of Marxism, Zizek, and/or Jodi Dean. I have yet to find one bio of someone saying they are an expert on foucault...
  24. Early Modern Lit PhD

    Hi guys, I am looking for some advice about applying to PhD programs. I don't want to go to schools simply because of their reputation or name, I really want to apply to places that will be the best fit for me and my studies. I am interested in Early Modern literature, Animal Studies, and the Early Modern drama (specifically the politics of the stage). Does anyone have any ideas about what programs would best suit that?
  25. I'm having a bit of a dilemma with my pursuit of a second Master of Arts degree. Let me preface this by saying that while a second Master's degree may not seem like a good idea to some, since my first Master of Arts degree is in Museum Studies, the second degree would be complimentary to it in some way. My issue is that I need to attend my second Master of Arts degree as a distance learning/online program, as I do not have access to these programs at the local university and cannot afford to move at this moment and am working a full-time job now. Therefore, the dilemma I face is the following: do I apply to multiple graduate schools in the different fields I am considering as my second Master of Arts and attend the one that I feel is best suited to my goals, or should I focus solely on what I know will help the end goal the most? The issue is this: my local university does not have Classics, Classical archaeology, ancient history, or art history offered at the graduate level here, and those are the areas in which I desire to combine into an interdisciplinary PhD (such as the NYU ISAW or UPenn's AAMW program), but I am seeking out a terminal MA at the moment because I am not able to move yet. I have found that Villanova University offers their Classical Studies MA online but it's synchronous, so I would have to attend at the offered course time, which is doable but challenging. Thus far, that is the only university that I have found that offers a program that would be competitive enough to gain me entry into an eventual PhD. My question is: Should I apply to the Classical Studies by itself or should I apply to Villanova, but also for the second MA programs I am considering, such as Art History, History, Library Sciences (which would help as I work in a museum and often collaborate with the research library, so it would be relevant but not to my end goal of a PhD), and/or English/Creative Writing MFA - it's a hard call because I know it makes me look like I don't have one concentration or focus, but as I will have a Master's in Museum Studies soon, any of these degrees would pair well (I know many will tell me to take the MFA out, which I have considered anyway, since I could always pursue that later if I felt like it). The issue with the art history and history options, is, of course, not many online programs will allow you to focus on ancient history. I know that there are a decent schools in the UK that would be able to offer this (such as the University of Wales Trinity Saint David), but I cannot afford to pay that much out of pocket, so for now I am looking into American schools only. I think the root of my issue is worrying that I won't get into Villanova and then not know what to do with myself if I don't, since there's not that many other options. Help?