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Found 4 results

  1. I'm European and have been admitted to three master programs at good/great universities in other continental european countries. I have to make my decision soon and I feel like I have a good picture of the fit of the programmes and their faculty to my research interests,of student life in these places, and of the overall reputation of the university. However, as a foreign student and someone with no substantial network within my field yet, I have a very hard time assessing how these universities are known in my field and what their strengths and weaknesses are in it. Sorry if this is a basic question, but how did/do you assess this when you can't ask people with more experience? This feels like the missing piece in my decision puzzle, but is also of general interest to me. Any advice/experiences would be appreciated.
  2. Cafe-ers, cafites, and connoisseurs of quality conversation! Thought it might be interesting to create a space for folks interested in pursuing domestic policy jobs/research, particularly given the general conversation here in Government Affairs tends to lean IR. Come, introduce yourself, explore specific policy interests, what you're doing/looking forward to/worried about, or predict where you feel the field is headed under the Trump administration and beyond... For me, I'll be starting my MPP program at Duke in the fall, believe the United States is due for a serious re-tooling of government's organizational structure to reflect the third-industrial-revolution economy, and think state government and action-oriented think tanks are where most innovation will take place in the next decade-plus. What about you?
  3. Hi everyone! I'm new to thegradcafe.com but I desperately need some advice, guidance, ideas, etc. I'm really torn as to what my next move is academically and life-wise. I will be graduating in the spring of 2017 with an overall GPA of 3.2, my degree will be a BA in Political Science with a French minor. I want to go on to get an MA & PhD. The two fields I am leaning towards are History and English/Writing. Clearly I don't have a high enough GPA to get into an upper-level school, so to speak. However, I really want to get my PhD from a top 20 school. My GRE scores were: 148 quant, 162 verbal, 5 writing. I plan to retake the GRE in the spring to see if I can get higher scores. So, what next steps would you recommend? Here is what I've considered. -Go home, work for a year (maybe two) and attend a local university to take one or two graduate courses to make a firm decision on what to get my degrees in. Then apply for an MA/PhD program or just an MA and then my PhD at another school. -Begin an MA program at my state school (a good one) and get that degree, then go on to a top 20 school for my PhD. Basically what I'm wondering is this: -With my current academic standing, would it be beneficial for me to take a few grad courses at my local school, excel in them and then attend a matriculating MA program somewhere that better suits my interests? -Is it frowned upon to get an MA at one university and go to a different one for a PhD? -Would working for a year or two while taking classes (and getting the best grades possible) improve my application package for programs? -Should I take some extra undergrad classes at my local university in history or english since those fields weren't my major field? -Is there any chance, if I excel in an MA program and prove to be a valuable asset, I could be fully funded for a PhD program/get assistantships, etc? -Is there a chance I could go to a lower-ranking school for my MA and potentially get funding if my GRE scores were fantastic? -Is it bad to take a few years away from my undergrad, work and such, and then formally apply for an MA program? I'm dead set on getting a PhD so I know I will go back to school no matter what. I'm leaning towards going home to work, save money, and try a grad class or two to confirm it's what I want to pursue. However, what is realistic for me to pursue after I take those classes and excel? Thank you so much for your time and thoughts! Any and all advice is welcome.
  4. I recently wrote the GRE General Test and received this score: V: 157 Q: 152 AWA: 5 I'm applying to English Literature programs in top schools (Harvard, Stanford, Berkeley, University of Chicago, UPenn, etc.). From what I've seen, my quantitative and writing marks are just fine for English programs, but my verbal reasoning should be 10 points higher (at least 166-167). Realistically, I don't know if studying would increase my verbal reasoning mark significantly enough to make a difference. I'm a very strong candidate in every other respect (I have academic publications, a very high GPA, and a master's degree in English from a Canadian institution). Should I still retake the GRE or do I have a shot of getting into those top schools anyways?
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