Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'georgetown'.

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Comment Card
    • Announcements
  • The Cafe
    • City Guide
    • IHOG: International House of Grads
    • The Lobby
  • Applying to Graduate School
    • The April 15th is this week! Freak-out forum.
    • Applications
    • Questions and Answers
    • Waiting it Out
    • Decisions, Decisions
    • The Bank
  • Grad School Life
    • Meet and Greet
    • Officially Grads
    • Coursework, Advising, and Exams
    • Research
    • Teaching
    • Writing, Presenting and Publishing
    • Jobs
  • The Menu
    • Applied Sciences & Mathematics
    • Arts
    • Humanities
    • Interdisciplinary Studies
    • Life Sciences
    • Physical Sciences
    • Professional Programs
    • Social Sciences

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Pronouns


Location


Interests


Program

  1. Hey everyone! Haven't seen anyone started a thread for this program yet so I'd start one for those applying this year. When do you think we'll hear back about admissions decisions?
  2. Still new on this grad cafe, and haven't followed this forum Haven't received any acceptance. Georgetown, Illinois Urbana Champaign, Maryland - released email for acceptance, I haven't received any, means rejection..? NW, Cornell, Hopkins, UC Boulder, Rutgers, Pittsburgh, Northeastern, SUNY Binghamton - hasn't released any result Is this correct? I still want some hope,,, Please let me know if this is incorrect info!^
  3. Hello all, International with a non-US degree here, I'm applying to several places between the US and the UK for a Mid East degree: MPhil Modern Mid East Studies, Oxford MA Modern History, LSE* AM Mid East Studies, Harvard MA Arab Studies, Georgetown *LSE's new history degree would allow me a pick of modules that could craft an interdisciplinary degree and pad my CV for a PhD (also, the UK's new postgrad visa scheme is very enticing) Anyone have any impressions of the above programs? Anything I should add, or should know? Very keen on hearing from people in similar straits or, better yet, who have gone through Mid East studies postgrad. Should also add that I am: a native Arabic speaker; keen on learning Persian; and very much hope that this degree would position me for a PhD program down the line.
  4. Hello everyone! It is time for me to make very hard choices regarding where I got accepted. I need your opinion on this. The problem is not tuition nor money. Actually, after graduation, my hope is to go back to France and work as a diplomat for the Government or within International Organizations. All programs are very attractive to me, as well as locations. If you have any views / advice / know which one should I consider first / second, please share. Here are the universities (I added a few more): Master in International Affairs (GWU Elliott School) MA in International Relations (Johns Hopkins SAIS) Master in International Affairs (UCSD School of GPS) Master of Science in Foreign Service (Georgetown) MPP (UCLA) Master in International Relations (NYU) Thank you very much!
  5. Hi everyone, I will you like your insights to help me decide which program to attend this fall. I was admitted to several schools however I have narrowed my choice to SAIS MIAR (50K scholarship and first year in Bologna), Pitt GSPIA Master in International Development (Full ride + monthly stipend), and Georgetown SFS Master in Latin American Studies (13K scholarship renewable for second year). I am in my last year of undergrad and my career goal is to join the USAID Foreign Service or the regular Foreign Service. I plan to focus my grad studies in development and human rights with an emphasis in Latin America because that is the region where I would like to work in the future. I also want to become fluent in Portuguese because I already know Spanish and I think that is a helpful language to do work in the region. I like all three programs, however there is some important differences among them. At SAIS I can spend on year in Bologna and the second one in DC, getting a great network at both sides of the Atlantic and having access to tons job/internships opportunities. Besides, SAIS has a great focus on econ and quant skills that would be really helpfu for my future career plans. In addition, is has a great language program where I could improve my Portuguese language skills. SAIS has also a great reputation and practitioners’ professors with many connections which would make easier getting job opportunities. However, of all three schools SAIS has the weakest Latin American program and also the larger class sizes (even though in Bologna classes are smaller than DC). Finally, even though I received a half tuition scholarship, I would be 100K in debt if I end going there because of the cost of living in Bologna and DC. Similarly to SAIS, GSPIA has a good number of econ classes. Moreover, the program is really small 15-20 students which allows for a lot of one-on-one with professors. GSPIA also has a great Latin American program and I am able to take undergraduate Portuguese classes. One of the main issues I have with GSPIA is the location in Pittsburgh which can't compare to the opportunities and networking available at DC (however they offer a semester in DC which could offset the location issue to some extend). They also have the worse ranking of all three schools and is not that well known. Furthermore, most faculty is full-time with limited connection outside academia and the career center is not as strong as the others. However, financially GSPIA would be the best option because considering the cost of living in Pitt and the scholarship they offered, I won't have to take any loans. In the case of Georgetown, its has probably the best Latin American program of all three and also great faculty with many connections. Their program is also really small with only 20-25 students. Moreover, they have an amazing career center and many networking opportunities due to the location in DC and the prestige of SFS. Besides, they also offer free Portuguese classes. The main issue with their program is that is less practical than the other schools and they don't require many econ classes (however, I could do a certificate at the SFS development program where I could improve my econ skills). Financially, Georgetown will be the worse option because I would have to borrow 112K in loans (12K more than SAIS). I would welcome any input to help me in my decision-making. If possible before Tuesday April 20th, because that's my deadline to make a final decision. Thank you!
  6. Hi everyone, I will you like your insights to help me decide which program to attend this fall. I was admitted to several schools however I have narrowed my choice to SAIS MIAR (50K scholarship and first year in Bologna), Pitt GSPIA Master in International Development (Full ride + monthly stipend), and Georgetown SFS Master in Latin American Studies (13K scholarship renewable for second year). I am in my last year of undergrad and my career goal is to join the USAID Foreign Service or the regular Foreign Service. I plan to focus my grad studies in development and human rights with an emphasis in Latin America because that is the region where I would like to work in the future. I also want to become fluent in Portuguese because I already know Spanish and I think that is a helpful language to do work in the region. I like all three programs, however there is some important differences among them. At SAIS I can spend on year in Bologna and the second one in DC, getting a great network at both sides of the Atlantic and having access to tons job/internships opportunities. Besides, SAIS has a great focus on econ and quant skills that would be really helpfu for my future career plans. In addition, is has a great language program where I could improve my Portuguese language skills. SAIS has also a great reputation and practitioners’ professors with many connections which would make easier getting job opportunities. However, of all three schools SAIS has the weakest Latin American program and also the larger class sizes (even though in Bologna classes are smaller than DC). Finally, even though I received a half tuition scholarship, I would be 100K in debt if I end going there because of the cost of living in Bologna and DC. Similarly to SAIS, GSPIA has a good number of econ classes. Moreover, the program is really small 15-20 students which allows for a lot of one-on-one with professors. GSPIA also has a great Latin American program and I am able to take undergraduate Portuguese classes. One of the main issues I have with GSPIA is the location in Pittsburgh which can't compare to the opportunities and networking available at DC (however they offer a semester in DC which could offset the location issue to some extend). They also have the worse ranking of all three schools and is not that well known. Furthermore, most faculty is full-time with limited connection outside academia and the career center is not as strong as the others. However, financially GSPIA would be the best option because considering the cost of living in Pitt and the scholarship they offered, I won't have to take any loans. In the case of Georgetown, its has probably the best Latin American program of all three and also great faculty with many connections. Their program is also really small with only 20-25 students. Moreover, they have an amazing career center and many networking opportunities due to the location in DC and the prestige of SFS. Besides, they also offer free Portuguese classes. The main issue with their program is that is less practical than the other schools and they don't require many econ classes (however, I could do a certificate at the SFS development program where I could improve my econ skills). Financially, Georgetown will be the worse option because I would have to borrow 112K in loans (12K more than SAIS). I would welcome any input to help me in my decision-making. If possible before Tuesday April 20th, because that's my deadline to make a final decision. Thank you!
  7. I know there are a bunch of posts like this, but I am trying to decide between the Global Human Development program at Georgetown SFS and the International Development Studies program at the GW Elliott School. I received scholarships from both, but Georgetown would be about $35k more. I love the GHD program and its community, but it's hard to choose over a much cheaper option. Georgetown seems to be more prestigious and rigorous, but is it worth it in the long run? Any insights are appreciated, thanks!
  8. The answer to this is probably a simple no. However, this MA program suits my interests best, I am interested in multiple faculty members' work, and they have many job positions in initiatives I'm passionate about; I was already planning to hopefully get a graduate associate or TA job at one of their centers (with research that's exactly what I want to pursue). Everything about this program seems perfect except for the recent lack of funding (the biggest factor). Does this program have the prestige that makes it worth it, even without funding? It doesn't help that this is my only acceptance so far (I applied to both PhDs and one other MA but no other acceptances yet). If its name and prestige makes the job market and acceptance into a great PhD easier, then maybe it's worth it. I'm really torn, I'm also first in my family to go to grad school in English, so I'd love some guidance on this.
  9. Hi there! Posting to ask about recommendations of MA program in political science. International applicant here, with interest in democratic theory and ethnic politics. Currently received offers from U of Toronto MA in Polisci (1yr program, no funding, not thesis based program, 26k CAD tuition fee) and Georgetown MA in Democracy and Governance (2yr program, no funding, 120k expense for two years study including living expense) Still waiting for response from NYU, Chicago and UBC Any thoughts or recommendations? Thanks!!!
  10. Hi folks, For a Masters in international affairs and/or security - which program do you feel is best? I've been working as a program officer at an international peace organization for the past two years, and have recently finished up a BA in political science with a 3.94 GPA. I speak French, English, and Spanish, so language isn't an issue in terms of the francophone community in Geneva (I did my undergrad in French). I'm looking at applying to these schools in the fall of 2021 or 2022, depending on how the pandemic is, and will be working in my current role until then and as a research associate at a security-oriented think-tank in South Asia. The reason I'm putting the question forward is because of jobs and employability within the peace/conflict studies world - Geneva is widely regarded as the centre of the peacemaking world. London and DC obviously have some great opportunities as well, and a great name. I've heard that DC has a lot of jobs but the competition is cutthroat and often times you're stuck with a position you're overqualified for - not sure how true this is, but it scared me. What do you folks think? How do the namesakes of the schools weigh out, and where is best for someone looking to work in peacebuilding and/or security spaces, and not necessarily as a government analyst? TIA!
  11. I'm creating this new forum for those who applied to the Latin American Studies program at Georgetown. Please feel free if you want to introduce yourself and talk about the admissions process. Good luck!!
  12. Hey guys! I'm currently considering these three schools and programs and would love some insight: Master's in Global Policy Studies at UT Austin Master of Arts in Arab Studies at Georgetown University International Policy and Development at Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey Just a couple notes: Location isn't super important. I know the argument for a lot of East Coast and big name schools is that they're ideal for networking and opportunities. However, I do have a job lined up post-grad that will be in DC, so the need to network and be in the heart of everything IR isn't as strong. My thoughts: While I already know that the LBJ School and Georgetown have fantastic programs, I was more drawn to Middlebury in terms of smaller class sizes, their focus on language and faculty seem to really promote the idea of decolonizing the international policy and development field and diversifying perspectives. While living in an active city like Austin is a pro for me, the fact that UT Austin is known for being a typical party school for undergrads makes it a little less appealing. While I might've enjoyed that experience as an undergrad, I'm a little less thrilled as a potential grad student -- especially since the undergrad presence is quite large compared to the number of grad students on campus. I really like Georgetown as an institution, but my cons are that I've heard from peers that the atmosphere can be super cutthroat and unforgiving. I've managed to escape that toxicity during undergrad and I don't willingly want to waltz right into it. My other con is that that it's in DC. Since my career is set in stone to be in DC, I wanted to take this time to explore a different part of the US. I went to undergrad on the East Coast too and I just wanted a different experience for grad school. If any of you know anything about these schools or specifics on these three programs, I'd love to hear your thoughts and experiences. To be honest, I am leaning towards Middlebury at the moment but the fact that there isn't too much out there about the school and students' experiences does concern me a bit -- in addition to the city of Monterey being a slow beach town that's insanely expensive. Tuition isn't a factor for these schools, but the cost of living is. If y'all were me, which one would you choose and/or which one would you cross off your list immediately?
  13. Hi Everyone, I was accepted to both the MSFS program at Georgetown and the MA program at SAIS (Johns Hopkins) (DC/Bologna). I received almost double the funding at SAIS than Georgetown and I am really torn about which program to choose. The rankings are pretty close but Georgetown is #1 right now, even though these alternate quite a bit. My main question is "Is the MSFS degree at Georgetown worth almost double the amount than SAIS?" I would love any insight or clarity about this question. I know both programs are great, but would like to hear more insight about if SFS is actually worth that much more? Thanks!
  14. Anyone out there apply? Heard any indication on notification date?
  15. Starting a post for all those waiting it out with the Georgetown MPP program for fall 2020. Personally applied by the Jan 15th deadline.
  16. Hi Everyone, I thought this forum was a super helpful resource when I was applying for grad schools and didn't see a lot of information about Georgetown's Global Human Development program, so I wanted to give it a shoutout! I am a current student in the program and would be happy to answer any questions about GHD, the application process, etc. Just to emphasize a few highlights here - two of my favorite things about GHD are the program itself and the people. I chose GHD for its practitioner oriented approach to development - both through the curriculum itself and the co-curriculars like internships, the summer field placement, and the capstone project. The classes are very practical and hands on. For example, the core course in Strategy, Design, and Implementation provides the skills to identify and deconstruct a problem, conduct a socio-economic landscape analysis, design an intervention, pitch a program, etc. Other classes provide technical skills in data analysis, evaluation, economics, and more. And the program itself is super flexible, so you can tailor your specialization or other classes directly with your interests. The people are also a HUGE part of why I chose and why I love GHD. More than any other program I applied to, the GHD program is a tight-knit supportive cohort of students and professors. The professors in particular come from incredible backgrounds and have amazing resources and connections. There is also a good mix of academics, professors of practice, and current practitioners, which provides a really fantastic and diverse perspective to many of the issues we discuss. They are also very engaged and supportive and go well above and beyond to support us both personally and professionally. For example, this year one of my classmates mentioned how she was passionate about linguistics and one of the professors remembered this and created a workshop, led my World Bank professionals, on this topic for her and anyone else that was interested. They are also great about helping us navigate the field and get connected with opportunities with DC and abroad. I'll stop there for now, but definitely respond or reach out if you have any questions!
  17. Hi Everyone, I thought this forum was a super helpful resource when I was applying for grad schools and didn't see a lot of information about Georgetown's Global Human Development program, so I wanted to give it a shoutout! I am a current student in the program and would be happy to answer any questions about GHD, the application process, etc. Just to emphasize a few highlights here - two of my favorite things about GHD are the program itself and the people. I chose GHD for its practitioner oriented approach to development - both through the curriculum itself and the co-curriculars like internships, the summer field placement, and the capstone project. The classes are very practical and hands on. For example, the core course in Strategy, Design, and Implementation provides the skills to identify and deconstruct a problem, conduct a socio-economic landscape analysis, design an intervention, pitch a program, etc. Other classes provide technical skills in data analysis, evaluation, economics, and more. And the program itself is super flexible, so you can tailor your specialization or other classes directly with your interests. The people are also a HUGE part of why I chose and why I love GHD. More than any other program I applied to, the GHD program is a tight-knit supportive cohort of students and professors. The professors in particular come from incredible backgrounds and have amazing resources and connections. There is also a good mix of academics, professors of practice, and current practitioners, which provides a really fantastic and diverse perspective to many of the issues we discuss. They are also very engaged and supportive and go well above and beyond to support us both personally and professionally. For example, this year one of my classmates mentioned how she was passionate about linguistics and one of the professors remembered this and created a workshop, led my World Bank professionals, on this topic for her and anyone else that was interested. They are also great about helping us navigate the field and get connected with opportunities with DC and abroad. I'll stop there for now, but definitely respond or reach out if you have any questions!
  18. Hi all, Somewhat new here. I'll try to keep this short. I've just been accepted to SAIS (MAIA/Bologna campus) with €25,000 funding per year which comes out to about a solid 50% scholarship. I've had my eyes on this program for years and have essentially been doing my best to keep my life and career in Europe (hence the European campus). I am fluent in German/French with intermediate Russian/Italian. The "problem" is that I'm not sure if I realistically have "better" options long term. Here's a quick look at my profile: GPA: 3.8/4.0 GRE: V: 162/Q: 158/W: 5.5 (I think I can realistically get up to 325 combined with preparation, although I've already taken the GRE twice...) In addition, back to back Fulbright ETA years (Germany/Austria), 1 year peace corps service (Eastern Europe), graduate level coursework in German (Middlebury) and--here's the kicker--a potential research/coordinator position at a top business school (first initial with "H" and includes "B" + "S"). While I was pumped to get my offer at SAIS, I'm feeling a bit of reserve in the event that an additional round of apps (undesirable) might produce offers at schools I simply did not have the time/LOR's in place to apply to this last cycle (i.e. SFS/Jackson). Complicated matters further is that my career plans have become a bit more fuzzy since undergrad. I'm definitely an "academic" at heart and feel somewhat ambivalent towards the Econ concentration at SAIS (I am not envisioning a career in consulting), however I'm not sure that additional acceptances even at Georgetown etc. would yield equal funding while simultaneously setting me back by an additional year (currently 25). Hope this isn't too much info. I'm really just trying to get more insight, so all input is welcome. Thanks!
  19. Hi! I've applied to the following programs, and I was hoping to get some insight into which programs were worth the inve$tment - in terms of employability / phD prospects afterwards! Would love to hear any feedback! Thank you!! Stanford MA in POLS (Policy, Organization and Leadership Studies) - pending Columbia University MA in Education Policy - pending University of Pennsylvania MsEd in Education, Culture and Society - admitted with $10,000 scholarship and option to apply for GA (max. $3,500) Georgetown University MA in Educational Transformation - (unofficially) admitted with $15,000 scholarship NYU MA in Education and Social Policy - admitted with $500 fellowship at Education and Social Policy Institute Background about me: I'm an international student. My interests lie in the role of education policy as a tool for mitigating inequality in society. I hope to work in a think tank in the US after graduation. I'd appreciate any help, especially from people who have experience in any of these programs, on sorting out which programs best suit me. As an international student from a developed country, I don't qualify for many scholarships other than the merit-based scholarships offered at admission and am concerned about investing in a degree that will not maximize my employment potential in the long term. I'm also happy to answer questions as well, if anyone has any about the admissions process!
  20. Hi Grad Cafe. I'm exploring the possibility of applying to a Masters in International Relations program after being out of school for a bit. I've been looking at Tufts' Fletcher School's MALD and Georgetown's M.S. in Foreign Service as ideal programs for my career goals. However, I was looking at how both schools have a foreign language proficiency. I was a language minor in college with three years of Japanese study. I still study it lightly but I am wondering about how intensive the examinations are, particularly the oral examinations, so I can figure out a study regime for preparation if I decide to pursue applying next cycle. Does anyone have any familiarity with Georgetown's School of Foreign Service and/or Tufts' Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy language proficiency components in terms of proficiency level and how it might relate to the Japanese Language Proficiency Test (JLPT)? At the end of my minor, I was nearly at JLPT N3 level and am wondering if that places me around what they are looking for or if I need to intensify my studying.
  21. Hi everyone, I know admissions decisions are still a long ways away, but I thought it could be helpful to discuss the comparative merits of these great IR and public policy programs. I applied to HKS's MPP, Columbia's MIA, Georgetown's MSFS, WWS's MPA, and SAIS's MA. I also applied to Georgetown's Security Studies Program, but am leaning away from the latter now because of high tuition costs and rumored lack of aid. How do you feel these schools compare to one another, in terms of job prospects, curriculum/course offerings, school culture, academic rigor, faculty? Which would be your dream program and why?
  22. I’m trying to decide whether to pursue the MSFS or SSP at Georgetown. I’m also interested in the graduate certificate in Arab Studies. My main career goal is to be an intelligence analyst in the counterterrorism field but I’m very interested in politics and international affairs overall. I’ve read that MSFS is the “golden child” program at SFS and I’m worried that the SSP doesn’t measure up to it. I think I am more attracted to the rigor and faculty of the MSFS, but it concerns me that the program is only offered full time (whereas SSP is offered part time). I will barely be able to afford Georgetown as it is so I was really planning on working while in school and taking advantage of employer tuition reimbursement. I don’t want to settle on SSP and spend so much time and money if it’s not as respected of a program.
  23. I got a full tuition scholarship at SAIS, which has me very close to accepting my offer there. My only hesitation is that right now I don't see myself in a job related to finance/trade/banking or even economics in general. I freaked myself out a little after comparing the "Employment Outcomes" sheet for SAIS with the sheet from Georgetown and seeing a lot more financial institutions for SAIS grads. I also have a contact who works on security issues at the State Department who told me that most SAIS grads at State work in Economic and Business Affairs or as Econ Desk Officers in the Political Bureau rather than on other issues. I went to the open house last week where they made the case that you need to have a grasp on economics to fully understand any issue in international relations, which I think I buy to a certain extent. Is SAIS still a strong program for people interested in issues (security, human rights, etc) that are not directly related to economics? At present I have been offered much more funding from SAIS than Georgetown so I think it is probably worth sacrificing a bit of "fit" for a significant cost difference, but I also want to make sure that I am not limiting myself to one type of work. Any insight on this would be very appreciated!
  24. I plan to apply to the MSFS program at Georgetown for Fall 2019 as well as a few other international relations programs. My long term goals include a career in the counterterrorism field. I'm interested in the University of Maryland's Graduate Certificate in Terrorism Analysis and I'm wondering if you all think it would have any affect on my chances of getting into grad school. Would it help pad my application or are certificates largely irrelevant to admissions committees? what about for scholarship prospects? For what it's worth, the certificate program is only one year long (2 semesters and I would start Fall 2018) and my employer will pay for it, so there is really no downside for me.
  25. Hi I have been extremely lucky in being accepted into two great universities for my masters. Before I provide the details of the programmes, here is a little bit about my background. I hold a Bachelors in Business Studies from a reputed Indian university. My interest in economics is mostly fuelled by textbooks, online courses and, a few introductory courses at college. I plan to get a job after my master's programme somewhere in the development policy sector. Georgetown University: Pros: DC hence internship opportunities, math camp, more quantitative courses Cons: Expensive, not a lot of research opportunities Penn State University: Pros: Cheaper, a thesis component, PhD level courses- they are taught separately to masters programme. In the second year, can choose from PhD field courses. Cons: Small city, new programme Any help is greatly appreciated. Thank You
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.