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Found 178 results

  1. Hello everyone, I am new to this forum and really want some suggestions in my coursework. Here's a little of my background: I am a Math and Econ double major junior and want to pursue a Ph.D. in Economics after graduation, but also open to the option of going to a master program before the Ph.D. program. I transferred from a state flag to a top 15 private school in this academic year. And I find the peer pool is much more competitive than previous one and it's hard to perform well consistently to obtain an A. At my first two years, my overall GPA is around 3.94. But last semester I had 6 courses and got 3.61. I also got a B in undergraduate-level math analysis class. This semester, the situation is getting worse. I have 5 courses and 1-credit research course. Since I am trying to do a Computer Science minor, I am taking Data Structure in C++ right now but did bad on my midterms and the best grade I can get for this class is B. But I still have one final and 2 problem sets to go and I am not confident at all. Moreover, I am also taking Abstract Algebra this semester, which I also do not do well on it. I think I need to work very hard to ace my final to obtain a B+/B on it. My current plan is to retake Abstract Algebra next semester. My school's math department only opens one Analysis class and one Abstract Algebra class with 20 seats each next semester, and I am on the waitlist of both ( 20th for Analysis and 3rd for Abstract Algebra). So I can possibly only get into Abstract Algebra. So here are my concerns: Do I need to retake Data Structure next semester? If I do so, then I will not be able to finish my CS minor. If I do not retake it, will the low grade in CS courses hurt my application for graduate programs? Thank you for reading such long post!
  2. Hello everyone, I thought I would start a forum for people to ask and answer questions regarding the MIRHR graduate program at The University of Toronto for 2018. Good luck to everyone who is applying!
  3. I am applying for master degree at cornell cals for graduate student assistantship. They required directly contact to professor first then, I will be eligible to apply for their program. In announcement, it said: Applicant should have a record of outstanding academic performance(eg. >3.5 GPA), strong GRE scores (75th percentiles), and other related experince. I don't have GRE scores but, I am going to give it a try since I think I have strong academic experineces. My GPA is 3.29, but I think my other related experinces is valuable. -> Should I indicate in the email that I don't have GRE scores or not? -> Also, should I attach in the email of extra letter for low cum.GPA explanation letter? Plz,,give me an advice.. Thanks all!
  4. There seem to be a lot of threads asking the same thing popping up lately and I figured it might make sense to make an overall guide thread and then those who feel their answers still haven’t been adequately answered can post below for an idea of what their chances are. Here is a brief rundown of factors affecting your likelihood of getting into top-tier and well respected programs. If you fall below par in any one of these factors you can bump it up by being stellar in one of the others. I'll add to this if others point out other things I've left out. School requirements: Your first stop should be the school admissions website – this will tell you what prerequisites you need, give you an idea of GRE and GPA requirements and what work experience is expected (if any) GPA: From what I’ve seen/read over the years any GPA over 3.4 and you should be competitive. That’s not to say if your GPA is lower than 3.4 you’ll have no chance, but if you have a GPA above 3.4 you should be in good shape. GRE score: GRE scores seem to be most important for schools with demanding quantitative programs and for securing the top financial aid. Most schools will state the average GRE scores for their incoming classes on their website – use these to see how competitive you are. By and large you should be competitive if you score over 650 on verbal and quantitative and over 4.0 on the AWA. For the top schools over 700 seems to be closer to the mark. Work experience: For most programs it will be expected that you have at least 1-2 years of relevant experience in your field. This can be lowered a little if you have other pseudo-relevant work experience (management in the for-profit sector etc.) but you should have shown some level of professional interest in the area you hope to study at grad school. Applicants coming straight out of undergrad may find it very hard to get into the programs aimed more at junior/mid-career professionals such as Johns Hopkins SAIS and Princeton’s WWS. Language skills: For a lot of programs being able to speak a second language is a must, while for others it is just a very good selling point. If you can show experience working in a foreign language this will show adaptability and will endear schools looking to enrol a diverse group of applicants. Quantitative requirements: A lot of schools will want you to show experience in micro/macroeconomics and some maths/statistics courses. You can fullfil these through undergrad classes or by taking courses at a community college/diploma program. Overseas experience (work, study and teaching): Work overseas and study abroad are also viewed extremely favourably by admissions committees and if you have taught English abroad, worked in the Peace Corps or otherwise gained experience living in a developing country this will really strengthen your application. It also shows you to be a go-getter, and that you can bring this outside experience to grad school study. Statement of Purpose: This is where it all comes together. This is your chance to impress the admission committee and show how your personal 'arc' has brought you to this point - being the perfect addition to their grad school. This more than any other part of your application will determine how admit committees view you as an applicant and it's also one of the only application variables that's completely under your control. Having a cohesive narrative that brings together life experience, past academic history and professional experience is a must. It also gives you a great chance to showcase your writing style - so make sure no grammar/spelling mistakes make it into your final revision. Great list of SOP pitfalls If your profile matches at least 3 or 4 of the criteria listed above then you are competitive to apply to an MPA/MPP/IR program. What is most important about any grad school application is showing fit – that is how your profile matches the speciality of that school and its program. If you can’t articulate compelling reasons why you are a good match for them and vice versa, question whether you should be applying to that program. A note on applying to top schools: It is worth noting that nobody here can tell you what your chances of getting into a top program (Harvard, Princeton, Georgetown etc.) because getting into a top program requires a certain amount of luck as well as a great profile. Some people get offers from Harvard with a 2.9 GPA, but also happen to have singlehandedly retaken an allied command post in the Korengal valley. It’s down to who reads your application and what they happen to be looking for with the current application cycle. Spend time improving the elements of your application that you can (GRE, work experience, languages) and don’t waste time freaking out about the things you can’t change (GPA). If you’ve read all of the above and really still can’t tell if your application is competitive, post your profile below.
  5. Hey guys, I recently applied to the advanced standing social work program at UIC for the fall of 2018. I’m pretty worried about my chances of getting in and I can’t find much information about other worried people’s admission results. I’m graduating this May from SIUC with my bachelors in social work. I went to a community college for my first 2 years. I have a cum. GPA of 3.0 but I show a lot of improvement in my grades. I went from a semester gpa of 2.0 at community college to a 3.6 at SIU. I’m in a sorority and I have a lot of different volunteer experiences and hours. I submitted 3 LORs. I talked to someone from admissions before I submitted my application and expressed my concern about my chances of getting in because of my GPA. She said that there are around 1,000 applicants and she said they accept somewhere around 200 for the regular 2 year program but since I will have my BSW and id do the advanced standing program, I have a much higher chance of getting in because of the fewer number of applicants with BSWs. Can anyone share their experience of getting accepted or denied into this program?
  6. I have a bit of a dilemma that I'm trying to puzzle my way through. I am currently pursuing a degrees in Computer Science and International Relations. I have really good grades in my IR program (>3.7), but really terrible grades in my CS program (~3.0). This is due to a lack of preparedness for the rigor of the STEM classes I was taking coupled with a few personal issues that impacted my performance overall. Overall I have a GPA that's around a 3.47, and I was hoping to get that up to a 3.5, but due to a really bad last semester (too many classes and responsibilities), that's unlikely to happen now. I want to eventually get a doctorate in International Relations, but I am trying to also use my technical experience as a pitch to differentiate me from other applicants (since I focus on IR policy in tech), and do have an interest in utilizing my technical skills in research and occupational capacities in the future. I do have research experience -- I've published a paper in comparative politics and am currently working on one in data science that will hopefully be published soon. I currently have a software engineering internship lined up for the summer, but I have an option to drop one of my classes now and retake it over the summer, when I would have much more time to invest the necessary effort to get a good grade and push my GPA up. However, this would require me to drop the software engineering internship. Basically what I'm trying to figure out is if its worth it to drop an internship with valuable work experience for the sake of getting my GPA up to that 3.5 threshold. Part of me thinks its probably better to just get accepted to a Master's Program somewhere and do really well with the work experience, but I'm not completely sure. It's still possible for me to graduate with a 3.5, but it's just very unlikely given the amount of time I know I need to invest.
  7. My bachelor's is a three year course, and I'm entering the third. I desperately want to get into a good grad school for behavioral economics. Here are my details: - GPA: Indian equivalent of 2:1 is stated as 3.3, and that is the requirement for most schools. My GPA is currently 3.51, but it will dip significantly because of a terrible semester owing to health issues and hospitalization (down to 3.0-ish, I assume). My college doesn't offer semester retakes. I have a year to build it back up, so I'm hoping to do well now. - TOEFL/GRE: Haven't taken yet - Subjects: Major in economics, minors in psychology and sociology, and my two semester electives are quant and physics. - Work: I've done one research assistantship under a renowned Indian economist, and one research project for an NGO. Both incorporated some aspect of Behavioral Economics and were great experiences. I have the time to do one more internship before I apply. - Academic projects: I have 6 unpublished projects in economics and psychology. (our college makes us work like crazy) - Publications: I have 2 journal publications, 2 op-eds, and I co-authored a chapter in a PhD. - Extra curriculars: I do not have any awards but I have been featured and recognized extensively for my music and social activism, and I co-founded a web based social activism portal. What can I do better? How do I move forward? Do I have the chance to get into a top school despite my GPA?
  8. Hi everyone! I'm currently a senior at a tier-2 liberal art college with a double major in mathematics and computer science. My current postgraduation plan is working as a software engineer in a financial company, however, I would love to eventually go back to school to get my master or PhD. My only concern at the moment is my GPA (3.1 ~ 3.2), and I have not taken the GRE yet. I was wondering if anyone has experienced similar situations or expressed similar concerns? If so, please comment below and let's discuss about it.
  9. Let me first start off by saying that I am not doing poorly in linear algebra because I don't understand it, rather there was a misunderstanding with my professor. I had my first linear algebra exam last Wednesday. I was up very late studying for the exam, however, at around 3 am I got super sick (it was something I ate). I was legit puking every 20 minutes, I couldn't make it to my morning exam. I don't have insurance so I didn't see a doctor and get a note. I went to the dean of students, and because of that my professor gave me an offer to replace my zero exam 1 grade with 2/3 of my final exam grade. ex. if I got an 100 on the final exam, my zero will be replaced with a 66. However, the exam averages in this professors class are in the low 70's, so going off of that I will either end up with a low B or C in the class, and thats assuming I score around 10 points above average for the rest of the exams. I currently have two W's on my transcript-- one in computer science from my second semester (retaking next semester) and one in actuarial science from my third semester (he curved the class so only the top 40% passed, also changed my major so I didn't need the class). I am currently in my fourth semester, so this means that if I drop this course I will have a W on my transcript for the third semester in a row. I think this creates a poor representation of who I am as a student, as it shows that I won't be able to handle a graduate school course load because I keep dropping one course every semester. I want to get into a good graduate school for economics. I am currently double majoring in math and econ. I am a transfer, My first semester at my new school was last semester, where I got a 3.3 GPA. I am trying to get this up by getting straight A's this semester and my last two years. If my GPA still isnt high enough, I would be willing to do an extra semester or two to take extra courses. Now, I do believe that I will get A's in all of my other courses, however, I think getting a 'W' in linear algebra will make this look not as impressive. I'm thinking about staying in the course, getting a B or C, and just retaking it over the summer online. The original grade will still be on my transcript, but it won't count towards my GPA. Would grad schools look past this? What should I do? This is such a terrible situation... :/
  10. estan

    MSW two degree GPA

    I am an international student from Canada studying in the USA. I completed a BA in psychology about 4 years ago in Canada and had a terribly low GPA (2.0). Following that I did a social service worker diploma ( equivalent to an AA level degree) in Canada and graduated with a 3.6. I am now living in the United States and will be completing a BSW with a predicted overall GPA of 3.8 and a concentration GPA of 4.0. I was only required to complete 48 credit hours to complete this degree of which 36 are letter grades and 12 are pass fail (for my internship). My cumulative GPA would likely not meet the entrance requirements, because I do not believe my AA degree will be counted toward my overall cumulative GPA. I was wondering if anyone has had any experience with this type of situation before, and whether or not they were successful in obtaining admittance. I am 100% a different student then I was when I was younger. I was in a much different place in my life and my grades from then are not indicative of my ability. I require an on campus program which I know due to limited space can be more difficult to gain admittance so I really am just searching for some information as to how to be successful in being admitted.
  11. I graduated with a bachelor degree in business administration in 2006 (foreign country). We don't do GPA there, but my uGPA is probably around 3.0. I worked on the family business for a while, then moved to the U.S. (husband was transferred). I didn't work for a very long time, just published a few ebooks online (in my native language). I knew I wanted to go back to school for a long time, but (not worth explaining the whole situation here) my husband wouldn't let me. Fast forward 10 years I got a divorce and enrolled in a community college to start getting core science courses. I'm halfway through with a 4.0 GPA. I always had a passion for science and only went to business because of family pressure. I live in Boston, so there's a lot of opportunities in biotech here, but for most part, you need a PhD to have a successful career in industry (I don't want to work in academia). I'm trying to get it right, now that I'm "free", so to speak. But here's the thing: I'm 37 years old, with no science background, other than these community college classes. I initially thought I would need a second bachelor degree in science to successfully make this change and be accepted in a PhD program. However, professors and counselors I've been talking to say that I don't need another undergraduate degree and that doing a masters after the core science block would be enough. My concern is that my GPA is too low for graduate school, but as I've been reading, it seems that the way that education works in the U.S., I can never erase my past. That number will follow me forever, regardless of a second bachelors. How much coursework would be necessary to raise my uGPA to acceptable levels? I also hear that the farther you are from your previous education, the less important it is. But the problem is that I haven't done much of anything since then, other than be a housewife. On the other hand, due to financial aid limitations to second bachelor candidates and lifetime limit on federal loans, the only schools that I could afford to attend are the state schools, which in MA are not well regarded. I've also been told that associating myself with say, UMass, would be more detrimental to my application. I'm trying to figure out if getting a bachelor in biology or biochemistry would really raise my chances of getting into a doctorate program in genetics/biotech, or if I could "fix" my GPA with an associate degree in science and then proceed to get a masters before applying. Some people suggested getting the Harvard Extension School masters in biotechnology and then applying to a full time masters in a really good school. HES would be an "intermediate step" between my weak background and a strong science program. I'm lucky enough to already work in biotech (as an executive assistant) and have the chance to do real scientific research in my community college (in molecular biology), participate in journal clubs (which I hear, students only get exposed to in graduate school). So, I believe these things are a plus and may offset the fact that I don't have degree in science. What do you guys think?
  12. confused23

    Engineering Grad vs Undergrad

    Hey guys, I'm currently finishing up my Junior year as a MechE major at UC Berkeley. I am pretty keen on going to grad school to study Mechatronics or Information Systems(not exactly engineering but comparable i guess). The only thing that really discourages me is that I have a lowish GPA here(3.3 with a slight inflation due to humanities courses). Assuming I am able to get into a grad school(USC, Purdue or schools of similar or calibre), I am very concerned about whether I will be able to maintain a 3.5+ gpa there(I've heard most companies prefer that grad students maintain at least a 3.5). I work pretty hard to do slightly above average at Berkeley, and I'm afraid it's severely affecting my confidence about my potential grad school performance(I know this sounds a little naive but hey). I was wondering if someone could give me any insight into what grading is like in engineering grad schools? Are the curves just as harsh? Is there anything I can do to better prepare for the workload? Any advice would be appreciated
  13. Hello, I am electrical engineering major and My GPA is 2.65/4.0 My GRE score is V:145, Q:158 AW: 3.5. I applied about 17 schools, and I already got 4 rejects... The rank of schools varies from top 20 to top 100. Could you recommend any schools that I could get an acceptance letter possibly? Thank you.
  14. Sunspeechies

    Graduate School Admissions

    Hello! I'm currently a Senior in college aspiring to become a speech pathologist. I've had a rough college career starting off with my mom passing away and some family problems. I was orginally nursing which contributed to my low GPA until I found Speech pathology. My GPA was really affected and my overall gpa is currently a 3.09 and my major gpa is a 3.11. I still have my spring semester left and Im staying an extra semester in order to retake some classes I had trouble with. I want to apply within Illinois (midwestern, Urbana-Champaign, Elmhurt, Xavier and Northern illinois). I'm just wondering if i'm being unrealistic and if there are any schools that would be willing to take a student like me? Thank You!
  15. Hello all, I'm back again with some more data. For those of you that are unfamiliar with my original post, I create a procedure in R that scrapes the results survey and output some pretty-ish graphics from the data. After a bit of cleaning and consolidating, I looked into things like: common interview days, most popular schools, and most popular program types... The data is based on self-report and isn't always the cleanest, so I have't taken the initiative to make more profound "predictions". But here I am, one last time, to give some info on the qualitative metrics behind an application (i.e., GPA, GRE Verbal, GRE Quant, GRE AWA) to see if there is really a difference in those that get accepted and those that get rejected. I split the data further by program type; however, some of the programs (e.g., Developmental Psych, Quant Psych, Neuro) had such a small sample of candidate that reported their scores that I had to aggregate them-- these programs are in "psychology: other". Once again this data is not parametric because it lacks independence of scores and possibly normalcy. A candidate may be in the rejected or accepted sample multiple times given they reported their scores for multiple schools, so be cautious when coming to conclusions. Also we have no clue how accurate reported scores are; candidates may have forgotten their score or flipped their quant and verbal (these are things I cannot account for). Conclusion: I had to actually go back and look at the raw data because the results weren't as I expected. There are many occasions where those rejected had a higher average than those accepted. I will work on further validating my numbers but I can say that the average score between those rejected and those accepted (based on the Grad Cafe sample) don't seem to consistently differ. This trend is not consistent across programs. Social Psych applicants seem like the smarties among the top program-types. Another conclusion is that it seems the grad cafe sample is higher on these metrics than an average applicant (I need to do more research) but given the average GRE scores are definitely above the 50th percentile, GPA is also high too. The data is on the last few pages. Those of you that haven't seen the other graphics please feel free. You can see it HERE. I'm also going to attach the file for those of you that don't trust clicking links (though I promise it's safe). Grad Cafe Decisions.pdf
  16. confused23

    Engineering Grad vs Undergrad

    Hey guys, I'm currently finishing up my Junior year as a MechE major at UC Berkeley. I am pretty keen on going to grad school to study Mechatronics or Information Systems(not exactly engineering but comparable i guess). The only thing that really discourages me is that I have a lowish GPA here(3.3 with a slight inflation due to humanities courses). Assuming I am able to get into a grad school(USC, Purdue or schools of similar or calibre), I am very concerned about whether I will be able to maintain a 3.5+ gpa there(I've heard most companies prefer that grad students maintain at least a 3.5). I work pretty hard to do slightly above average at Berkeley, and I'm afraid it's severely affecting my confidence about my potential grad school performance(I know this sounds a little naive but hey). I was wondering if someone could give me any insight into what grading is like in engineering grad schools? Are the curves just as harsh? Is there anything I can do to better prepare for the workload? Any advice would be appreciated
  17. I'm trying to narrow down a list of schools to apply for but I'm having a hard time figuring out which schools are reaches and which I have a decent chance of getting into. My stats break down into SLP GPA: 3.65, Cumulative GPA 3.75, GRE I haven't taken yet but I'm assuming based on my test taking ability that I would score somewhere around 150 on both sections and around a 4 on the writing. I will have completed my undergrad program in communication sciences and disorders in 3 years and am adding another year to work on 2 minors (health promotion and adapted physical activity), I have done some observations and done a lot of volunteering, but no research. I will be applying in the Fall of 2018. I'd love some advice of schools I can realistically get into.
  18. matrenholm

    cumulative GPA and explanaion

    So I went to two schools. First school I did totally crappy and got a 2.4 gpa and then transferred to a better school and got a 3.4. Do I have to average these out and technically, my cumulative GPA is under 3.0 and I need to supplement my application with an explanation of why my gpa was crappy? I'm applying to MSW programs by the way.
  19. Hi all, I'm ashamed to post this to complete strangers but I'm hoping you all might be able to give me some advice. I started college in 2003 and had to leave prematurely due to medical issues. At that time, I had what was to later be diagnosed as schizoaffective disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, and a severe depressive disorder. This was so rough on me that my GPA plummeted to an abysmal 2.1. Fast-forward to today. My conditions, though not cured, have improved dramatically and I'm going back to school to finish my B.S. in geology next Fall. I'm going to be going to a different university but I'm wondering that if (and I absolutely will) perform well, as in get all A's in my remaining classes, do you think a master's program would consider me? My dream is to get my PhD but I'm sure with such a poor record they won't even consider taking me. Thanks everyone!
  20. Greetings GC'ers: I am preparing to submit my application for a MPP, and am seeking feedback on my drafted addendum. I have seven years of high level policy experience in Congress since my undergrad, which in addition to superb recommendations and essays, I hope will offset a truly abysmal GPA (3.0). I would appreciate any recommendations that you might have for how to strengthen what I have included here. Thanks! I would like to provide the Admissions Committee additional context about my academic performance. Sadly, at the onset of the 2009 fall semester, my mother was diagnosed with terminal cancer. For much of my life my mother raised me on her own, which made her diagnosis particularly traumatic for me. Throughout my senior year at XXX, I worked closely with my professors to ensure that I would receive sufficient credit to graduate, however, I set aside many of my academic and extracurricular goals in order to spend time with my family. While my transcript may not indicate my aptitude or knowledge of public policy, I trust that my resume and references speak to my facility. What my transcript does not convey is the personal growth that I underwent as I managed my mother’s medical care, my coursework, and leadership responsibilities. In retrospect, I remain extremely proud of my decision to continue my studies during this difficult time, despite its impact on my academic record. Not only was I able to spend cherished time with my mother, but I gained valuable insight into how to successfully manage multiple commitments, relationships, and self-expectations; a tool which I have applied many times throughout my career. Today, I am prepared to continue applying this experience as I pursue my XXX at XXX, and remain eager to persevere in any circumstance to succeed in my career as a civil servant.
  21. I'm trying to finish up my application for Columbia's CSD program and do not know how to format my optional essay. I know I need to discuss my GRE scores (below par) but focus on how my GPA is great and I have a lot of volunteer/work/professional experiences. Should this be a blunt statement? Or should it be put in a nicer way like every other personal statement? Applying to: Columbia, UVA, UNC, Vanderbilt, Pitt, BU, MGH, Kean, NYU
  22. plzletmeintoyourlab

    Are top chemistry graduate schools (phd) possible?

    So this semester, it looks like I am getting my first ever Cs (spectroscopy and physics II). I am super bummed but here are my updated specs and plz let me know what you think. I am a junior chem major, dance minor, math minor I go to a "top 100" R1 public university GPA: 3.3 (3.1 major gpa) -I completed a summer undergraduate research fellowship at my school two summers ago (biochemistry) and I am currently trying to move away from that kind of research. -I completed an NSF-REU this past summer at an R2 university. (Theoretical/computational chemistry) -I have presented my biochemistry research at 1 national conference and 3 regional conferences (will possibly attend another national conference for this) -I have presented my theoretical research at 1 national conference and I plan on presenting it at ACS meeting and potentially another national conference -I have one publication where I am first author (theoretical/computational) in a pretty well-known journal -I have two research mentors that would write me great letters of rec and one professor in quantum chemistry that would also be able to write me a good letter of rec -have not taken gre yet Other things: I'm a big advocate for women in stem and I am on the board of my school's feminist group along with the women in stem group on campus (I dont care too much if this helps me get in, but it might) Before these C's I was hoping to apply to top 10 schools (focusing on theoretical/computational). I'm pretty sure this isn't possible anymore so are top 25 schools doable? Any suggestions? Should I drop out lol
  23. Hi, I am an undergraduate student who attends a decent public university and has a good enough GPA & LSAT score to get into a top law school at my state. I am in a fortunate enough position to not be concerned with how much money I make as long as I make above $40k (as a freelance tutor, I've been making decent amount without much time commitment). I like and am good at writing, reading, speaking, analyzing, teaching, and presenting/defending arguments. Coming from a teaching background, I know that I would love to be a Philosophy professor as well as tackle the challenging process of becoming one. Another aspect of being a professor that appeals to me is not having to be in a service sector where I may experience a lot of stress due to my clients. The only thing that shies me away from this career path is the dismal job prospect, which is between 4~15% for receiving a tenured-track position. Compounding this issue is the fact that I do not want to leave my home city, which makes this 4~15% even slimmer. As for pursuing law, I understand that this process is tough and that the job prospect is not high either–although it is better than that of pursuing professorship. So the question is, should I pursue law or becoming a professor? If law, which field should I pursue or avoid and why? I am open to any field as long as it has a reasonable job prospect and does not entail agonizing stress level (i.e. having to deal with unreasonable customers who refuse to pay or put you through mental hell). Thank you for your insight.
  24. phyanth

    Anth GPA

    So, I'm currently filling out applications and one of the schools is asking for my anthropology gpa from undergrad. Now, are they asking the GPA of my anth classes (which would rock)?? or the gpa of my major (which would suck)?
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