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Found 6 results

  1. Hey guys! I hope you're all well. After I finish my undergrad in a years time, I'm really keen on doing a masters in political science focusing on International relations and American politics. I'm from Europe and hoping to do my masters in Columbia Uni. I know our education system is different to the American one so I was wondering what the work load is like as a grad student especially for people attending Columbia? How many hours of classes do you have a week and how many essays do you have a week? If one is organised and dedicated is it all manageable? What are your assignments like? I saw that the writing sample to apply is 30 pages and the longest essay I've written has been 8 so I was wondering if that was the norm in American universities. Thank you so much in advance!
  2. When I was in undergrad, I felt like time went by so fast and 4 years is just a blink of an eye. Do you guys feel the same way in grad school (especially in PhD programs)? How is it different or the same?
  3. Hello: I am going to get a little personal here, and ask if it is rude to ask prospective advisors or professors to get coffee with you; wit all of the controversy surrounding work place professionalism, and the possibility that it might be seen as favoritism, would asking an advisor or professor in a department you want to apply for to get coffee with you, be rude? Would it be unethical? Would it create conflict between you and other members of the department? I ask, since I am hoping to visit schools at some point within the next year, and while there, if I meet any professors who might be keen on talking further, I could go on Yelp and find someone to communicate with. For those who might suggest same-sex professor might be better (I am a cis-woman), I find that hetero-normative, and since I'm bi, the problems of it becoming a date (or it being seen as one), would still be problematic. I guess to put it bluntly: I know that some people have this ideology that if your working, your working: your not there to socialize, but I am not one of those people. And unfortunately with this hyper-professional environment, the lines get blurred when people try to be kind and communicate in a friendly manner, and people assume you have some romantic interest in them (when you don't). For those who feel more comfortable, DM (direct messages), are accepted. Thank you, Poppy
  4. Need help with deciding on schools! I'm still waiting to hear back from other SLP programs, but so far I've been accepted to NYU's ~3-year program and UOP's accelerated 24-month program. For tuition alone, they're basically the same and I really like both programs. Stockton doesn't seem all that fun (but you can correct me if I'm wrong on that), and the idea of going to grad school in NYC is really appealing to me since it's my last chance to study out-of-state in a vibrant place with tons of places to explore, but idk if that makes up for the bad weather, noisy streets, expensive rent & food, not having a car, and being away from friends and family for 3 years. I know the cons of going to NYU really seem to outweigh the pros, but what do you guys think? Is experiencing life in NYC all that great? Would grad school leave me no time to even explore (and so location wouldn't really matter in that sense)? If I go out-of-state, how feasible is it to get licensed and employed (especially in a medical setting) back in CA? Any sort of insight, as well as info for either program, would be appreciated!
  5. Hi all! I have a stupid question about a matter that I don't usually care about: clothing. I am going to start a PhD in History at Cambridge (it doesn't matter where) and I was wondering if I have to start wearing different clothes to look more professional, to care more about what I wear. I don't dress in a bad way but usually, I don't put too much effort into it. From what I recall from my MSc in Edinburgh, people in UK seems more relaxed on the subject than in Italy. Any thoughts?
  6. Hi everyone! So I was in this general biomedical sciences program last fall. I did a few lab rotations but then took medical leave for some health issues. Now I want to return to the program and am looking for labs again. The only lab I could say I kind of liked has a few issues. The research topic was interesting, although not my top interest. However, I am willing to accept that due to lack of labs that are a better fit. The real problem though, is that the lab is horribly disorganized. The PI is around 9-5, and she MUST leave at 5 pm to pick up her small kids from school. She sometimes brings them back to with her to the lab if she really has something important to come back for. She takes a very long time to reply to emails, and keeps telling us to remind her of the things that need to be done. If we don't, she does tend to forget (twice she even forgot to show up to classes she was supposed to teach). The lab is very heavily dependent on the one and only postdoc who works there (he actually works in two labs simultaneously). He does a lot of the bookkeeping, a lot of the planning, a lot of the reminding, and a lot of reproofing other lab members (basically a soon-to-graduate MS student and 2 rotating PhD students) because he thinks we are all not professional enough. And he has a point, because so much money and time gets wasted in the lab because of the carelessness of lab members. There was a post-bac trainee who just left one day and never showed up again. There were two other PhD students who also left "unexpectedly" (according to the PI) and due to mental health issues (according to the MS student). The PI is actually aware of these shortcomings. She explicitly told me that her lab is going through a hard time due to lack of members, and that it is not usually that way. She said that if I am interested, I could rotate again in the lab when things have been sorted out. Almost a year after, according to the MS student, things have not been sorted out. I must say that when she is around, she is a very good mentor and trainer too. She seems to be very passionate about her job and very dedicated. She spent about 2-3 hours with me and the other rotating student on our first day to explain her topic and research methods and techniques. She also spent a good amount of time showing us how to perform some of the experiments herself. She has the reputation of being a very tough committee member and that she grills the students about every last detail. I had to leave the program myself for my own issues, but still kept this lab in mind as an option. One professor from a different department but a related field told me to stay away from that lab because he knows how dysfunctional it is and about its failure in retaining students. I described the situation to a postdoc I know from a different field, and he also advised me to stay away. The director of the biomedical sciences program, however, told me that only I can decide. If I see that the lab is a good fit for me, then I should go for it. He said he has nothing against the PI as a researcher or mentor. He also told me that when he was looking for a lab, he ended up in a place everyone advised him against, but now thinks that he couldn't have made a better decision. Sorry guys for the long post, but I am really lost and need some advice. If I don't join this lab, I am thinking of moving to other universities where perhaps I can find a lab that better matches my research interests and doesn't have so many issues. But what if I fall into the same problem again? What if the labs I'm interested in turn out to be not so great IRL? Or what if I don't get along with the PI for whatever reason? I would be grateful for any input
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