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Found 84 results

  1. NATO Internship

    Hello - has anyone out there applied to the 2012 NATO internship program? We're supposed to hear back about whether or not we've been shortlisted by September. Has anyone done a NATO internship? If so, what's your background?
  2. IR PhD profile evaluation

    Hi everyone I am an International Student (India) applying to several political science PhD for Fall 2018. I am looking to get some opinion on the probability of getting into the colleges selected Here is my profile: Undergrad GPA: 6.64 (around 3.9 after conversion) Grad GPA: 3.67 Research Experience: MA these , not published Research Interests: IR sub-field, International Political Economy TOEFL: 100 GRE: v 155 q 159 awa 4 Colleges UC Santa Barbara Princeton MIT NYU Indiana University Syracuse Cornell
  3. Hi! I'm an American student looking at LSE for a taught MSc in IR. I was wondering if anyone could tell me about their experiences finding a job in the UK during and/or after graduation. Do most Americans graduate and return to the US for jobs? What kind of networking opportunities are available? Any advice would be extremely helpful! Thanks!
  4. Hi there! I'm looking at UChicago's public policy programs and I'm confused about the distinction between two of their options. They offer the MPP through the Harris school with a Global Conflict policy area or an MAIR through the Committee on International Relations with the option of applying for a dual MAPP degree through Harris. I'm interested in international policy and have been primarily looking at MPP programs before entering the workforce (likely in either the non-profit or public sector). My initial concerns with the two programs (and why I'm asking for a differentiation) is that the MPP won't focus on international policy enough to be worth it whereas the MA/MA dual degree is more geared towards individuals seeking a PhD program in the future (which I am not). If anyone has some insight into either or both programs from a student or applicant's perspective, that would be appreciated!
  5. Hey guys, I'm going to be starting my application for my Master's program soon. My first choice is Carleton's NPSIA. I thought I'd start a thread this year so if anyone else is going to apply as well, we can go on this tumultuous journey together. I'm an international student, so the processes and such may be different and requirements more extensive, but I'm sure we can all find some commonality. And also benefit from discussion.
  6. Heyya! I've been recently accepted at MGIMO (Moscow State Institute of International Relation) into an international program. I thought it would be nice to find other people to get to know each other before we come together in September :). Is there anyone? Either accepted or already well into their Masters' programs, Russian or English or dual or whatever? I'd LOVE to hear from you
  7. I am seeking advice for the Master's programs at University of Chicago CIR (Committee on International Relations) and at Columbia University (Political Science). I originally applied to the PhD programs in PoliSci but was transferred to these 1-year MA programs. I received 2 PhD offers from rank 40/50 schools and decided to decline in order to increase my chances of better placement in the next cycle for PhD. My field of interest is International Relations with geographic emphasis on East Asia (esp. China, Korean peninsula) - security studies. So far I have a break-down of the pros/cons of each program: Chicago CIR PROS Received $42k funding for tuition POI: John Mearsheimer, Bruce Cumings, Dali Yang Program admissions committee is highly responsive.. I appealed for additional fellowship and was granted MA Thesis that can be used for writing sample in next PhD app Lower cost of living, esp. with fellowship CONS Not too many faculty in IR - East Asia focused faculty mainly in history or CP Not really a con, but I am told that UChicago (while very good rep in field) is not quite as high as Columbia Columbia PS PROS Ivy League institution, high rep in field (as I am told by grad students/profs/etc) POI: Robert Jervis, Jack Snyder NYC is preferred city for me personally Program is specifically Political Science CONS NO fellowship.. tuition combined with cost of living/other student fees will be approx. $73k to my understanding, NO required MA thesis Higher cost of living than Chicago Granted, I did not visit Columbia as they are rolling admissions and do not have a specific Admit Day or similar event. I did attend CIR's Campus Day and was thoroughly impressed by the helpful preceptors, grad students, etc. To be completely honest I am highly tempted by the name of Columbia but my ultimate goal is placement into a PhD program ranked top 20-25. Also, while my parents are helping me with grad school tuition, 73K is no joke compared to the fellowship I received from Chicago. If anyone has any advice for me, or if anyone has graduated from either of the programs please let me know, would greatly appreciate it. Thank you!!
  8. Type of Undergrad: Top 5 Chinese university with top 2 econ&poli sci departments in the countryMajor: EconomicsUndergrad GPA: 3.51Type of Grad: Top 2 IR programs in the US, strong econ focusGrad GPA: 3.83GRE: 169 V, 167 Q, 4.5 WAny Special Courses: Grad-level - Econometrics, Applied Econometrics (Cross-Sectional), Advanced International Macroeconomics, and a series of China studies coursesLikely Letters of Recommendation: One from program advisor (a highly renowned, though policy-oriented China expert, whom I worked with as an RA for one year); one from another professor in China field (got an A and impressed her with the final paper); one from undergraduate econ professor (co-authored two econ papers)Research Experience: One year RA in China studies as metioned above; three published dissertations in Chinese journals (one pure econ, one political economy, one political theory)Research Interests: Comparative, Chinese politics, Methodology Quantitative Skills: STATA, SPSS, planning to learn R before application Other: Currently working in China to fulfill a two-year home residency requirement stipulated by the scholarship I received for graduate studies (working in the financial industry, completely irrelavent to poli sci); will have two-year full-time work experience plus several professional internships presented on CV by 18Fall My main concerns: 1. Professional rather than truly academic training at grad school, as well as several years of work experience in non-academic/politics areas: will these hurt my chances and should I use a full section in SOP to stress on the explanation? 2. Writing sample: choose between several course papers during graduate years (better polished and formatted, but few quant method applied) and the undergraduate thesis (published, with basic econometric analysis, but the methodology could be somewhat flawed if it was subjected to greater scrutiny) Any thoughts/comments/advice would be much appreciated!
  9. Hoping to get feedback on the two schools I'm considering for an MA in International Relations this fall 2017. I was admitted into the University of Mississippi's MA program with a teaching/research assistantship and stipend. I was also admitted to University of Kentucky's Patterson School with in-state tuition plus $7500 scholarship for the year subject to review for the third/final semester. That would make Patterson approx $23,000 more expensive total, although it's a higher-ranked school. I'm pretty sure I want to continue on to a PhD in political science, and my assistantship at Ole Miss would allow me to study under a professor and publish, whereas at Patterson, it's less likely because the focus of the program is more on the application of political science in the working world. I'm not sure which to weigh more heavily for helping my chances of being admitted to a high-ranking PhD program: the higher ranked Patterson MA program or the opportunity to do research and publish at Ole Miss. Thoughts? Advice? Thank you--
  10. Hello, I am an undergraduate student in Canada and am planning on applying to UK graduate programs in International Relations in Fall (September) 2017. I wanted to ask what programs have the greatest prestige, best opportunities for careers in academia, careers in policy, and foreign service that I could receive entry into. I finished my third year with a CGPA of 3.78/4.00, have experience working in the Canadian embassy in D.C as a Trade Policy intern, worked in a Fortune 500 company, President of my university's Pre-Law Society, and was a Poli Sci instructional assistant at my university. I also have 3 solid reference letters. My top programs are: 1. The London School of Economics & Political Science - International Relations 2. University of Oxford - International Relations 3. University of Cambridge - International Relations 4. Kings College London - International Relations (War Studies Department) 5. University of Edinburgh - International Relations
  11. Hello, I am a political science undergrad student at a comprehensive university in Ontario, Canada. I currently possess a cumulative GPA of 3.78/4.00 and a major GPA of 3.91/4.00. I recently (two days ago) finished my 3rd out of 4 years of university and will be applying in September/October of 2017 with the marks I have already attained. I have work experience as a teaching and grading IR assistant at my university (going to be 8 months), as a trade policy intern at the Canadian Embassy in Washington, DC (4 months), as a legal intern for a prestigious international law firm (1 month), and as a Corporate Affairs intern at a Fortune 500 company (4 months). In terms of university extracurriculars I am the President of my university's pre-law society. I also have three strong letters of recommendation from my professors who specialize in IR--they attended St. Andrews, UofT, and UCambridge respectively. My dream MSc program is The London School of Economics & Political Science MSc International Relations. As an aside, it is my goal to pursue a PhD and a career in academia after completing this program. I wanted to know (from individuals who have been accepted/rejected to this program or similar) what my chances are of being accepted? I am also applying to the MSc in Conflict Studies (second choice) so an estimate of my chances for that program would be most appreciated as well. Canadian LSE MSc Minimum GPA entry requirement: 3.3/4.0 (No GRE or GMAT required) 2017/2018 MSc International Relations acceptance rate: 11.14% (101/907) 2017/2018 MSc Conflict Studies acceptance rate: 17.14% (55/321)
  12. Is there hope for me?

    Hello everyone, it's good to meet you all. I am new here, and as a third year political science undergrad, I am not quite at the point that many of you are. My academic career and been fairly rocky, but it is my dream and goal to get into a master's degree program for political science, and international relations specifically. I have a deep interest in East Asia and the political dynamics between the East Asian states. The purpose of this post is to find out if there is any hope for me to get into graduate school. I began university at the University of Alberta in Fall 2014 as a physics major in the department of science (don't even ask). After crashing and burning with a couple of D's, an F and W or two, I moved into the political science program (which had been my plan to begin with). I immediately started pulling much better grades in my second year, and was asked if I would be interested in the honours program in political science. This would have been a great opportunity, but I soon after discovered I was ineligible. The program required a B average in all PolS courses taken, and I had received a C in PolS 101 during my first year as a physics major. Since then, I have continued on the regular political science path, and aim to graduate in 2019. Currently, my overall GPA is about 3.4, and I will work to bring this up as I distance myself from my disastrous foray into the sciences. My fourth year is nearly entirely political science courses, so I intend to do better than I have in the past. Now I do not aim to be accepted into any Ivy League schools, but I would like to get into a decent Master's program in international relations. I have proficiency in the Japanese language, and have been investigating international relations programs at the University of Tokyo and Waseda University in Japan. These would be my top picks, as they allow me to be immersed in Japan, which will help my future research interests. I am concerned that since I am not enrolled in the honours program, which would normally allow one to prepare an undergraduate thesis, this will cause issues for me down the road. What are my chances, and what can I do to salvage my academic career? Thanks!
  13. I am a third year student studying in a comprehensive university in Ontario, Canada. I currently possess a GPA of 10.7/12 (roughly 3.85 or 87%). I have experience working in the Canadian Embassy in Washington, D.C, in a Fortune 500 Mutual Fund Company, and President of my school's Student Union Pre-Law Society. It has always been my dream to move to the U.K (I am a British passport holder) and continue my PhD there in the future. That being said, I wanted to know whether I am competitive for these Masters programs: 1. MA War Studies, Kings College London 2. MSc International Relations, University of Cambridge 3. MSc International Relations, The London School of Economics & Political Science Thank you for taking the time to reply! Thank you!
  14. Hello everyone, im currently deciding between a few options for grad school fall 2017 start and would love your opinions. I have been accepted into the following programs: LSE MSc In Global Politics Sciences Po MSc In Public policy iheid (graduate institute in Geneva) in international affairs and have also applied to the dual degree between LSE sciences po (Psia) ... haven't heard back yet but assuming I get in, which of the four options would you choose? For some background, I went to undergrad in the US and majored in comparative literature so I am a bit of a crossover case for these programs. I honestly am not sure what I want to do, so I'd love to go to a school with excellent career services and obviously high quality courses. Since I was previously studying literature and science (as I was planning to go to med school in the us) I am a bit concerned about finding work after my masters since I have no work experience. let me know your thoughts!! thanks a bunch!
  15. American SIS or Syracuse Maxwell

    Hello everyone, I've been lurking this forum throughout this past application cycle, and it's truly proved incredibly helpful as I applied. All of you have different backgrounds and perspectives, and I thought it would be helpful to hear from the people who probably went through or are going through the same thing as me. I applied to a few IR programs, and I'm waiting to hear back from a few more. But as of right now I am in between American SIS and Syracuse Maxwell, both from which I have received acceptances. I applied to Maxwell's IR program, and to SIS' International Peace and Conflict Resolution program. American was my top choice because my main research goal is in conflict resolution, and the program would allow me to take coursework in more specific interests of mine such as culture and gender. However, I have received no funding from American. While Maxwell's program isn't in conflict resolution, their IR program offers Peace, Security, and Conflict as a career track to specialize in. More importantly, they have offered me a tuition scholarship and graduate assistantship totaling $51,000. I have no loans from undergrad, and I was expecting to take out loans for my Masters. But I wasn't expecting to receive such a generous amount from Syracuse. If I was between American and Syracuse with no money from either school, I would have chosen American. But interestingly enough receiving aid is what is making this decision complicated. I am looking into specific stats of what percentage of alumni ended up in what sector and what positions they're in, as in that's the best way of really gauging how worthwhile a degree from a school is. But I was curious in knowing what all of your experiences were when having to decide between two schools. American is in DC, which is the ideal place to be for IR. However, with the way Syracuse's program is set up, I could do the summer and last semester of the program in DC as well, which works out nicely. If there was anyone who could provide me with some insight on American's alumni networks versus Syracuse's alumni networks in the field, I would greatly appreciate it. I've heard a lot about the "Maxwell Mafia" but I wanted to see if anyone has any insight to offer on the Syracuse alumni network versus American's in the arena of non-profit and government work. I know that this should be an easy answer (pick Syracuse), especially since I want to work in the non-profit sector therefore taking out more loans than I need isn't smart. But I wanted to consider every single thing before I made my decision. Is it even worth considering the $80,000 debt for the ideal location and better ranking of American SIS? American is a better fit for me in terms of coursework, research interests, and location. More professors in the program have the same exact specialization as I hope to have. But Syracuse has it's global internships and Maxwell in Washington, and it's the shorter program (16 months instead of 24 months), as well as the aid. If anyone could share their main priorities to consider when stuck between two grad schools, and how they maneuvered through that decision, I will truly appreciate it!
  16. I got accepted to Berkeley’s Master of Development Practice and Johns Hopkins’ SAIS DC. I graduated from UC Berkeley in 2015 with a degree in Environmental Economics and Policy. Though I haven’t had relevant professional work experience, I attended community college meanwhile to take classes for my own interest. Berkeley’s tuition is about $48k/year and offers small funding ($3k/year) while SAIS DC’s tuition is about $47k/year with no funding. Cost of living in DC and SF bay area are similar. I know UC Berkeley very well and it seems like I may have some advantage getting campus jobs that I may be able to graduate debt-free. While these two programs are not exactly the same, they will help my career goal, which is to work in international organizations focusing on Latin America in the long-run. Here are pros and cons I see from each school: Berkeley Pros: Campus jobs that will help me financially Bigger campus, more departments such as ERG and Latin American studies Fellowship opportunities for the second year Cons: I spent 4 years there. I am not sure if there’s much I can get out of this school. But Berkeley is a big school and being a graduate student is different from undergrad. So I’m not sure if it’s a big con. SAIS: Pros: Being in DC SAIS is more known and prestigious than MDP. Emphasis on quant skills Cons: I have no clue how I can minimize student loan (or if possible at all). What do you think? I would like to get some advice from others.
  17. I'm a current MA student at Stanford's International Policy Studies (IPS) program and want to extend a warm congratulations to admitted students! I know decision-making can be tough; I remember being in your shoes last year. If you or any potential applicants for next year have any questions, you can post them here. I can also put you in touch with a current student whose interests align with yours.
  18. Hey all! I have gotten a lot of positive responses for grad school and I am a fortunate position to have options. While I am still waiting on responses from a few more schools (University of Minnesota and University College London), I would like to hash out some of my current choices. I have been accepted to both Brandeis and Syracuse. Brandeis has offered me a 60% tuition scholarship that can be renewed during the 2-year program, whereas Syracuse has offered me a $36,000 scholarship for the 2017-2018 school year. Brandeis is obviously the more expensive choice here, but which program would be overall more beneficial to entering the humanitarian aid/social development career track? Brandeis is an official international development Master's, whereas I would have to gain a concentration in international development and humanitarian aid at Syracuse. Syracuse has a required two semesters off-campus, international internship requirement, while Brandeis has it as a second-year option (and is often done domestically). Can anyone provide a secondary insight?
  19. Hi everyone! I've recently received admissions notifications for grad school and decided to turn to The Grad Cafe for help and/or input in deciding which school I should attend. Hopefully i get some feedback soon, considering the deadline is on April 15! Anyway, a little background on myself. I am a 23 year old female person from Malaysia. Got my Bachelor's in International Relations from Boston University (Class of 2015) and am currently working as a researcher at a foreign policy think tank in my country. Hoping to go back to grad school this Fall 2017. I applied to all IR MA programs, 6 in total, and all 6 accepted me. The 6 schools and programs are: Columbia SIPA (MIA) Johns Hopkins SAIS (MA) University of Denver Josef Korbel School (MA in Intl Human Rights) George Washington Elliott School (MA in Global Communication) UT Austin LBJ School (MGPS) Tufts Fletcher (MALD) I honestly did not expect to get into all 6 programs, which is why I am having trouble deciding. I've created an Excel spreadsheet to look over all the relevant details in order to help me make the best choice but what do you guys think are the programs I should give more weight to? All of the programs i've applied to are of the international human rights/humanitarian policy with a global communications/public service/policy orientation. I like these programs because they are all interdisciplinary and most emphasize on practical applications of knowledge rather than theoretical. For example, rather than complete an MA thesis, some of these programs require Capstones or practical internships instead. My weaknesses are economics and numbers. Some of these schools have also offered me scholarships/fellowships - the only two who haven't are SIPA and SAIS. What i'm taking into consideration when picking schools/programs are mainly cost of attendance, scholarship/fellowship offered, reputation/ranking and cost of living (since i'm guessing i'd most probably have to live off campus, self housing). Prior to receiving admissions notices, I had my own personal choice ranking but now, some of it has shifted. For example, NYC cost of living alone is a number that i am not sure I would be able to afford (let alone cost of attendance of 80k per year) so Columbia has moved down slightly on my list. I am going to apply to government scholarships from my country that would cover cost of living etc, everything total but the problem is i have to make a commitment to a school soon and scholarships here generally have 3-4 rounds of interviews so it might not work out in my favor soon enough. That's pretty much the basic gist of it! Looking forward to any and all input, opinions, first hand knowledge and experiences that you guys can offer!
  20. SAIS vs Chicago CIR

    Hey all, Just got accepted to both SAIS and CIR for a masters in IR. 1/3 funding at Chicago, nothing at SAIS. I'm willing to go pretty deep in debt for either, though. Too shocked that I got into either to think clearly about my choice right now, so I could use some input: I know that for policy focused programs, SAIS is near unbeatable. However, I think I'm more interested in research/academia for a career, and I want to know which program would set me up better if I choose to go for a Phd. I'm also interested in working for a FoPo think tank like the Atlantic Council or Brookings. I'm attracted to Chicago because I enjoy the theoretical side of IR and that seems to be their focus (also, Mearsheimer). However, SAIS is better ranked as an MA program (although that's for "policy programs"), and I feel like I could keep my options open career wise. Any insights? Also, before someone says CIR "isn't worth it" for future Phd, I'm coming from a no name undergrad school with no work experience. I seriously doubt my chances getting into a top tier Phd program direct from UG, or getting an even halfway decent job given the low name recognition of my UG institution, which is why I want a big name MA.
  21. Hey! I was secretly hoping only one of these schools wouldn't accept me because I absolutely hate making decisions. Obviously, I am going to do a little bit of research again before I decide but I wanted to know if other people had any advice. I got into: Boston University - MA International Relations and Environmental Policy (with a tiny bit of $) American University - MA Global Environmental Policy (no funding) I want to try to make my concentration centered around wildlife conservation. I want to work in a place like the World Wildlife Fund or something similar. My problem is, which is actually the best school for international relations/environmental policy? BU - offers flexibility with the program. I can take classes in any of the departments meaning I can take wildlife biology or something like that along with my IR and EP classes. It's also a well-known school. (other reasons: I have family there, know the area, friends are here, etc.) AU - it's in the middle of Washington D.C. basically where all of my dream organizations to work are based. The center of policy, but I'm not sure if I will be able to get any sort of wildlife conservation concentration there. (other: It also might be cheaper to live here with my dog if I'm being honest.) These are just the bare bones, but I don't really know how to compare these schools yet. It was always a tie for me. More people know what Boston University is, so that's something I'm taking into consideration. I'm also applying to the Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey, so if I get in there that's an even bigger decision on my hands.
  22. Hi gradcafe, I am an international student looking to eventually land on an R1 university for an IR Ph.D. in the US. (It is partly because in my place a US phd is strongly preferred for academic positions) I am now in my senior year in a university in Hong Kong majoring Economics (top40 in QS ranking, but I doubt that matters). My GPA will be around 3.05 upon graduation. It is low because I was directionless and wasted too much time on other things in my first 2.5 years in university, plus my university actively deflates student grades. I have just had a GRE test and the score (V/Q/AW): 151/165/4.0, just for reference. I have accepted an offer and will be going to study an MA in International Relations at the University of Warwick this year. While I will work hard to have a better GPA to compensate for my undergrad one, i am not sure about what to do after, to boost my profile enough to enter an R1 phd. There are three options i could think of: Go for a mphil in political science in the UK/Europe. I will surely benefit from a 2-year research training but I am afraid I would be further driven away from the US. Apply for jobs in think tanks/ intergovernmental organizations and work for 1/2 years. This is a favorable option since I could work on international issues in the real world setting (and possibly get paid for it), but i am not sure on whether i could actually land on these jobs. Apply for a master in the US. With my postgrad degree result, I should be able to get in a master programme like the Uchi one.(Not sure) The problem is that it is expensive (course fee and living costs) and costs me 2-year. I am still planning on it and prefer 1/2 over 3. However these are still vague ideas and any suggestion/criticism would be really helpful. Thank you!
  23. Hello, would appreciate thoughts regarding graduate school decisions/comments from people in the same boat. Interested in the Middle East, development, and human rights. I have State Dept. experience and did some volunteer NGO work in Lebanon. Accepted to: Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey - International Policy and Development MA program ($14k fellowship over 2 years) George Washington University - Middle East Studies MA program, concentration in International Affairs and Development ($5k/year fellowship) - waiting on another fellowship that would fully fund 1st year. Fletcher at Tufts University - MALD program ($24k fellowship over 2 years) SAIS at Johns Hopkins University - MA program, no funding still waiting on a decision from the Ford School at University of Michigan (MPP program). SAIS was my #1 because I wanted to strengthen my economic/quant skills.. took an online econ course to prepare and started to reconsider haha, and the $0 funding doesn't help. Fletcher seems up my alley with their human rights rep, and they gave me the most funding, but they're also more expensive than GWU and don't have the DC advantage. Michigan would probably be my top choice if I get accepted because of in-state tuition. Their MPP is ranked 3rd after Berkely and HKS, and they offer several international-oriented courses so I'd still walk away with the skills and expertise that I want. Middlebury is great but can't compare with the other schools, especially considering I will still have to take out significant loans to go there, so it's probably out of the running. I prefer to be abroad post-graduation, and am also considering going the PhD route at some point in the future, so I'd like to be somewhere where I could do an MA thesis. and with that I welcome any thoughts/advice
  24. Hi everyone! I've recently received admissions notifications for grad school and decided to turn to The Grad Cafe for help and/or input in deciding which school I should attend. Hopefully i get some feedback soon, considering the deadline is on April 15! Anyway, a little background on myself. I am a 23 year old female person from Malaysia. Got my Bachelor's in International Relations from Boston University (Class of 2015) and am currently working as a researcher at a foreign policy think tank in my country. Hoping to go back to grad school this Fall 2017. I applied to all IR MA programs, 6 in total, and all 6 accepted me. The 6 schools and programs are: Columbia SIPA (MIA) Johns Hopkins SAIS (MA) University of Denver Josef Korbel School (MA in Intl Human Rights) George Washington Elliott School (MA in Global Communication) UT Austin LBJ School (MGPS) Tufts Fletcher (MALD) I honestly did not expect to get into all 6 programs, which is why I am having trouble deciding. I've created an Excel spreadsheet to look over all the relevant details in order to help me make the best choice but what do you guys think are the programs I should give more weight to? All of the programs i've applied to are of the international human rights/humanitarian policy with a global communications/public service/policy orientation. I like these programs because they are all interdisciplinary and most emphasize on practical applications of knowledge rather than theoretical. For example, rather than complete an MA thesis, some of these programs require Capstones or practical internships instead. My weaknesses are economics and numbers. Some of these schools have also offered me scholarships/fellowships - the only two who haven't are SIPA and SAIS. What i'm taking into consideration when picking schools/programs are mainly cost of attendance, scholarship/fellowship offered, reputation/ranking and cost of living (since i'm guessing i'd most probably have to live off campus, self housing). Prior to receiving admissions notices, I had my own personal choice ranking but now, some of it has shifted. For example, NYC cost of living alone is a number that i am not sure I would be able to afford (let alone cost of attendance of 80k per year) so Columbia has moved down slightly on my list. I am going to apply to government scholarships from my country that would cover cost of living etc, everything total but the problem is i have to make a commitment to a school soon and scholarships here generally have 3-4 rounds of interviews so it might not work out in my favor soon enough. That's pretty much the basic gist of it! Looking forward to any and all input, opinions, first hand knowledge and experiences that you guys can offer!
  25. Hello, all! I'm currently an IR grad student at an APSIA school outside the US. As an American, I didn't really want to pay exorbitant tuition fees for a graduate program when I can gain international experience at a lower cost to boot with my masters abroad. I'll be finishing my requirements in the middle of this year, but I have the option of continuing my studies for another year at a top 10 FP school to gain a dual degree in IR. So, basically, I'll have 2 IR degrees from abroad and in the US. My concern is this: For my IR degree here, I basically paid roughly ~$10k/year for my 2 year program. The partner institution will rake me about ~$37k/year for a 1 year continuation of my program. That's almost 4x the price of my degree here. Is it worth having 2 IR degrees--from one being abroad with most likely very, very, very little name recognition and from one being a top 10 FP school? I'm afraid of being viewed as a "degree collector", which is not really my intention. I just feel that the US school would help me get my foot in the door. To be honest, my current school isn't really doing much for networking as they leave us to fend for ourselves. I should also add that I'm not completely solid about staying in the US for work and would be very open--maybe even prefer--to working abroad.