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Found 118 results

  1. So, TL;DR deadline day is coming up for me to choose on Sol Price at SC for my MPA or do my MA IR at NYU. SC will be slightly cheaper, but price isn’t a big factor to me as much as career prospects. From posting over at r/gradschool and a couple other forums it seems like MPA is more in demand and offers more diverse options, but I’m not sure. I want to go into politics longterm, but want to lecture at the uni level in the interim, which would require a PhD. Right now the real hold up is being worried whether or not I’d be able to do a PhD in IR without a masters in the field. Also public transport in LA is obviously really bad so that presents a bit of an issue. But I’m pretty much 98 percent committed to SC as I feel head to head, the MPA would be better to have over the MA in case things don't work out with applying for/doing a PhD. I would still be able to work in governmental consulting and the like. Another concern I have is whether or not I would still be able to work for the UN or do international work with an MPA. I know that Ban Ki-Moon, the former Sec General of the UN has an MPA, but other than that, I am not sure. I would really appreciate some advice. Background- MA linguistics Glasgow uni.
  2. josiewebb923

    NATO Internship

    Hello - has anyone out there applied to the 2012 NATO internship program? We're supposed to hear back about whether or not we've been shortlisted by September. Has anyone done a NATO internship? If so, what's your background?
  3. Hello all, I need some advice. I am doing a PhD in Cold War History and after finishing my dissertation I intend to seek a second PhD in IR in the United States. My age is under 30 and my background is the following: -BA at a University in Southern Europe. -MA in Contemporary History at the same University (grade is 10/10). -PhD Candidate in Contemporary History at the same University. Archival research in many archives in the US, UK, Brussels and elsewhere. Visiting Researcher with full funding at top UK University. Fulbright Visiting Researcher at Columbia, sponsored by a top political scientist. I have published three book chapters and I work on two papers. I speak two foreign languages. I have no quantitative skills and have not taken the GRE yet. I am interested in doing research on China's foreign policy and security and I will try to take language courses in China. I would like to apply to: Columbia, UPenn and University of Michigan. I would love to work with Iain Johnston, but I consider Harvard impossible. Could anyone give me any honest feedback and/or useful advice? Thank you in advance!
  4. Hey, so I'm having a hard time choosing between Tufts University MALD, Columbia MIA, and George Washington SPS. I was hoping someone could give me some advice after hearing my reasoning + pros & cons because I feel stressed with the upcoming enrollment deposit deadlines. Thank you in advance~ Context About Me - I have a fellowship that offers me financial assistance, 2 great internships with the government, and a job straight after graduation in the government. So, technically I don't HAVE to be in DC because I have that fellowship that will make me end up in DC for the summers anyway for my internship. I'm from Texas... so I need information about the city too. I've had an internship in DC before, so honestly, DC is the only one I'm familiar with the area, but I've never visited GW. I visited Tufts for a day, and I really liked it, but again, I don't know Boston. Personal, but I'm a Christian, so I'm gonna be attending a church and need Christian clubs on campus to help keep me sane lol I'm South Asian heritage... so I need some diversity to make me feel not alone I'm 21 (will be 22 as I start grad school), so it makes me wary since I'm also super young and entering grad school Columbia - Pros: I like the program? It's an Ivy League Cons: Honestly the biggest negative for me right now is the cost of tuition & cost of living in NYC. I like the program on paper (looking into the International and Security Policy concentration as well as Management specialization), but I don't know if it's worth the debt at the end. I'm appealing for more money, but SIPA didn't offer me additional financial aid in addition to my external fellowship... that means I would need to pay 40k a year. Is it worth the debt? I mean I have a guaranteed job in government after college, so is the name/Ivy League status helpful for someone who already is going to be in the government after college? I've never visited either... I've been to NY before, but I've never seen the campus. Tufts - Pros: I like the size of the school where you can get to know everyone and can good attention from professors... it'll help with the community aspect. Visiting made me feel good because I got to talk to a couple of students, the admissions dude was nice, and I liked the classes I visited too. I like the ability you have to cross-register and take a few courses at Harvard too for more experience. Cons: I don't know Boston. I'm not good with the cold... so will I survive? It's not DC either, so if I want to do a job to get some experience... it may be hard to find organizations in Boston that are IR/gov related? With my external fellowship + funding Tufts offered me, I only need to pay $5000 per semester if I attend. But, I'm appealing for more because there's no harm in trying. GW - Pros: I am covered in terms of tuition, which would be amazing considering I have undergrad debt I need to pay off. Big school, so lots of clubs and opportunities to connect/find my people? I know DC (from my 1 semester experience there). Night classes only, so it will help if I want to find a job/internship during the day. Cons: Big school, so I don't know if I'd get a small school attention. Never visited, so I don't know if I would like the campus atmosphere and such. I think I'm really wary of grad school life since I haven't experienced it yet. I really don't know how it's gonna be different from undergrad, so I need to really be intentional in finding community/my niche. I guess that's why I'm confused? PLEASE HELP!!!
  5. I got into SAIS but was rejected by their IDEV program. Tufts offered me their Master of Law and Diplomacy program. I also got into the MA program at the Graduate Institute, Geneva. I am leaning toward SAIS because they have a really good China Studies program but the tuition is extremely expensive. I am also a bit worried about their requirement on economic classes since I can't deal with numbers/graphs. My goal is to have a PhD in IR or work in international organizations after my MA. IHEID fits my research interest and has a lot of connections with different organizations, but I'm not sure whether getting a master's in Europe will hurt my chances of coming back to the States for a PhD? Also, IHEID is less known compared to JHU, so as a non-EU citizen, will it be hard for me to find jobs that sponsors a working visa in the field, or finding a job back to the States/Asia? I am a Chinese student attending an undergraduate program in the US. If there's anyone who was also accepted by/has previously attended those programs, or have knowledge about them, please comment with your suggestions. I would really appreciate it. Gracias~
  6. Good Afternoon Everyone! Long time lurker here looking to get advice from random other forum members. I have used the results search a lot to help make my list and applied to 10 schools this year, before being accepted to 9. I feel like I have no bad options going forward but am worried about taking on too much debt for an MPP / IR Master's. After graduating, I plan to work for USAID if possible, although these spots are difficult to get, and those positions pay $70-90k for starting salaries for candidates with Master's degrees. I'm open to other jobs as well but want to aim for that at the moment. I want to study international development and economic policy in school, but would love to integrate a few language classes and GIS coursework in there. I think I have enough money to cover my living expenses but not tuition. I don't have any undergraduate debt. Getting a Master's is something of a career switching option for me. My options at the moment are: SIPA: $40-60k in loans needed Fletcher: $35-55k in loans needed SOAS in London (1 year): $15-20k in loans, depending on one fellowship still pending Vienna Diplomatic Academy: $10k in loans Ford Michigan: $35-55k in loans Carnegie Mellon: $20k in loans UVA Batten: Free Ride UT LBJ: Free Ride and stipend the first year after receiving a language fellowship from UT I think Ford is too expensive, but they will waive tuition if you get a teaching assistant position, which I want to do anyway. I'm leaning towards UVA or UT. SIPA and Fletcher get a lot of flak on this forum and I just don't know if I want to have the mental burden of having that many loans. I can imagine the alumni network is amazing from SIPA and that in twenty years maybe I will be proud that I got a degree from Columbia, but being a student in New York sounds awful to me in many ways. Carnegie Mellon isn't standing out to me although I think they really, really put in the work to build a diverse student body (no application fee, lots of outreach, etc.). I think the program focuses on hard skills, which is a great thing but doesn't have as much flexibility for more traditional area studies. SOAS and the DA would be awesome for the location, but it really is hard to beat free. I know these schools aren't always the most popular or traditional, but I would love to hear y'all's thoughts on these schools and prices. Thank you!
  7. Hey guys! I plan to pursue my Masters in International Relations from the UK. I am completely confused about the University that I should accept an offer from, because the data from the internet is really unreliable and inconsistent. Different rankings provide a different status to different universities. So the inconsistency does not really help. My top choices at the moment (in that order) are: 1) LSE 2) SOAS 3) King's College 4)University of Manchester I hold an offer from all the above universities except LSE. I have applied to many other universities for the same course, so please feel free to include other university suggestions for the course.
  8. I’ve been struggling for weeks with the best choice, and would love some input. Choosing between: SIPA (68k), SAIS Europe (45k), ESIA (42.5k), MSFS (59k), SIS (still waiting on funding info) Criteria: alumni network, abundance of internship opportunities, cohort atmosphere, career services, location (preference for big cities) I’m also concerned about debt. After my savings I’m facing a loan somewhere between 40k and 60k depending on the school. How much debt is good debt for a MA in IR? While I would like to work in non-profit, I know it’s not finanacially smart. Therefore, I’m aiming for a career in consulting. At first I was 100% invested in SAIS Europe, and SAIS (according to most) has a pretty heavy Econ focus which I need for my professional goals. However, the locations of the NY and DC schools are really advantageous. I won’t have to deal with the summer rush to get internships and can have access to those opportunities during the fall and spring. I would say that MSFS is my second top choice, but the distance from the metro as well as overall cost of living in that area are a bit of a drawback. I’m going to try to ask for more funding. Just to see if I can get more and to make my decision easier. Im really unsure about which one I should go for.
  9. I'm deciding on a Masters in international affairs/development studies and would appreciate any advice anyone has. Johns Hopkins seems to be the most prestigious but offered me no funding, and Tufts seems to be of a similar caliber and offered me some funding but is in Boston and I don't have housing there so that would be an additional cost. Does anyone have any insight on the difference between GW and American? They are my most affordable options. I have family in DC so can live rent-free there. Is SAIS at Johns Hopkins worth going into significant debt?
  10. somewhatslightlydazed

    SIPA vs SAIS

    Hi all - hoping for some advice on choosing between SIPA's MIA program and SAIS's MA program. I'm interested in studying human rights and conflict prevention/resolution and I'm hoping to work in an advocacy-based NGO after finishing grad school (though I'm also interested in multilateral work or possibly federal gov work under a different administration). I've visited both schools and overall had great impressions of both, so I'm not sure how to make a final decision. My current pro-con list is below, but I'd love to hear others' thoughts on what I should put the most weight on or if there are other factors I should be considering! Pro-SAIS: I'd get to spend my first year living in Bologna and traveling through Europe and North Africa during breaks, which seems like a really amazing, unique opportunity More tight-knit cohort from spending a year abroad together SAIS seems more prestigious than SIPA, though perhaps only marginally I live in DC now and probably want to continue working here long-term, so having a mostly DC-based network would be useful Their program is smaller than SIPA's and the classes seem smaller in general Pro-SIPA: I got scholarships from both schools, but SIPA will be about $10k cheaper/year* (but I can still afford either with no debt) Being close to the UN and having school connections there would be a great way for me to get internship experience in a multilateral org and figure out if I like the sector Studying in NYC for 2 years would be a great way for me to test out living in the city and see if it's somewhere I'd be interested in living long-term (since most jobs that interest me are in DC or NYC, and I already know what I like and don't like about DC life) Their "human rights and humanitarian policy" concentration perfectly aligns with my career goals (I can study human rights at SAIS, it would just be under the "international law and orgs" concentration so it might be a bit less focused) I could cross-register with Columbia Law School and take courses in international law *Assuming I get the FLAS fellowship, which I find out about next week. If I don't get it, I can't afford SIPA and in that case the decision is easy! Thanks for sharing any thoughts you have 😃
  11. I'm having a very hard time deciding where to study in Europe next year in international affairs. I've been accepted to Cambridge, LSE, Oxford, and Sciences Po but funding, course structure and reputation are weighing on me. I have a BA in International Development and 2 years of relevant work experience (co-op) in foreign policy. After graduate school, I would like to eventually work for the UN, an international organization or the foreign affairs department. Here are my initial thoughts: LSE - MSc IR: no funding, 1 full year, foundational course in IR + courses + 10,000 word dissertation. I have applied to a couple of external scholarships which could offset the higher cost of living, but have heard that it's more of a degree that looks good on paper. Cambridge - MPhil IR: no funding, 10 months, courses + methodology + 25,000 word dissertation. I really like the idea of living on a small campus, not far away from London. Having browsed internet forums I'm not sure about POLIS' reputation. Oxford - MPhil IR: no funding, 2 years, foundational courses, courses + methodology + 30,000 word dissertation. Probably my first choice but I don't have the means to spend 90k on tuition + living expenses for two years esp. given my likely income afterwards. Would I be making a huge mistake in rejecting the offer and going elsewhere? Sciences Po - Int. Security: Partial funding (20,000 euros), 2 years, internship, a ton of courses, already bilingual. i could afford to stay in Paris for two years with the scholarship and it would give me the opportunity to get some more work experience/internships during the summer and fall. Not too sure about the university's reputation and course structure since it seems like there are 8 classes per semester?? Right now, I'm leaning towards Cambridge given the length of the programme and the campus, but also very open to considering LSE or Sciences Po. Grateful for any opinions
  12. Hi everyone! I am 25 years old, I already hold a BA in communication from an italian uni, and a MSc in political sciences from the London School of Economics (LSE). I am currently working in international organizations such as the UN - it's now been almost 2 years. I would like to study again, most likely next year or in 2020, and I always wanted to go to a top tier US university - Harvard being the top choice. The fact is, my family cannot afford to pay me a Master at Harvard uni at the Kennedy School of Government or the GSAS, and as an international student I would never receive financial aid to totally cover the expenses of one of their Master programs. That being said, I still want to go to Harvard, and experience studying in a US university. So I casually found out about Harvard Extension School: a part of Harvard university, that offers special Master degrees (Master of Liberal Arts, AML) in a variety of disciplines, with the possibility to follow partly online an partly on campus, the possibility to take a maximum of 5 years to complete the program, and obviously reduced tuition fees. A Master at GSAS would cost me around 160.000 USD for two years, while a Master of Liberal Arts at Harvard Extension School would cost me a mere 55.000 USD. But admissions to the Harvard Extension School are way easier: you only have to pass a general reading and comprehension test, and then not let your GPA sink below 3.0 to complete the program. You spend half of the program on campus, you also have a final thesis to prepare, and graduate from Harvard during the May commencement ceremony. I am interested in the AML in International Relations (https://www.extension.harvard.edu/academics/graduate-degrees/international-relations-degree), and I already emailed Harvard Extension School for more information, but one thing that is not completely clear to me is: how valuable is such kind of degree for employers? I know many students blatantly lie and pretend they earned a Master of Arts from Harvard instead of a Master of Liberal Arts from Harvard Extension School, and employers, especially in the USA, are annoyed by this kind of behaviour. Let me be clear: I am not doing the program to mislead people into believing I earned a Master of Arts from Harvard Kennedy School of Government or the GSAS. I would just like to experience Harvard and a top US university, pursuing a degree which is more affordable for me and my family, can be completed while working, and that can give me some new skills and knowledge (being a political science graduate, I never took courses in human rights law, public policy law, international development, which I would find in this AML program, really giving some meaningful contirbution to my professional growth). Has any of you ever pursued a Master of Liberal Arts at the Harvard Extension School? Or is there any of you that could provide more information and more advice on the topic? Thank you!
  13. I am seeking advice for the Master's programs at University of Chicago CIR (Committee on International Relations) and at Columbia University (Political Science). I originally applied to the PhD programs in PoliSci but was transferred to these 1-year MA programs. I received 2 PhD offers from rank 40/50 schools and decided to decline in order to increase my chances of better placement in the next cycle for PhD. My field of interest is International Relations with geographic emphasis on East Asia (esp. China, Korean peninsula) - security studies. So far I have a break-down of the pros/cons of each program: Chicago CIR PROS Received $42k funding for tuition POI: John Mearsheimer, Bruce Cumings, Dali Yang Program admissions committee is highly responsive.. I appealed for additional fellowship and was granted MA Thesis that can be used for writing sample in next PhD app Lower cost of living, esp. with fellowship CONS Not too many faculty in IR - East Asia focused faculty mainly in history or CP Not really a con, but I am told that UChicago (while very good rep in field) is not quite as high as Columbia Columbia PS PROS Ivy League institution, high rep in field (as I am told by grad students/profs/etc) POI: Robert Jervis, Jack Snyder NYC is preferred city for me personally Program is specifically Political Science CONS NO fellowship.. tuition combined with cost of living/other student fees will be approx. $73k to my understanding, NO required MA thesis Higher cost of living than Chicago Granted, I did not visit Columbia as they are rolling admissions and do not have a specific Admit Day or similar event. I did attend CIR's Campus Day and was thoroughly impressed by the helpful preceptors, grad students, etc. To be completely honest I am highly tempted by the name of Columbia but my ultimate goal is placement into a PhD program ranked top 20-25. Also, while my parents are helping me with grad school tuition, 73K is no joke compared to the fellowship I received from Chicago. If anyone has any advice for me, or if anyone has graduated from either of the programs please let me know, would greatly appreciate it. Thank you!!
  14. Victoria Carvalho Salles

    Masters In Europe 2018-2019 Cycle

    Anyone applying to any masters in Europe this upcoming cycle? I thought we could discuss it here! I’m applying to Science Po and IHEID.
  15. Hi there, I'm starting the process of applying to grad schools for the Fall 2019 semester. Looking at all DC metro area based schools for IR/ Foreign Policy/ Security related programs. Ideally would be going to American or GW. Wondering how much a few things factor into your application when applying. I'm applying directly out of undergrad decent enough grades (3.3), I haven't taken the GRE yet, I have stunning recommendations, and Teaching assistant (in a related course) experience. The one thing I'm hoping will really set my application apart from other direct from undergrad applicants is my internship experience- I've held 5 political internships during my under-grad career (Will be 7 by the time I graduate). 3 of my internships are direct foreign policy/ IR experience (think tanks & DOD), 3 are in Congress, and one is directly political. Question for those further along in the admissions process- how much good does my experience actually do for my application? Thanks in advance.
  16. Hi! I got accepted to the following programs (all one year) and I can't decide! 1. Master of Arts (MA), The Fletcher School, Tufts University 2. Master of International Public Policy (MIPP), SAIS, Johns Hopkins University 3. Master of Advanced Studies in International Affairs (MAS-IA), GPS, UCSD 4. MSc International Strategy and Diplomacy, LSE My interests are IR, strategy, and security. When I consider location, I think UCSD is attractive but Fletcher and SAIS network are strong! LSE also has a very good program. I don't have to worry about scholarships because my workplace is going to pay for them. I would appreciate if I could get some advice!
  17. Hi guys, I'm graduating May 2019 from a U.S university, and I'm already considering my options for graduate school. I want to live in another country to gain more international experience and learn another language. What are the best MA programs in Europe? (Taught in English) I'm already considering The Graduate Institute at Geneva and Science Po.
  18. irapplicant17

    American SIS or Syracuse Maxwell

    Hello everyone, I've been lurking this forum throughout this past application cycle, and it's truly proved incredibly helpful as I applied. All of you have different backgrounds and perspectives, and I thought it would be helpful to hear from the people who probably went through or are going through the same thing as me. I applied to a few IR programs, and I'm waiting to hear back from a few more. But as of right now I am in between American SIS and Syracuse Maxwell, both from which I have received acceptances. I applied to Maxwell's IR program, and to SIS' International Peace and Conflict Resolution program. American was my top choice because my main research goal is in conflict resolution, and the program would allow me to take coursework in more specific interests of mine such as culture and gender. However, I have received no funding from American. While Maxwell's program isn't in conflict resolution, their IR program offers Peace, Security, and Conflict as a career track to specialize in. More importantly, they have offered me a tuition scholarship and graduate assistantship totaling $51,000. I have no loans from undergrad, and I was expecting to take out loans for my Masters. But I wasn't expecting to receive such a generous amount from Syracuse. If I was between American and Syracuse with no money from either school, I would have chosen American. But interestingly enough receiving aid is what is making this decision complicated. I am looking into specific stats of what percentage of alumni ended up in what sector and what positions they're in, as in that's the best way of really gauging how worthwhile a degree from a school is. But I was curious in knowing what all of your experiences were when having to decide between two schools. American is in DC, which is the ideal place to be for IR. However, with the way Syracuse's program is set up, I could do the summer and last semester of the program in DC as well, which works out nicely. If there was anyone who could provide me with some insight on American's alumni networks versus Syracuse's alumni networks in the field, I would greatly appreciate it. I've heard a lot about the "Maxwell Mafia" but I wanted to see if anyone has any insight to offer on the Syracuse alumni network versus American's in the arena of non-profit and government work. I know that this should be an easy answer (pick Syracuse), especially since I want to work in the non-profit sector therefore taking out more loans than I need isn't smart. But I wanted to consider every single thing before I made my decision. Is it even worth considering the $80,000 debt for the ideal location and better ranking of American SIS? American is a better fit for me in terms of coursework, research interests, and location. More professors in the program have the same exact specialization as I hope to have. But Syracuse has it's global internships and Maxwell in Washington, and it's the shorter program (16 months instead of 24 months), as well as the aid. If anyone could share their main priorities to consider when stuck between two grad schools, and how they maneuvered through that decision, I will truly appreciate it!
  19. Profile School: UT Austin Major: Government (Political Science) GRE: Just started prep but first diagnostic test put me at 165 V, 160 Q GPA: 3.4 (cumulative) 3.7 (Government) (This is my main concern) Letters of rec: All 3from tenure track professors, one from a 'star' professor who I've been working in close approximation with since 2016 and who recommended doing a PhD to me. Research experience: I have plenty of research experience including a research assistant internship with an organization affiliated with the school on which I worked on several projects, both quantitative and qualitative. This included tracking banking fraud, geopolitical consequences of mines and natural resources (used STATA extensively on this) and corruption in Honduras. I have also conducted quantitative research with two professors and two of my quant own research projects. I have also presented this research at three conferences and one those was the MPSA. This is all quantitative research over a course of 2 years. Teaching experience: None, undergrads can't TA at my school Foreign language: Hindi and Urdu along with basic Spanish and French. I also have internships with various gender violence NGOs (I want to concentrate on conflict in gender for my PhD research and my current Thesis focuses on that) Do you guys think I have realistic chances of getting into a good PhD programs?
  20. Kanika2

    PhD admission chances

    So I've never posted on such a forum before so I'm sorry if some of the language is wrong. I am an undergraduate at UT Austin, graduating in December and stuck between opting for a masters or a PhD. Ideally I would love to do a PhD but those are tougher to get into so I was hoping to lay out my stats and get some honest opinions. I have plenty of research experience including a research assistant internship, research with two professors and two of my own research projects. I have also presented this research at three conferences and one those was the MPSA. I also have alot of experience working with sexual assault ngos (I want to focus my research on this in conflict zones) and I have training that allows me to directly work with survivors. I also have grant writing certification. Im hoping to have one publication done by the time I start applying. But the caveat is that my GPA is just a 3.4. This is because of science and other core requirements. My Government / Political science gpa is actually a 3.7 with mostly all As Do you guys think I have realistic chances of getting into a good PhD programs and if so, which ones? I haven't yet given my GRE but the diagnostic showed a 164 verbal and a 154 Quant which I'm sure I can raise significantly after prep. I also have very good professors that I'm asking for recommendations and am planning on working on my sop quite a bit. Sorry if this is a bit wordy and jumbled.
  21. I plan to apply to the MSFS program at Georgetown for Fall 2019 as well as a few other international relations programs. My long term goals include a career in the counterterrorism field. I'm interested in the University of Maryland's Graduate Certificate in Terrorism Analysis and I'm wondering if you all think it would have any affect on my chances of getting into grad school. Would it help pad my application or are certificates largely irrelevant to admissions committees? what about for scholarship prospects? For what it's worth, the certificate program is only one year long (2 semesters and I would start Fall 2018) and my employer will pay for it, so there is really no downside for me.
  22. Hi all, I applied for several PhD programs, but, unfortunately, none of them have been accepted. Instead, I got some offers for MA programs: Master in International Affairs at GPS, UC San Diego; Master of Arts in International Relations at GSAS, New York University; and MSc in International Relations Theory at London School of Economics. I might be admitted to MA in PoliSci at Columbia University. Which program do you think best for my late PhD applications? My academic interest is in IR theory and security, and I want to pursue a PhD at a top school after finishing one of the programs above. I am an international student, and given that my undergraduate GPA was not good, I consider I should enroll in a MA program in US or UK rather than staying in my country and applying next year. As usual among MA students, I have not been awarded a fellowship from each department. In addition, more specifically, When considering later PhD admissions, which Master program is better, 1-year or 2-year? I guess this is a general question among students majoring in social science. NYU and LSE offered me 1-year programs. I am wondering if it is quite difficult to apply for PhD programs successfully only several months after matriculation; I will have only one semester to prove my competence to professors who may write recos and to the admission committees, given that the application deadline is December. Also, I have to retake IELTS and GRE before enrollment if I choose a 1-year program. On the other hand, if I choose a 2-year program. I may be able to prove my competence, for example, by being awarded as a Dean's fellow. Professors may write stronger recos. I can retake standardized tests next year. However, tuition double, and it takes two years. I hope comments made in this topic are also helpful to other international applicants who face the same situation. I look forward to your comments.
  23. Dear All, I a an Applicant from India , and have done my undergrad in economics (india) MA in International Relations ( India) I have now applied for a second Masters in IR in UK and US . Final aim is to do a PhD and go into teaching. Till the time of writing I have been accepted into American University SIS , Korbel Denver and MPhil in Cambridge . I still wait for Oxford, CIR Chicago, SAIS and Elliott . I hope to do a PhD in USA , and have hence been building and strengthening my profile for it. What are the opinions on doing an MPhil from Oxbridge ? What are the chances of getting into US for PhD ( I like the PhD programs of Columbia and UC Berkeley ). My research interests are Middle East, Political Economy and global south critical perspectives of IR . Hence, I do hope to been trained in mixed methodology research. Any advise on US PhD in general and the programs in general would be extremely helpful. Thank you !
  24. Hi, I am now trying to decide between Columbia's MA in Political Science program and UChicago's MA in International Relations program. Seems like both of them are one-year programs (still not 100% sure if the columbia one is one year?), and UChicago gives scholarship while Columbia doesn't. Wondering if anyone has experience in either of the programs and would like to talk a bit about your experience (pros and cons etc.)? ps I am also thinking about pursuing a JD after my master's study, would like to talk about JD application for MA students as well! Any comment/opinions/suggestions would be much appreciated, thanks a million!
  25. I couldn't find a good decisions thread for International Relations masters so I figured I'd start my own -- currently over analyzing every minute of every day which program I should accept for my masters degree. I am an older student and would like to end up at the United Nations (either US or abroad). I am currently deciding between: SIPA - accepted with no aid Fletcher - accepted with significant scholarship I keep going back and forth between the financial benefit of attending Fletcher (and the focus on law and diplomacy); and the proximity to the UN of SIPA and of course my dream of attending Columbia. I am also still waiting to hear back from London School of Economics, which is a one year program (vs. two for Fletcher/SIPA). SIPA and LSE appear to be more well known than Fletcher globally, but I really don't have a good grasp on what the best decision is. Sorry for rambling, thoughts and guidance is much appreciated
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