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Found 15 results

  1. Hi all! Long time reader, first time poster. Some background: I’ve about 4+ years of professional experience working in international development. I applied to grad school to gain some quantitative skills that I lack and to explore climate policy. I am open to a career in the US Foreign Service but am also interested in working in the private sector, INGO or UN body afterward. Any advice/perspective on thinking through these offers is helpful - thank you in advance! LSE MPA: Unconditional offer. It’s a double degree (still within 2 years) with the University of Toronto (Master’s of Global Affairs). No financial aid, but can afford it without taking loans. I’m most excited about this one because of it’s a relatively small cohort, diverse and international, and affordable. Syracuse Maxwell MPA/MAIR: full ride merit scholarship. Seems like a solid program based on my research and conversations with students/alumni. But, I’m not so thrilled about being in Syracuse especially after having weathered most of the pandemic in rural Texas. Harvard MPP: no financial aid. Would need to take about $50K in loans. Can’t deny the brand but I’ve also heard from current students it’s not as academically rigorous.
  2. I'm trying to decide between Syracuse and George Washington for my Master's in IR. Syracuse has offered me a graduate assistantship, a scholarship, and a stipend that amounts to about 63,000. I am hoping that if I enroll I could be a part of the MPA/MAIR program, study abroad, and go to DC and the aid will still apply. I also like the program's focus on personal development as a leader, strategy, and management. On the other hand, I have George Washington, which was my top choice, but has only offered me 12,000 and will not negotiate. GW has a great space policy program, well-established professors, and of course, is an opportune chance to take advantage of DC. I know it sounds stupid to ask, but would it be worth it to go to GW considering the location and connections? My goal is to ultimately live in DC and work in international relations for NASA or the State Department. One day I hope to be a NASA envoy in Moscow or Paris, or in the foreign service as a diplomat/ambassador. If anyone has any experience with either program I'd greatly appreciate your input! Any advice would be most helpful, and thank you in advance!
  3. Does anyone know what the minimum acceptable score for the Duolingo English Test is in order to apply for The Fletcher School-Tufts University? FYI, in their website, they show the minimum scores for TOEFL and IELTS: TOEFL: 100 (with sub-scores of 25 on each section) IELTS: 7.0 (with sub-scores of 7 on each section) In addition, there is extra information too: students who have achieved C1 Advanced or C2 proficiency on the Cambridge English Assessment can also have the English testing requirement waived.
  4. Hi guys! I am applying for the MAIR program of SAIS and god is it confusing! Would really love some tips/ help from fellow applicants/ current students especially regarding their essays and LORs. They only need 2 LORs and I am confused whether I should give both academic (one vouching for my policy skills and another psychology) or one professional as well. I have highlighted my psycho-political skills quite a bit and also tech so I am confused! help a girl out 😢
  5. Hello all! I got my final grad school results today, and I feel so lucky to have two amazing options. I applied to nine programs, got accepted to eight, and received merit aid/fellowship offers from seven. Of those seven, I narrowed my list down to two: International Affairs at Columbia SIPA, or Security Studies at Georgetown SFS. Please help me choose! Any input helps. Here are my considerations so far: 1. Money: Columbia has offered $99,000, and Georgetown has offered $20,000. That translates to about 70% of the cost of Columbia ($130k) and 25% of the cost of Georgetown ($80k). Both schools estimate indirect costs at about $25k per year, but the cost of living in NYC tends to be somewhat higher than DC. I have no debt, and around $70k in college savings (thank you, National Merit Scholarship), so either way I have enough to attend without incurring debt, but it seems like Columbia is the better deal financially. 2. Academics: both programs have similar course requirements, as I would be choosing the International Security concentration at either university. Both have incredible faculty. At Georgetown, I could learn directly from practitioners like Madeleine Albright, Chuck Hagel, and other distinguished and well-known figures. Foreign Policy ranks Georgetown's IR Master's programs #1 for a reason! But at Columbia, faculty are more research-focused and well-known in their academic fields rather than in the public eye. Foreign Policy ranks Columbia fifth for Master's programs, but for PhDs, Columbia is fourth and Georgetown is down at #11. If I want to continue my studies either immediately or after getting some international career experience, Columbia might be the better choice. But Georgetown is #1 for getting folks into the Foreign Service, which is where I want to be. 3. Connections: I would make great peer, faculty, and internship connections at either university, they would just be different. In terms of peers, international students make up 50% of SIPA, but only 5% of SSP at Georgetown. However, SSP can be taken part-time while MIA is full-time, so SSP students cover a wider range of ages and career stages, including many veterans and former/current members of the US National Security apparatus. When it comes to faculty, Georgetown professors might help me find jobs in DC/US government more easily, but Columbia professors could help me get published, or get jobs in NY/international orgs. Finally, for internships, it's hard to beat DC's options of Capitol Hill, think tanks, and government agencies. But NYC has the UN, which would be a dream come true to intern for, as well as many other international orgs, multinational companies, and NGOs. 4. Personal and career goals: as mentioned above, I've dreamed of becoming a US foreign service officer for several years now. My plan has gone like this: 1) undergrad at cheap state school (check), 2) intern with orgs in DC (double check), 3) Fulbright grant abroad (check), 4) Master's at a prestigious school, 5) take the FSOT and start my career as a diplomat. Since I settled on these goals, Georgetown has been my dream school. But before any of this, as a kid growing up in Indiana, I dreamed of living in NYC and attending an Ivy League school, and Columbia was my perfect combination. So now I'm picking between a new dream and an old one- a privileged position, I know. 5. Research focus: I want to work at the intersection of security and environmental policy. Yes, I want to travel the world and be a diplomat, but I think environmental security is so fascinating and relevant to all the international problems I want to deal with. Water, natural resources, clean energy, pollution, biodiversity, sustainable development- viewing these issues through the lens of security makes people listen to environmentalists! I want to contribute to research that matters to policymakers, that gets turned into policy decisions that matter to everyone. At Georgetown, I'd be starting from a US National Security perspective and working outward towards other places and people. At Columbia, I'd be closer to academia and international orgs, but further from US policy. I might also be able to branch out a little bit more at Columbia, as the International Affairs degree is more general in outlook than Georgetown's more specific Security Studies. If you've read this whole essay, thank you already! Please comment with your input or well-wishes if you have the time. Thanks again, Noa
  6. Hi, I applied for political science PhD this year, and so far I'm considering from: Georgia Tech Nunn School George Mason Schar School University of Georgia SUNY Binghamton I feel ranking is kinda bogus. (Some rankings say Nunn's better, some say Schar, make me so confused) For now I feel George Mason matches my research direction (International Relationship) the most. But I also think GTech and University of Georgia are great program as well. Does anyone can provide any suggestion? Appreciate!
  7. Hi everyone! This is my first post on gradcafe after lurking for a while, because I really need advice. I've been admitted to both SIS and SIPA, for very similar programs (the SIS program I was admitted to closely matches my chosen SIPA concentration). SIS gave me a good amount of merit aid and an assistantship, and SIPA gave me nothing. My initial reaction is to go with American. I was admitted a while ago, so I've been going to various admitted student events, and I've had great experiences with all of them--I love their mission and the specific academic program, and it seems like a place I could really thrive. The two programs are closely ranked, as well, so this seems like the obvious choice. However, when I've asked around, the impression I've gotten is that, regardless of rankings, the Columbia/Ivy League name will open doors that American simply will not. Obviously, the end goal of going to graduate school is a career, and above everything I want to secure a good job moving forward in my life, especially in this competitive field. I guess my main question boils down to this: is it really worth it to push for Columbia, even if it would quintouple the debt I already have for undergrad (American would only double it)? That prospect is scary to me, but I'd hate to lose opportunities that would otherwise make it worth it (also, obviously, I do love SIPA and their program. These are my top two programs and if they had offered me comparable funding, it would be a very hard decision, but I'd ultimately lean towards SIPA). Thanks so much!
  8. Hi everyone! I really want to understand how different international affairs and public policy, as graduate courses, are. I am planning to pursue master's in either of the courses but haven't really been able to understand how different the career paths are for each. From what I've learned so far, it seems public policy focuses much more on quantitative skills like statistics, data and economics than IA. Moreover, some people have remarked that IA is too general or vague, especially in terms of profession. It would be really helpful if any of you could share your own experience. Some stats about me: I did my bachelor's last year in computer science engineering with a cumulative GPA of 9.96 on a scale of 10. Currently working as a data science engineer. I don't really have any experience in the relevant fields and am an international student hence I really am confused since most colleges seem to prefer st opportunities in the public sector.
  9. Hi everyone! I really want to understand how different international affairs and public policy, as graduate courses, are. I am planning to pursue master's in either of the courses but haven't really been able to understand how different the career paths are for each. From what I've learned so far, it seems public policy focuses much more on quantitative skills like statistics, data and economics than IA. Moreover, some people have remarked that IA is too general or vague, especially in terms of profession. It would be really helpful if any of you could share your own experience. Some stats about me: I did my bachelor's last year in computer science engineering with a cumulative GPA of 9.96 on a scale of 10. Currently working as a data science engineer. I don't really have any experience in the relevant fields and am an international student hence I really am confused since most colleges seem to prefer students with at least SOME relevant background and international students may have limited work opportunities in the public sector.
  10. Hey everyone, I'm new to this forum and have never posted in places like this before so I apologise in advance if this is the wrong place for my post. I'm a Canadian student at an okay university in Canada. I would like to pursue a master's degree in IR/global politics/public policy or something along those lines. Ideally, I would like to study in Europe, preferably at LSE. I am also open to applying to other schools like Sciences Po, King's College, and maybe even the Graduate Institute in Switzerland. I have a year of school left and my cumulative GPA is a tad bit under 3.4 but I am hoping my extracurriculars can compensate for this. I am majoring in political science and have taken very basic courses in economics and quantitative research methods. I speak three Asian languages (one of them fluently), French, and English. Extracurricular Activities: -wrote articles for online international relations publications -served as a Regional Director for an international affairs publication -started an IR publication at my uni -served as president of a major political club -did model UN -currently a student mentor -currently an advisor at a think tank -volunteer at a legal research centre Work Experience: -I have roughly 2 years of work experience -interned on programs, policy, and community engagement for a royal charity -interned at the federal foreign affairs ministry in the international trade section helping businesses export and in the FDI team I don't intend to study beyond a master's degree and plan to work in government for some years and then maybe and international org like the UN or in government relations for a company. I was wondering if I could get some honest input on what my chances could be based on your experience or based on the experiences of people you know. Open to hearing any advice/suggestions you have and looking forward to hearing your experiences! Thanks!
  11. Hey y'all, I am ecstatic after receiving acceptances from both of these schools. After evacuating from the Peace Corps, I worried that I would miss the application deadlines and be stuck in limbo but both schools really worked with me to submit a completed application before the deadline. Nonetheless, now I face a tough decision. Ideally, following graduate school, I aspire for a career in international conflict mediation specifically in the Middle East or Southeast Asia. As of right now, it would be only slightly more to attend Seton Hall and the proximity to NYC bolsters the overall attractiveness of attending Seton Hall. That being said, it seems that Maxwell is overall more connected throughout DC and in the international affairs world, so I am at an impasse. Any feedback on these schools would be greatly appreciated!
  12. Hi guys, I have been accepted to the MA program at Johns Hopkins SAIS, the MIA program at UCSD School of Global Policy and Strategy and the MGA program at Munk School of Global Affairs. I have read tons of info about these programs and I have attended the Open House events at SAIS and UCSD. However, I am still undecided. What do you think is the best program in terms of employability and education considering that I am an international student who wants to find a job in North America? My area of specialization is international economics and I would like to work in consulting/think-tanks/business/banks. Thanks!!
  13. Did anyone apply to the double MA in journalism and international affairs at Sciences Po, Paris this year or in previous years? If someone did apply or has attended, could you comment on your application experience/subsequent studies? On a general note, how are foreign journalism degrees looked upon if one wished to find a job in the United States or elsewhere upon graduation - and does it hold a light to "top" American programs such as Columbia, Berkeley, etc.? Thanks in advance!
  14. I am trying to gauge admissions outcomes for the upcoming admissions cycle for MA programs in international development and affairs. If you could, please include the following information in your response: GPA: GRE (Verbal/Math/Writing) Applied: Accepted: Rejected: Waitlist: description of relevant work experience and other factors: Thank you!
  15. Hi all! I got admitted conditionally to Columbia SIPA and Tufts Fletcher. I have to take an undergraduate level Principles of Economics class (or Principles of Microeconomics and Principles of Macroeconomics classes) before enrolling, since I lack in quant background. I have tried to find classes here in my country (in Southeast Asia), but to no avail. I think the most viable option for me is online classes provided by US universities. Can anybody recommend good online economics classes that are affordable? So far the classes I've found cost over 1 thousand dollar! Thanks for your help!
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