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Found 23 results

  1. Hello! I’m an Asian student with offers of admission to the counseling graduate program at both Penn State and UPenn. I’m having a hard time deciding. Penn State’s program is ranked among the top ten, but UPenn seems to be more reputed as a school. However UPenn’s program is only a year long including the practicum , while Penn State offers a two year program with a practicum of 1.5 years. My goal is to pursue doctoral study (not seek licensure for practice) so I’m wondering if I should go ahead with UPenn. I will have to take a loan for either (and the tuition is in the same ball park), so the financial aspect does not count. Plus I have professors whose research interests are closely aligned with mine at both universities, so I’m quite torn. What would you guys do or advise?
  2. Hi folks! Last month I was accepted to the South Asian Studies M.A. program at Columbia GSAS with $10,000 scholarship. (There's another thread on it, but it's quite old-2011). I was allowed to deefer admission until fall 2019. Did anyone else apply and/or get accepted to the program, or is a current student/grad? A couple questions: Will $40,000 be enough for cost of living for fall 2019, spring 2020, summer 2020, and fall 2020? That's how much I should have saved up. How competitive is it to get the Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) fellowship? Do most people who apply to one get one? I want to study Hindi. Do most grad students live in graduate housing, or at least in Morningside Heights? I plan to get a terminal M.A. and not go the Ph.D. path and become a prof, so I was hoping to get practical experience during the semesters (volunteer work, internships, etc. 8-10 hours/week) so I could be in the best position to get a job at graduation. Is this feasible given the rigorous workload of a grad student? I also will hopefully be doing a work-study job, as unfortunately, internships in the public sector are unpaid, ugh. At GSAS I plan to take 9-12 credits a semester tops. Also, does GSAS provide stipend funding for internships the way SIPA, the law school, etc. do? What are your impressions of the department in general? What do you wish you had known before starting it? What are the typical career paths of terminal M.A.s in this department? I'll be in my early 30s when I start. Are most folks 21-22 and coming fresh out of undergrad, or are there plenty of GSAS students with past careers? How is the counseling center at Columbia?
  3. Hello everyone, I am currently an undergraduate student studying History at SUNY Oneonta. My current GPA at SUNY O is 3.93, and I am working for the department chair as a research assistantship (funded work). I have worked as a research assistant for another professor, and I will be working as a teaching assistant next semester. I am also learning Russian and French, and I will be studying abroad in Saint Petersburg. Unfortunately, my academic history is hardly great outside of SUNY Oneonta. I started college when I was 16 at SUNY Delhi. I did 100 level classes with a mix of A's and B's. I started the nursing program there, and the results were poor. I obtained largely C's (some A's and B's but they were online classes). It was an associate degree, and unfortunately in the last semester I obtained two D's, which did not allow me to graduate. I guess I couldn't get my mind to enjoy the nursing like I have the history. With that said I looking for answers and advice. How do schools (PhD in history programs) view my nursing school failures? Even though the GPA is good, does SUNY O, hardly a reknown school, not make it look like a great turn around? What schools would be within my reach? Any response is greatly appreciated!
  4. Did a search for "columbia 2018" and didn't find anything, so I thought I'd create a thread! Anyone else send in their deposit?
  5. Hey y'all! I'm a prospective Computer Science PhD student interested in natural language processing. I've been accepted into a certain Ivy with a great reputation in a great location, but a location which happens to be extremely expensive, as most east-coast cities are. I've also been accepted into another school (henceforth Great School) whose research interests are a bit closer to mine and with a similar--if slightly lower--level of prestige, and in a much cheaper (but also much more dangerous) location. This is a 5-year program, so I want to make sure I'll be happy where I end up. How should I decide? Ivy's location is more expensive, but it's been my dream to live in an east-coast city for a long time now and this would be my chance. Great School's location is very cheap, but very dangerous. Ivy's overall computer science reputation is better, but Great School's natural language processing reputation is better. Ivy's research interests are close to mine, and there are multiple faculty doing work I'd like to be on. Great School has research even closer to my interests, and tons of faculty doing things I'd kill to do for a living. Both schools are covering my tuition. However, I'm getting approximately the same stipend in both places, and Ivy is in a much more costly location. At the same time, however, I have lived in Great School's city for a summer and absolutely hated everything about the surrounding city, despite somewhat liking Great School's campus. Ivy's faculty seem to have a reputation for neglecting their students, despite being friendly overall; I have had to fight for their attention, but they are always great about answering my questions when they get back to me. Great School has been trying to recruit me hard and they are very accommodating toward my interests and concerns, and they seem much more interested in me as a researcher. The faculty I'd be working with at Great School are cited noticeably more than those that I would be working with at Ivy. This is essentially a decision of quality-of-life versus quality-of-work. Basically, I'm deciding between research quality/faculty compatibility and location/prestige. I know that research should be the most important thing, but Great School's location is just so antithetical to everything I want from my home city. Ivy has a wonderful reputation and a location I've been dying to get to for a long time, but I'm worried that the research experience itself may not be as smooth, despite being amazing overall regardless. Both have great alumni connections in companies I want to work for upon graduation, and it's hard to go wrong with either, really. Any input would be wonderfully and genuinely appreciated. Thanks y'all!
  6. Is anyone interested in mutual assistance with their applications to universities for masters and phd? I'm thinking reviewing each other's statement of purpose, offering suggestions, reviewing applications and answers to their questions, etc. Tips on studying for the GRE, etc? All free mutual assistance. I am applying to a masters degree at an ivy league school. We can use this forum or other platforms. Hope to hear from people.
  7. I am wait-listed at my top choice (ivy league) and I'm wondering where everyone has been accepted, what your subfields are, and which offer you may accept. Thanks!
  8. Hello, So I have been admitted into a top PhD program in anthropology at one of these northeastern ivy league schools that I never thought I would actually get in to. The program seems great, the funding is amazing but there are no professors really related to my topic (in the broad sense). They are some professors related to my secondary field of interest (environmental anthropology) and to the region I want to work, which is what my potential advisor's research is on but my main field of research is not represented. The other schools I got into have professors more linked to my topic but are not top programs (and sometimes with less good funding), so I don't know if the main criteria should be to have professors in the department linked to one's field of study.
  9. What should one do? Pay $50,000 tuition at an ivy league university, or pay $0 - $10,000 at some other university (say any US university with QS world ranking below 250)
  10. Having gone through the application process at American universities, I have found the State universities to have the friendliest application portals. They usually have the same interface and one can easily go through all the pages/tabs/questions etc. The recommendation list can be updated any time before the deadline. More importantly, they send the recommendation requests immediately after filling in the details. The best part is the payment system where it is a breeze to pay fees for international applicants like me. They accept many, if not all, types of credit/debit cards. Not to mention the application fees are usually less than $50, sometimes even $30ish. On the contrary, many Ivy League and private universities are seriously a pain in the nether regions. Aside from the fees, which are usually above $100 for international applicants , the online portals are user unfriendly and prone to crash/errors. The recommendation system is not smooth and sometimes one has to complete the app and pay the fees before these to be generated. The payment systems are also complicated and only accept a few credit cards. Wondering if/when they will modify their systems. If funds-starved state universities can do it, what's holding them back? Donors?
  11. What are some notable American/Canadian Philosophy PhD programs with Accelerated Tracks for those with a Masters degree in philosophy.
  12. What are some notable American/Canadian History PhD programs with Accelerated Tracks for those with a Masters degree in history. A program like Duke's.
  13. Dear all, My specialism is political thought and intellectual history. At top US institutions like Princeton and Harvard, would I have a greater chance of admission if I apply for PhD programs in history, or in political science? Which field is less competitive in top research universities? Thanks, Dem
  14. Hey everyone. I'm really sorry if you've seen this sort of thread a billion times and have gotten sick of it, but I had trouble locating a thread like this that actually applies directly to me. I graduated this year with a BA from University College London, and am set to begin a master's course at LSE this fall. For my undergraduate education, I had to write a 10000 word dissertation based on my original research, and will have to write a 15000 for my master's course. After I am done at LSE, I hope to undertake a PhD in political science (focusing on political philosophy and theory) at an institution like Harvard, Columbia, or Georgetown. My question is, do I have a chance considering I have no real research experience in the sense that my name has not appeared on any peer reviewed or published academic journals? Or do my undergraduate/graduate dissertations count as research experience? Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks, Gretchen
  15. Are you looking to reach an Ivy League or your dream school? I can help with the process. Not too long ago, I was in your shoes. I thought that attending a great university or an Ivy League meant that you had to be at the top of your class or be really rich. I was neither. In fact, I was the first person in my immediate and extended family to go to college! Needless to say, I had no clue about the college/grad school application process, but I was motivated to change my destiny and willing to learn. I received a full-tuition, four-year leadership scholarship to attend a top private university for undergrad and received my masters from the Harvard Graduate School of Education, specializing in international education. I have gained 10+ years of experience in educating and coaching others and 8+ years of professional writing. I enjoy helping others achieve their goals and believe that anything is possible with a proper PLAN. If you are interested in learning how to prepare the strongest grad school application possible for an Ivy League or your dream school, I am happy to help. My services include help with the following: personal statement writing, admissions strategy, interview prep, and admissions application review. Feel free to message me with any queries.
  16. Any feedback will be greatly appreciated! Bachelors: Psychology Masters of Science: Human Cognitive Neuropsychology Undergrad overall GPA (I had one horrible semester): 3.465 Undergrad Psychology GPA: 3.8 I am a horrible test taker: -GRE Verbal: 149; 42% -GRE Quant: 146; 24% -GRE Writing: 4.5; 82% Research experience: 3 years (Research technician in EEG , fMRI and clinical lab); 3 years (Project coordinator at upper limb prosthesis research lab) Clinical experience: 3 years (Clinical lab working with patients with ASD, dyslexia and schizophrenia and assist with writing neuropsych reports); 1 year (clinical lab learning how to administer cognitive measures and shadowing Clinical Psychologist). Teaching experience: Taught two one-hour courses to research interns on EEG data analysis and protocol for conducting research with at risk populations. Supervised training of summer interns at Neuroimaging lab. Abstract submission and Poster presentation: 5 (3 secondary author @ VA medical center; 2 first authors @ Dubrovnik Conference on Cognitive Science VI; and @ University of Edinburgh, respectively). Publications: 6 (2 second author, 3 third authorships). Potential publication by time I submit PHD applications: 9 (three manuscripts currently under review) Race: Black Gender: Male Languages speak and understand: English (fluent), French (can semi comprehend and speak), creole (can semi-comprehend a little difficulty speaking) Schools applying to, in order of preference: 1. Yale University 2. Harvard University 3. University of Pennsylvania 4. University of Michigan 5. University of Iowa 6. Temple University 7. DUKE University 8. University of Oregon 9. Indiana University Bloomington 10. Washington State University 11. Boston University 12. The university of Vermont 13. The University of Maine 14. University of Missouri, Kansas City 15. George Mason University 16. Eastern Michigan University 17. University of Wisconsin-Madison 18. University of Wyoming
  17. Hi all, I'm an international relations major who speaks a few lesser-known languages with several years in management consulting under my belt, and I'm planning to apply to urban planning/public policy programs this fall. I'd like my classes to have a strong international focus as well as give me a solid understanding of quantitative (statistics) skills and technical (GIS, data management, data visualization using R, Python, etc) skills, as I didn't get these in undergrad either because they didn't mesh with my qualitative studies or were too stovepiped at the time in the engineering/math departments to be widely applied to political science/international development. I've considered a public policy master's, but urban planning seemed like a great fit for my creative interests in design and interests in working on international issues where my language and cultural knowledge could be put to use. Sound logical, or too romanticized for someone with no experience in the urban planning field beyond some GIS work? Beyond grad school, I'd like to be competitive at either an international development group in the private sector (tech startup?), international finance (World Bank), or NGO sector. Here's my list of schools: MIT DUSP Harvard HKS/GSD Columbia GSAPP/SIPA (Urban Studies concentration) UPenn MUSA And a few others with less of an explicit Urban Planning emphasis: Tufts Fletcher UChicago Harris/Computational Analysis A few questions on both grad schools and careers: 1) Any schools I'm missing that I should check out? I've heard the Ivies may not be as important with their brand-name as say for business schools, but the programs look interesting. I'd like to be in a major city for networking purposes as well as to get some exposure to local infrastructure/planning programs, even though I don't see myself working in local or state government long-term. This list was also put together to give me the most flexibility in terms of career options in the field. 2) What are some urban planning jobs outside of local or state government that do work or plan internationally? I'm aware of a few civil engineering or international development groups like AECOM or Louis Berger, but welcome any other suggestions. Thanks for any advice you can provide!
  18. Hello all! I recently started the application process again, applying to PhD programs, specifically Clinical psychology programs. One thing I've always been told is that APA accredited, Clinical psychology programs are extremely competitive. Because my undergrad GPA was so low: 2.78, I never applied to a PhD program, but instead went straight into a Master's program at Drexel Univ. I've managed to keep an okay GPA of 3.77, along with working as a Research assistant and interning in a psychiatric hospital. So with all this being said, do you think I would competitive for admissions into an Ivy League psych program? Do you think there are the areas I could improve on or add too to up my chances of admission or at least to stand out and score an interview? What I'm basically looking for advice or success stories of getting into PhD programs! Thanks ahead of time! McKSher
  19. I was wanting to apply to Harvard's Graduate School of Education. I'd be doing the Prevention Science and Practice with maybe the CAS the following year. I have a good GPA but don't have a lot of experience. I was told by all of my grad schools that they didn't require experience and it would be good if I had it in case everything else wasn't balanced out. I looked at several other Ivy Leagues in social work and I really liked Columbia and Harvard's the best. I have yet to take my GRE and am super nervous for that. Anyone else been accepted by Harvard to tell me what they're looking for? I have a 4.0 GPA and hopefully will have experience to go along with it, but I'm not sure. Let me know. Thanks
  20. I am majoring in Child Protection and Juvenile Justice. I am getting a very good GPA, but I haven't taken the GRE test yet. I plan to take that in the coming months, before the summer when I start applying to grad schools. Yale is my Ivy League that I really want to go to. I'm attracted to the campus, the curriculum, everything about the school stands out to me. Don't get me wrong, I am also applying to other Ivies for grad school, but this is the only one that I would have to apply for public health. I got my AA in psychology and was going to do behavioral science at my current university before I switched to my current major of CPJJ. Social and behavioral sciences would be my closest thing to my current major but I'm unsure if they will take me because of my field not relating well to public health. I can get some public health jobs that can pertain to behavioral sciences, but I'm not sure if I should also have job experience related to social work and child welfare. I'm really confused on if I can correlate these two majors or not. I feel like they can be, but I'm not sure how to do it in a way that doesn't make me feel like I'm wasting my time. I am very happy with my current major and am learning a lot, but when I go to grad school I want to build on my skills more, not feel like I'm starting something totally different and not like it as much. If any current Yale MPH students can help me out with this, I would really appreciate it. I am very worried that they won't accept me due to differences in degree pursuits and majors, but if I could go to Yale, it would mean a lot. If I could get into any Ivy, it would mean a lot, but Yale is my top choice. Thanks for the help guys
  21. I am going to a private university in Nebraska and I'm in the accelerated degree program, which means I'll be done in March of 2017. I'm currently getting a 4.0 gpa. If everything holds up, I'll graduate with a 4.0 and get on the Dean's Honors List. I'm planning on applying to eight graduate schools, three of which are Ivies. I called each grad school and asked if there was a set amount of experience to get into their program and they all replied with no. They said they mostly look at the parts of your application that are your personal statement and your GPA and GRE scores. I am majoring in Child Protection and Juvenile Justice so my masters will be in social work, but I'm unsure of what to do to boost my application so I have a shot of at least trying to get in. I will have work experience by the time I apply and I'll try to gain as much knowledge as I can. I'm planning on applying to UPenn, Columbia, and Yale. I know they're very selective but what do you think I can do to make myself a better candidate? Thanks for the help guys.
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