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Found 11 results

  1. UndecidedLawyer

    PhD (Health Policy) after JD

    2013 T10 law grad here. I've been working as a litigator at a "biglaw" firm for the past ~6 years and do primarily health-adjacent litigation. I am thinking of transitioning to part-time and applying to a part-time Ph.D. program in health policy. Anyone else in similar shoes? Anyone have any ideas whether part-time Ph.D. and part-time biglaw are compatible? Any idea whether this combination of experience would actually be a good combo, post-graduation? Any insight appreciated!
  2. MettaSutta

    Careers in Legal Academia?

    I'm a recent JD grad, currently clerking for a judge (two years). Legal academia, particularly clinical legal teaching, would be my dream job. Would getting an L.L.M./Ph.D./S.J.D. in law help towards obtaining such a position?I was an OK but not great student in my JD program, and I know that hiring for academia can be very elitist.
  3. Hi all, I'm looking into a joint degree program where I would walk away with both a MPA and a JD. Most of the schools I am looking at say the program will take a total of 4 years, with one program saying it will only take 3.5. I am aware that since I'd be in school for a longer period of time, I will accrue more debt than if I elected to pursue just one of these degrees. My question is for people who have or are currently enrolled in a dual degree program (mostly looking at MPA/MPP/JD) about how does your financial aid differ compared to just being enrolled at one school? Many thanks in advance, I appreciate any answers or additional guidance.
  4. Hi, I am now trying to decide between Columbia's MA in Political Science program and UChicago's MA in International Relations program. Seems like both of them are one-year programs (still not 100% sure if the columbia one is one year?), and UChicago gives scholarship while Columbia doesn't. Wondering if anyone has experience in either of the programs and would like to talk a bit about your experience (pros and cons etc.)? ps I am also thinking about pursuing a JD after my master's study, would like to talk about JD application for MA students as well! Any comment/opinions/suggestions would be much appreciated, thanks a million!
  5. Hi all, (I posted this in the law forum as well, so thanks for your patience if you saw this there) I'm looking into a joint degree program where I would walk away with both a MPA and a JD. Most of the schools I am looking at say the program will take a total of 4 years, with one program saying it will only take 3.5. I am aware that since I'd be in school for a longer period of time, I will accrue more debt than if I elected to pursue just one of these degrees. My question is for people who have or are currently enrolled in a dual degree program (mostly looking at MPA/MPP/JD) about how does your financial aid differ compared to just being enrolled at one school? Many thanks in advance, I appreciate any answers or additional guidance.
  6. Hi, I am an undergraduate student who attends a decent public university and has a good enough GPA & LSAT score to get into a top law school at my state. I am in a fortunate enough position to not be concerned with how much money I make as long as I make above $40k (as a freelance tutor, I've been making decent amount without much time commitment). I like and am good at writing, reading, speaking, analyzing, teaching, and presenting/defending arguments. Coming from a teaching background, I know that I would love to be a Philosophy professor as well as tackle the challenging process of becoming one. Another aspect of being a professor that appeals to me is not having to be in a service sector where I may experience a lot of stress due to my clients. The only thing that shies me away from this career path is the dismal job prospect, which is between 4~15% for receiving a tenured-track position. Compounding this issue is the fact that I do not want to leave my home city, which makes this 4~15% even slimmer. As for pursuing law, I understand that this process is tough and that the job prospect is not high either–although it is better than that of pursuing professorship. So the question is, should I pursue law or becoming a professor? If law, which field should I pursue or avoid and why? I am open to any field as long as it has a reasonable job prospect and does not entail agonizing stress level (i.e. having to deal with unreasonable customers who refuse to pay or put you through mental hell). Thank you for your insight.
  7. So I've got kind of a unique situation and posted a very similar question over in the Economics subform, however I am also exploring PhD programs in PoliSci/IR and would like to get similar feedback on those. I'm currently a JD student at Yale Law School but I very much would like to be able to transition into academia at some point, perhaps sooner than later. While I initiated my legal education with a major focus on public policy and government work, I feel like graduate studies in a social science field would be beneficial in a number of ways including allowing me to keep the door open to teaching later on, something I'm intensely interested in doing and, given the fact that I'm already at YLS which places the most number of new law profs nationwide feel it would be good to take advantage of that and set myself on a course that would allow me to teach easily. However, aside from teaching and academia, I feel like it may still be worthwhile for a career path involving international law and foreign policy at places like the State Dept. In any case, I've decided that I'd like to at least explore the option of doing graduate studies in International Relations (which I majored in undergrad along with Economics) after I complete law school. But given that this is an entirely new idea to me that I haven't really explored much in the past, I don't know much about how the process works and right now just want to get feelers as to how an applicant with a background like mine would even be viewed and potentially what I should start thinking about right now if I want to apply in a few years. Not necessarily looking for feedback on whether this is even a worthwhile endeavor for a JD student...those conversations I will be having with professors I know who know my background and goals better, including a professor I have who did basically this exact same thing (PhD after JD). For now I'm just curious about whether I'd even be able to get into a program to make this worthwhile Background on me-- - JD student at YLS - Majored in Political Science and Economics in undergrad, graduated with a 4.0 and almost all A+'s in my Econ classes. I have decent relationships with my political science professors but only one professor that really knows me and my work well (she was my senior thesis advisor, and my senior thesis was in IR and political psychology). Neither my PoliSci nor Econ degrees were hugely quantitative so I worry about not having a quant background that may be looked for. I did get through multivariable calc in college and did excellent in my courses, but other than my senior thesis I didn't do other independent research. In addition, I went to a UC and, with large class sizes and professors that don't make teaching a priority, even though I did really well I feel like I may not have the requisites that a grad program would look for. I would have the opportunity to produce even more major research projects at YLS, however I'm not sure if a PhD program would really care about this type of work. - Haven't taken the GRE yet but i'm typically very good at standardized tests, I got 99th percentile on the LSAT, so I'm confident I could knock that out How would schools view an application from a JD student interested in teaching (perhaps, law teaching)? Does it help at all coming from YLS? Will publishing while in law school help? And how much of an impact will not having research experience in undergrad outside of a senior thesis hurt? Appreciate the feedback
  8. So I've got kind of a unique situation. I'm currently a JD student at Yale Law School but I very much would like to be able to transition into academia at some point, perhaps sooner than later. While I initiated my legal education with a major focus on public policy and government work, I feel like graduate studies in a social science field would be beneficial in a number of ways including opening the door for me to transition into academia at some point as well as giving me the social science skillset that I think is becoming more and more important in technocratic policy decision-making and litigation. Most lawyers don't have this training and I think that's a definite detriment to the practice today when technology, data-driven analyses, and more complex social issues are at the forefront. In any case, I've decided that I'd like to at least explore the option of doing graduate studies in Economics (which I majored in undergrad) after I complete law school. But given that this is an entirely new idea to me that I haven't really explored much in the past, I don't know much about how the process works and right now just want to get feelers as to how an applicant with a background like mine would even be viewed and potentially what I should start thinking about right now if I want to apply in a few years. Background on me-- - JD student at YLS - Majored in Political Science and Economics in undergrad, graduated with a 4.0 and almost all A+'s in my Econ classes. However, I only have a really strong relationship with one economics professor at my school, my senior thesis was in International Relations, not economics, and I haven't really done Econ research (independently or with a professor). I also worry that my undergrad education in Econ was less than stellar. I went to a UC and, with large class sizes and professors that don't make teaching a priority, even though I did really well I feel like I may not have the requisites that a grad program would look for. Most of my classes were theory based and the only really heavy quantitative class I had was Econometrics (which I excelled in, but still) and my thesis in PoliSci was mostly qualitative. - I have done other major research projects such as my senior thesis and I have the opportunity to produce even more major research projects at YLS, however I'm not sure if an Econ program would really care about this type of work. - Haven't taken the GRE yet but i'm typically very good at standardized tests, I got 99th percentile on the LSAT, so I'm confident I could knock that out How would schools like Stanford, Berkeley, or UCLA view my application? Does it help at all coming from YLS? Will publishing while in law school help (what if I attempt to use quantitative methods)? And how much of an impact will not having econ research experience in undergrad hurt? Appreciate the feedback
  9. DreamyMatcha

    JD vs MPP

    Hi all, I am an undergrad majoring in Sociology and Political Science and minoring in Chinese. I am debating whether to go for a Master in Public Policy or JD in law school. I read a lot on this topic and everyone seems to be saying different things. Background Info: I am generally interested in areas of immigration, women's rights, domestic violence, human trafficking, LGBT rights, and much more into international issues. If go to law school, I would like to do immigration law or international law. If I do an MPP, I am thinking of becoming a policy/program analyst but do not know what field yet. I would like a job that balances between something I find meaningful and works to improve social justice, and pays around $60,000-$80,000 per year (do they exist?). It seems that immigration law and certain policy analyst jobs provide that sort of $, but please correct me if I'm wrong. Questions: 1. Many comments say that an MPP is very different from a JD and will give u skills a JD wont, and vice versa. What are the specific skills one will gain by doing each degree that one couldn't obtain doing the other degree? What are the advantages each have on employment? 2. I can find a lot of information about job prospects for law grads but not MPP grads. If anyone got an MPP, around what percentage of your class got jobs in related fields? How competitive is it to get a related job compared to lawyers? 3. Are there certain personality traits or working styles that would be more suitable for one type of career than the other? 4. How do the hours, work/life balance, and pay of a policy/program analyst compare with lawyers (especially immigration lawyers)? Does the average MPP grad make less, more, or equal to around $60,000-80,000 a year? Any insights would truly help. Thank you so much!
  10. Hi all. Thanks in advance for reading my post. This forum has already been helpful in the two days that I've known about it. I am a current senior. I go to a small, no-name liberal arts college, and dreamt of going to a Stanford/Berkeley early in my chemistry career. I'm fortunate in my undergrad experience to do well in my undergraduate program, but I have been in a very supportive and much easier environment than a competitive research university. I chose not to apply to any top, super competitive programs for this reason. I've heard unhappy stories from students who went to or work at those schools. I didn't want to drown when I may barely be able to swim. After completing an internship for and receiving letter of recommendation from a PI at a nearby research university (ranked well and respected in all of its programs, but not specifically known for its chemistry), I applied to and received a verbal offer from this school with ~30k stipend/yr. I applied to only this program because it has felt like a good fit, size and culture wise, and it seemed like a better next step than a competitive school. My partner also needs to finish school in the area next year, so this is also convenient for both of us, and I would not want to attend any of the other local schools for a PhD. I would rather wait a year and apply to a better known program that has specific research foci that align with mine. Even though I am interested in public health and environmental policy (which are addressed specifically in the PhD program at some schools like Berkeley), I figure that I can get a PhD first from this school and then get an MPH or JD online, locally, or elsewhere. The previously mentioned PI is a sort of rock star in a specific area of research. After he verbally and loosely agreed to co-advising me (he has been flirting with retirement for the last 10 years), he recently confirmed that he would retire 2 years into my 5-year track. This means he would mentor me, but not be on my final thesis committee or an official advisor. However, having more work experience with him and receiving mentorship from him I think would be an honor. Additionally, and as much as I hate to say it, having his name as a part of my undergraduate research experience has already opened doors in networking. There is another, successful professor who is willing to co-advise with the first professor. I am excited at the prospect of this; although their research methods are not particularly interesting to me, both of their careers and collaborative projects include answering some very cool and relevant research questions. However, some of my peers are telling me that by having co-advisors with one of them retiring is basically shooting myself in the foot. They think co-advising might be messy and that I would be stranded when professor 1 retires. Now for my questions: #1: Do any of you have experience with or know of co-advising situations? How did they go? What do you think I should do? I've already read some posts about co-advising, but they weren't as unique as my situation with a PI being a big name and also retiring mid-PhD. #2: Is it a poor idea to go to a not competitive school that doesn't focus on public health or environmental policy when that is my end goal? There is a possible joint JD degree available at this school, and I know I could get a JD or MPH after completing the PhD. I just don't know if people who work in this sort of interdisciplinary field have to go to a school focused on green chemistry or public health to be competitive and effective in the job market and society, respectively. I also figured that if I don't go to a top 10 school that having an interdisciplinary approach would make me more niche and competitive (easing my concerns about not being competitive if I don't go to a Berkeley). I am hoping to use the next 5 years to gain relevant research and networking experience in fields that could relate to public health. #3: Will I be unhappy working in a lab that has research techniques that do not particularly interest me, but is using those techniques to answer research questions that I find fascinating? I haven't particularly loved FTIR, NMR, HPLC, etc, but I've always found ways to use them answer questions that interest me during my undergraduate experience. If you made it this far, thank you! I am happy to give back to this forum with advice about what made my application to this program a success.
  11. johncena2011

    Law and Economics (JD/MA or MS)

    I'm interested in studying Economics along with Law. I will be a student at Notre Dame Law School and I was thinking about applying around to MS or MA programs in Economics after my 1L. The schools that I were thinking of are Johns Hopkins, Georgetown, GW, Tufts, NYU, Michigan, Duke, Stanford, and Columbia since Notre Dame does not have a MA/MS Economics program. Would this be wise, since it is my interest, wanted to work around government and policy, or possibly the UN< IMF, or World Bank after graduation?
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