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Found 52 results

  1. Hello all! For those who are in an I/O Psychology PhD or Masters' program, or who has finished, what is your current job or what job/career are you hoping to have? I'm very interested and curious in knowing, since I want to pursue further education in I/O Psychology and I would love to know everyone's jobs/careers! Thanks!
  2. tunic_youth

    MLIS job prospect?

    Hi everybody! I was thinking of retraining and getting into LIS field (have a BA in Art History and MA in Cultural Management from non-US universities, with experience in museums, non-profits project work and curating). The thing is, this time I need to be very careful in choosing next studies/career, because I want to avoid being unemployed or underpaid again So, what are the odds of getting a job in the field after an MA? How is the job market for librarians and related professions? P.S. Been reading data from https://www.bls.gov/ooh/education-training-and-library/librarians.htm, but interested to hear your experience
  3. I'm an international student from India and I've been offered admission to Duke and USC for an MS in BME. I've spoken to a lot of people from both colleges, and I seem to get the general idea that USC is a great place primarily because of its location in California where there are a lot of BT/Biomed companies. But I'm still pretty torn between them, since Duke has a great program and offers me the flexibility to really explore what I like. As somebody who wants to enter the industry, I'm not sure if I should pick the much lower ranked program/good location, or great program/okay location. Any sights?
  4. bassach

    I/O Psych Job Hunt Experience

    I am about to commence my graduate program in Fall 2018. I wanted people's feedback on a few questions as I look forward to applying for jobs and internships. What was your experience looking for jobs after completing the I/O Psych Masters? Is the degree recognized across the nation, are the positions highly competitive, etc.? What are some suggestions you would offer in terms of what skills companies are looking for in an entry-level position? From your experience, what are some mistakes you made while looking for jobs, that you think could have been avoided? What was your opening salary for an entry-level I/O Psych position? What skills are highly sought after in an employee with an I/O degree? Overall, are there any regrets for pursuing I/O Psychology? I know the questions are pretty broad, but I can use all the info you may be able to share. Thank you for any feedback.
  5. Hello everyone, In the last week before the decision deadline, I am debating between a PhD offer and a funded masters offer. The PhD is fairly low tier/low ranked school for my discipline, and my adviser is just in the beginning of their career. My academic goal and my current interests are of course to do research at the doctoral level, so many people are confused why I am having any dilemma over the two. My problem is that the PhD program, for my specific department, has had questionable placement history. It's not so much that it's "bad" placements-- people were able to find jobs. They are almost all in teaching institutions and no longer doing research. While it's reassuring that many people were able to find jobs, it's kind of discouraging that no one from any of the graduating classes has been able to break into any R1 schools. I also asked about any students that have been able to obtain post docs, and so far it seems like only one student from our department has done so. Again, it kind of concerns me. The one big career positive that the school likes to talk about, however, is the prospect of industry jobs. It seems that people have had more success with getting research positions within some prestigious tech companies, but the recruitment and placement data they're referring to is heavily made up of cognitive grads. The PhD acceptance I received is for a discipline outside of cognitive or human factors psychology, so I'm concerned that I won't be able to make my work applicable enough to get hired by these industries. I know that the motivation behind doing a PhD should be the love of research in an academic setting, but I have to make sure I meet in the middle between my passions and my (and my family's) need for financial stability. Also forgot to mention-- the program isn't fully funded, at least not guaranteed. Everyone says they're able to get funding for the years that aren't guaranteed through other means, but this is kind of scary, especially when I know that many comparable universities usually offer full funding. So now that I've laid out the context of this issue, the dilemma is basically: I'm concerned that I'm going into a PhD program with a very narrow pathway for myself to get a job worth the return of the time/labor/opportunity cost of a PhD AND allow me to continue doing research beyond my degree. Specifically, it's highly unlikely at this moment that I would get a tenure track job at an R1 school from this program. Of course, I know this is a difficult position to obtain from ANY PhD given how rough the academic job market is, but it's demoralizing to see that no one from our department has been able to get into an R1 school, with or without post doc. What I would need to do, is go into this program with at least the idea to make my work versatile enough to eventually land me an industry job in case, but that's difficult to do as a non-cognitive, non-human factors student. On top of this, pursuing such a research trajectory is very different from what I originally told my adviser, and may blatantly seem like I'm trying to go after industry jobs. Also, I'm still in undergrad and I realized through this application process that my research interests have changed quite a bit. I didn't really know what was out there for me to consider, and now I'm rethinking the research match between me and my potential adviser. This is also another reason why I feel like I should gain some more research experience and reapply. Given all of these concerns, my other option is to turn down the offer and reapply after doing some intensive work to make my application a lot better. This is with the hope that I'll get into programs with better placement records. That way I don't have to feel like there's only one possible career path that is realistically available for me to feel financially secure about. Right now, I'm thinking of doing this through taking on the funded research masters as this program has a reputation for doing well in preparing students for quality PhD programs. I am also going to make sure I spend my summers taking up any volunteer research positions and programs, in case the masters isn't research-heavy enough for my purposes. Am I being too naive about this? Or conversely, am I thinking too much? Thank you all in advance! I'm really sorry for how long this post is. I need to learn how to write concisely...
  6. I'm new here, so I apologize if I ask too many questions! Basically, I'm currently a senior at NYU and in May I'll be graduating with a B.A. in Math and Psychology. Going into my senior year, I had been planning on applying to several Ph.D. programs in Data Science and Statistics and my career goal was to be a data scientist. However, upon meeting with the professor whose lab I do research in, he stated that it would be very difficult for me to get into any Ph.D. program with only a year of undergraduate research experience. So, I applied to 6 Masters programs and the Ph.D. in Data Science program at NYU (this has been my top choice since sophomore year so no way I wasn't going to give it a shot!). Fast forward to now, I made it up to the interview for the Ph.D. program, but yesterday I got an email saying I was offered admission into the Master's program in the Center for Data Science, and that I am not eligible for any scholarships. I have also been admitted to the Master's of Engineering in Computer Science program at Cornell Tech, as well as a couple of other M.S. programs at NYU, and I'm waiting to hear back from the three other programs. Here's where my questions come up. As I think about it more and more, the program at Cornell Tech becomes more appealing. For one thing, I think it's a more versatile degree. They have data science courses I could take, and with the degree itself I'd be a candidate for software engineer positions. As such, after completing the degree I'd likely be able to go down either route, albeit the data science route would be a bit tougher with this degree than with the M.S. in Data Science. However, I've also found jobs in software engineering to be more appealing lately. I think around my junior year of college I started to realize a software engineer career seemed like a good fit for my interests, but by that point I thought it was too late in the game to switch routes unless I got another Bachelor's in Comp Sci - who knew! Also, I've been completely lost at where to look for scholarships. I applied to one that Cornell Tech sent out the application to, but I haven't received any merit scholarships from the programs I've been admitted to. That being said, even without scholarships, the Cornell Tech degree would be approximately $8,000 less right off the bat. Additionally, it's a one year program, as opposed to the one at NYU which is a two year program. Is it presumptuous of me to think it'd be reasonable to take out $40-50k in loans, with the expectation that with the Computer Science engineering degree I'll likely be able to make decent money as a software engineer in NYC not long after graduating next spring? If it helps, I'll be graduating from undergrad with about $10,500 in loans, and if I do get a well-paying job after grad school my plan is to live as if I'm making $40k a year until my loans are paid off. I'm the first in my family to go to college, let alone grad school, so any advice is greatly appreciated! I've heard that some companies will pay for you to get a M.Eng., but honestly at this point I'd rather get the degree first since I don't think I'm qualified for many tech jobs currently. As a recap, my two main questions are: 1. Is it a smart decision to do a Master of Engineering in C.S. at Cornell Tech when I'm open to becoming either a software engineer or data scientist? 2. Is it reasonable to assume I'll be able to get a decent job with a M.Eng. degree in C.S. and that I'd be able to pay of ~$60k in loans in a reasonable amount of time? Thank you!
  7. Hey everyone! I could really use your help: I'm trying to decide on an English or Comparative Literature program and am curious as to whether any of you think that placement records are an important factor in deciding? If so, how do you determine what a good placement record is? Thirdly, why are some schools better at placing students than others? I'm finding this very confusing because strong placement records sometimes don't correspond to the school's level of prestige. For example, I noticed that at Brown's English department, only 7% of graduates in the last 4 years got tenure-track jobs. And at Rutgers, 68% of graduates went on to secure tenure-track jobs.
  8. I've recently been admitted to an MA program with an 20K stipend. I know this is generous for an MA program but I am trying to gauge my loan and student debt prospects. Anyone else with a similar stipend? Has anyone found any other ways to get funding? Has anyone managed to get scholarships that are separate from the particular university or department? Any jobs? Did you even need a loan?
  9. Which departments in the humanities are the best and worst for landing academic jobs? I got my master's in English literature, but have been thinking about getting my PhD in history or sociology. Three professors (in English and History) strongly advised me to go into English, which apparently is one of the best (albeit still extremely competitive) for academic jobs. They also said History is one of the most difficult. How true is this? Is there any way to validate these claims?
  10. Hi, I'm in my second semester as a Ph.D. student in Comparative Literature. I know some people might think that it's too early for me to start worrying about what to do to get hired, others might be thinking that it's never too early, others might be saying "you're a comparative lit. major, there are no jobs" lol, but please just stick with me a moment. I'm looking for advice on how I can become a more competitive applicant when applying for assistant professor jobs (and similar jobs) after I finish my Ph.D. I'm technically first-generation college student (my parents dropped out of college, and my much older sister went to college later through a continuing studies program and received a masters online. However, she doesn't work in academia) so I'm pretty lost here about how all of this works and what's attractive to universities. I'm trying to figure out what I can do to stand out. I've been told that I should go to conferences, so I applied to two and got accepted. Are conferences helpful or do you feel like it doesn't make much of a difference? Should I try publishing more? Researching (you know, outside of my future dissertation work)? If so, how do I start approaching professors or institutions, in general, to start doing that? After graduation, should I apply to a post-doc program? If so, do you know of any stand out ones that I should aim for or even what people look for when hiring post-docs or do you just feel like post-docs are unnecessary? My fellowship requires me to teach one semester gratis. Should I attempt at teaching more? Older students in my department have suggested getting a masters in another department (i.e. English, French, Anthropology, Theatre, etc.) to further diversify myself and make more valuable connections, but I'm not sure if tagging on another year or two to finish another degree for the sake of networking is that beneficial especially when comparative literature programs require you to take courses outside of your department anyway. Should I start building more experiences outside of academia (In undergrad, I was an EIC of a publication for a year, I've also worked in publishing, tutoring, mentoring, and led a social justice/community service non-profit organization for a year, and I minored and worked in social media for a bit-- should I keep doing more things like that in grad school or is it time to refocus and just build on one or two things?) If I sound really young, lost, and a little overwhelmed, it's because I am. I graduated from a private university with a degree in English (writing) in three years and was accepted straight-way into this Ph.D. program when I was 20 going on 21 years old. My program requires 48-course credits, after this semester (I entered in Fall 2017 right now I'm in Spring 2018 semester) I would have 24 credits so I'm approaching that halfway mark with my coursework (I probably need to slow down a bit, but I can't hold a job on this fellowship minus departmental related research/internships relevant to my career so I don't have anything really going on at the moment). I'm required to take a minimum 9 credits Fall/Spring each and a minimum 6 credits in the summer so I'll be at 30 credits when the Fall 2018 semester commences. I'm not at a prestigious ivy league school; I'm in a very small program at a pretty large public university. I don't feel like me being young with a good fellowship is enough to really stand out. So if anyone knows about ways I can further build my CV and experiences to become a better applicant for future jobs, that info would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance!
  11. ineedcoffee

    Job Boards?

    Unfortunately, I haven't been contacted by the only school I have interviewed with; however, I've come to terms with it (ish-- it changes hourly, lol). Saying this, does anyone know of any good listserves or job boards for RA's/Fellowships/Lab Coordinator positions that I could get on or look at to help find my plan B? I have a Master's Degree so I'd prefer something that is not just Bachelor's level. What have you guys done in your years between application cycles? Any tips/advice/websites would be greatly appreciated! Thanks!
  12. I am starting this thread for those interested in discussing the future of the field of comparative literature. Here are some possible topics: Is it a dying field? If so, will its members be absorbed into English, language departments, etc.? Is it growing? If so, where and how? How is the job market? E.g. I have heard the market is terrible for women, but men are finding positions in comp/lit, English, and language departments. Can anyone confirm/deny this rumor? Looking forward to hearing your perspectives.
  13. I got an admit for Information Systems course in UMCP. I couldn't find any reviews about it. Can anyone help me with it? How good is the course? How are the job opportunities?Should I go with it? As I have to submit 1000$ to reserve my seat by 15th of Feb. Any help is appreciated. Thank you.
  14. Hi all, new here.I will be a second year MSW student this year and I am wondering when the proper time is to begin applying for jobs in this field? I want to get a head start and hopefully have a job before graduation, but I don't want to apply too soon either. I was thinking of putting applications in around October-November. Is this too early? Any advice is much appreciated! Thanks.
  15. snoringdog

    When to Apply for Jobs?

    I'm a BSW student in my senior year with next semester being my field placement. I'm not going to graduate school after graduating, and (like most people) I'd ideally like to have a job by the time I graduate. While I love my BSW program, we haven't really talked much about applying for jobs - the process, when to do it, etc. I know people from other majors who are in the process of looking for jobs now and this brought me to this question - when should I start applying for jobs?
  16. justpayingthebills

    How to tell committee you're exiting academia?

    Hi there, was wondering if anyone else out there is finishing up the PhD and thinking about realistic alternative paths. I am finishing up a Humanities PhD in a field with very grim employment prospects. I have been wrestling with the idea of leaving my program throughout the process but have finally (by the support of loved ones), made it to the end. I have also applied to several positions and had no luck so far. I have never had a frank conversation with my committee about my doubts, and they presume I am going to continue in academia no matter if "my first year on the market is rough." Anyone else in this situation-- i.e., afraid to tell their committee they are leaving academia? Does anyone have any advice? Best of luck to everyone out there in the same boat, and to anyone who decides to continue or decides to leave. <3
  17. besixdouze

    Figuring out what you're qualified for

    Hi, everyone: Just wondering if there are any good resources online or elsewhere for someone to figure out what they're even qualified to do. I ask because I've reached burnout with adjuncting. I've got two terminal degrees with honors from good universities (not that that matters outside of academia) and 8 years experience in higher ed with a couple of years in government (doing human rights advocacy) and church. Because I haven't published a book yet and I don't have a PhD, I haven't had much luck finding a secure teaching job with a sustainable wage, and because I'm not ordained (yet--though I'd like to change that), I haven't had much luck finding a church positions. My plan for now is to move closer to home (I came far from family for my MFA) and work on seeing if I'm priest material/hopefully doing some chaplain-ing, but until then I need to figure out what sorts of jobs I'm eligible for that would pay the bills. My educational and professional backgrounds are in English/writing, religion/ministry and LGBTQ+ interests. Lots of teaching, lots of proofreading/editing/publishing, and ministry/activism. I used LinkedIn, Glassdoor, Indeed and various others but have not found them to be super helpful, but whether that's the platform or because my skills are not in high demand is another question. I went to the career center and spoke with a career advisor at both my master's programs' respected universities but did not find a great deal of specifics, though I received good "you're worth something and you can do it" pep talks. All ideas welcome and appreciated. Thanks in advance.
  18. Torbjornen

    Paying for graduate school

    One of the greatest things about Bio medical PhD programs, is the fact it is paid for, plus you get a stipend. Even so, I anticipate needing more than the stipend will provide. What advice is out there about taking out student loans (federal or private) or other ways of financing graduate education? I have done the standard google searches, so I am mostly looking for what people have experienced personally and what their recommendations are.
  19. So here's my issue. I'm about to get my second master degree, the first one a regular MSc and the second one a MRes. Over the course of this time I have conducted and taken part in a number of research projects. All of them have involved extensive fieldwork abroad. Now I am looking for jobs that are related to the practical application of my knowledge. (Btw, I'm in the development field as you can tell from my profile) It was never my goal to stay within academia, but I saw these two masters as a chance to build on my skillset and I am convinced these skills are transferable to the 'applied/practical field'. But this is my dilemma: The last three positions on my resume basically all say "researcher" or "research assistant" in some form. I know that my experiences are more than that, and I want to reframe them so it highlights the "international" and "field experience" aspect rather than the research aspect. Has anyone had do this before, and how did you solve it? Thanks!
  20. jess5822

    Advice on jobs

    I'm currently working as a direct staff support for a home of adults that have intellectual disabilities. I thought I was going to be working a lot on communication with them but that part is pretty much 25% of it. The rest I am basically a caregiver-- cleaning the house, cooking, helping them with personal management, hygiene, etc. I'm looking into other jobs. I got an interview for an assistant to a teacher at a preschool but I'm not sure if that will better my chances at getting into grad school. I'm kinda having second thoughts about quitting the job search and sticking with the one I have but I'm not entirely sure. Anybody have any advice?
  21. Hi everyone! I wasn't exactly sure whether to file this under Professional Studies or Social Sciences so hopefully it reaches the right people! I was just accepted into a counseling program and am having a bad case of indecision. Technically, I have about a year until I really need to declare this but since I'm trying to get work experience and hate having loose ends, I figured maybe you guys could try to help me now. The programs/careers that I'm stuck between are School Counseling and Clinical Mental Health. On the school's website, they even seem to be selling Mental Health more as they list a bunch of different options for it and only talk about the classes needed for the School Counseling page. Anyway, my issue is that I live in NJ and this is a tough area to get a job in anywhere really and schools tend to be who you know. My boyfriend works for the Board of Ed as a custodian so potential in there but who knows. What's holding me back from deciding besides potential jobs is what the actual work environments are like. My concern with school counseling is that I'll be stuck doing all administrative work and barely get to interact with students other than college admissions and class schedules if I'm working in a high school. I want to actually be able to counsel people and feel like I reached them. Moving on to Mental Health, what is it like to work in this field? How stressful is it?How difficult would it be for me to find a job being my Bachelor's is actually in English? I currently volunteer for a crisis hotline and am trying to get some work experience (though I'm not sure where the best place to go with no experience is) but I know some places may be weary to hire someone who didn't have an undergrad degree in a social science. Sorry for rambling everyone, just trying to figure things out!
  22. Oatmeal Durkheim

    Academic Job Mobility in the European Context

    In the United States it is not uncommon to apply to academic jobs all over the country. Personally, I do not know a single person who limited his or her search to just one state (i.e. Massachusetts). That being said, the language of instruction and the key aspects of academic culture remain the same coast to coast. In comparison, what is the situation like in Europe, particularly Scandinavia and Switzerland? For example, given that the population of Denmark is comparable in size to that of Massachusetts, how does this affect the academic job market? Is it standard practice for PhDs & lecturers/postdocs located in Denmark to search for their first career placement across Europe [and beyond]? Or do they search for employment primarily on the national academic job market? How do the national differences in language/academic culture fit into this equation? Background: I’m considering PhD/Academic Career in Europe. Ideally, I would like to learn the local language and assimilate as much as possible during the PhD. Given this long-term effort, I would prefer to continue on in the same country following graduation. I’m especially interested in hearing from those with experience in the social sciences and humanities (working or studying in Denmark, Finland, Norway, Sweden, or Switzerland). However, please consider contributing even if you do not fit this particular set of criteria. My own experience is in Cult/Soc Anthropology (USA).
  23. For a long time my background was in a VERY specialized field in the museum sector (conservation). There are VERY few jobs. After my husband and I moved to upstate New York I was extremely lucky to find a good job in my field, but it was an hour and a half drive one way from our house, which we were/are not willing to move from for various reasons. The drive eventually became physically, emotionally, and financially draining, and when the opportunity came up to leave to do a funded PhD I took it. Now, halfway through my program, I need to start thinking about what might be next, and suddenly find myself with several options where I have been used to having literally zero or none for my entire working life. I've been thinking/ talking with my husband about these options and thought that I would look here for some advice as well. Facts: I don't need to make a ton of money. My husband has a good job, but I do still need to pay off my student loans and have a fallback in case anything ever happens with his job. Moving IS NOT an option. The following options are being considered because there is potential for me to be able to do them in my current city. Please do not recommend that I join a nationwide TTP search or move to L.A. or something. I am under absolutely zero delusions that a tenure track position is going to be an option. Sure, if one comes up in my area that would be great, but my work is very specialized and tenure was never a hard goal for me. Similarly, I don't care about losing the "prestige" of academia, or about people potentially looking down on my for choosing "alt-ac." I have different priorities. We want something that will be flexible and allow me to spend time with/ be available for our (future) children. We have no hard and fast rules for this; we're not anti-daycare or anything like that, but we do want some options that will allow time off for vacations, some afternoons at home, family activities, etc. My husband travels for work and often has chunks of free time when we would be able to spend time together. I have contacts in both sectors, who have suggested that I consider these options. Basically the two main options are: A combination of part-time museum work and teaching adjunct courses. This will allow me to keep my feet in both worlds that I love: teaching and museums. When the kids are older this could potentially transition back into full-time museum work if I choose. One of the biggest motivations for doing the PhD was to get teaching experience and find out if I really loved it as much as I thought I would. I do, so continuing to teach would be great. Teaching at a private high school. This is appealing because there are MANY schools in my city. Several of them pride themselves on having an interdisciplinary curriculum which is exactly my wheelhouse. One of my contacts at a local school seemed very excited about my background, which combines art, chemistry/science, and history. I have always been attracted to the community atmosphere of K-12 schools (my mom was a teacher), so this option really appeals to me for that reason. Of course, the idea of long holiday and summer breaks is also quite appealing. Unfortunately, because of New York's rules, private schools would be my only option since I don't have a teaching certificate. I know what museums are like, so I think I am mostly looking for a conversation about the K-12 option. Has anyone gone from PhD to teaching high school? Do you know anyone who has done this? I understand that I am largely uninformed about how this might play out in the "real world." Feel free to inform me (that's why I am here), but please be kind about it. Thanks in advance for your thoughts!
  24. anxious_achiever

    Switching to a CS masters in Canada

    Hello. I graduated from Stanford University after a MS in Chemical Engineering and failed to find a job. Reason - my major isn't the best when it comes to jobs. I have a good GPA (3.75/4.0) and did my undergraduation from a top univ in India (IIT-KGP) with a good GPA again (8.61/10.) I am considering switching to CS by the following route - doing assistantships with professors in various universities for a couple of years to get recos and then applying to Canada for an MS in CS. I have two questions. 1) Has anyone done something similar? I get the feeling that getting a prof to say yes to someone with no background is tough, but I see no other way to get my career in CS started. How difficult is it to get a research project with a prof in any decent Indian univ? I'm willing to go unpaid as well. 2) Do I stand a chance of getting into good univs? (Waterloo, UBC and the like). I don't want to go to an average university. Kindly help me out.
  25. jess5822

    Advice on jobs

    I'm currently working as a direct staff support for a home of adults that have intellectual disabilities. I thought a majority of the job was going to be on communication with them but that consist of 25%-30% of the job. The rest I am basically a caregiver--cleaning the house, cooking, helping them with personal management, hygiene, etc. I'm looking into other jobs. I got an interview for an assistant to a teacher at a preschool but I'm not sure if that will better my chances of getting into grad school. I'm having second thoughts about the job search and just sticking with the job I have. I have a second job and between that and this other job, I don't have time to shadow SLPs. When I asked what I needed to improve on, the admissions said my GRE could use some work. I'm studying for the GRE but I feel that that is not enough and I don't want to waste my time with this job and not doing something else. Any advice would be great!
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