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Found 5 results

  1. Hi all, I've been doing some reading on this topic, and I keep seeing that some states give LCSWs more "power," while others give more power to LPCs, and in other states there's minimal difference, etc.. My question is how do I find this information for the states I am interested in? If it helps, I'm looking at schools in Texas, New York, Colorado, and Massachusetts. I'm just not sure where to look. Thanks for any help.
  2. Hi everyone! I'm getting started and planning ahead for the fall when I'll be applying to PSU's Counselor Education program, and I was wondering if anyone had any words of advice -- I applied to the PSU MSW program last year and wasn't accepted, which actually turned out to be fine because it made me reflect on exactly what program to pursue, and I've settled on an MFT Counselor track in the Graduate School of Education at PSU. That said, the application process last year was so stressful and it was obviously tough to be rejected, so I'm trying to come back much stronger this year. I have an undergraduate GPA of 3.4, and I have a bachelor's degree in psychology with a minor in sociology. I've volunteered in a domestic violence shelter for about a year (it will be 1.5 years by the time applications are due) doing direct-service work with participants, and have worked in administration at a couple of nonprofits for the last 6 years. I'm hoping to take the prerequisite 'Intro to Counseling' course at PSU this fall as a non-degree seeking student to get a little more face-time at the university and possibly make some connections there (the admissions advisor I spoke to said it was a good starting point). Does anyone have any wisdom to share? For the MSW program, the piece that I wasn't fully aware of was how much emphasis they put on direct social work experience, and I think that's why I wasn't accepted. I'm curious to know if there are any pieces like that in the GSE Counselor master's program that I should try and address now. Thanks!
  3. Hi everyone, Thank you for taking the time to answer my questions. It is not my intention to put down any profession or discipline. I'm just confused and trying to seek advice. This may be long, so please bear with me. I'm 32 years old, and have an undergrad degree in Psychology and a master's in environmental safety. I've worked in mental health for several years, and recently decided that I want to return to school to obtain a graduate degree in the human services field. My goal is to work as a therapist and one day have my own practice working with the adult population. I keep reading and hearing that it's best to become a LCSW rather than an LPC because an MSW degree is far more marketable, profitable and recognized as opposed to a master's in Mental Health or Clinical Psychology for example. I've been accepted into an MSW program with a Micro concentration, which will begin this Fall. However, I'm having second thoughts. My main concern: Does the Social Work philosophy align well with my personal philosophy? Sometimes I get the impression that Social Work tends to, for the most part, "blame" the client's problems (like oppression or the government, etc.). I've come to understand (through my own hardships and life experiences and that of others') that looking at outside factors as the cause for our misfortunes keeps people from accessing their Higher Self, if you will. I guess you could say that I'm more into Positive Psychology. Rather than looking at how messed up the government is and perceiving ourselves as being oppressed, I believe it's important to take radical responsibility for our circumstances by looking within ourselves, and that focusing on the good in our lives will help transform the areas we are not happy about. This is all assuming a person has their basic needs met. I would never expect someone who is homeless or has nothing to eat to work on accessing their Higher Self. But basically, I'm not sure that my personal values and outlook are consistent with those of the Social Work discipline. And so I wonder if the field of Psychology would be a better fit than the field of Social Work. I'm torn because I've already been accepted into the MSW program and would have to wait about 6 months to get into a graduate psych program that's more than $10k more expensive than the MSW program. On one hand, I wonder if I'm simply mistaken about the Social Work discipline and judging it wrong. On the other, I wonder if I'd be making a mistake by getting my MSW versus a Psych degree. I know that an MSW program is more marketable and offers greater job security, but I want to make sure my values align with my field of study. My questions: Do you think that my values and beliefs are too different from the Social Work values and philosophy? Am I better off just waiting to apply to a Psychology program instead? Am I overthinking things? Should I go the MSW route and just make my practice what I want it to be (Positive Psychology approach)? Thanks again for your time!
  4. Hi everyone, Thank you for taking the time to answer my questions. It is not my intention to put down any profession or discipline. I'm just confused and trying to seek advice. This may be long, so please bear with me. I'm 32 years old, and have an undergrad degree in Psychology and a master's in environmental safety. I've worked in mental health for several years, and recently decided that I want to return to school to obtain a graduate degree in the human services field. My goal is to work as a therapist and one day have my own practice working with the adult population. I keep reading and hearing that it's best to become a LCSW rather than an LPC because an MSW degree is far more marketable, profitable and recognized as opposed to a master's in Mental Health or Clinical Psychology for example. I've been accepted into an MSW program with a Micro concentration, which will begin this Fall. However, I'm having second thoughts. My main concern: Does the Social Work philosophy align well with my personal philosophy? Sometimes I get the impression that Social Work tends to, for the most part, "blame" the client's problems (like oppression or the government, etc.). I've come to understand (through my own hardships and life experiences and that of others') that looking at outside factors as the cause for our misfortunes keeps people from accessing their Higher Self, if you will. I guess you could say that I'm more into Positive Psychology. Rather than looking at how messed up the government is and perceiving ourselves as being oppressed, I believe it's important to take radical responsibility for our circumstances by looking within ourselves, and that focusing on the good in our lives will help transform the areas we are not happy about. This is all assuming a person has their basic needs met. I would never expect someone who is homeless or has nothing to eat to work on accessing their Higher Self. But basically, I'm not sure that my personal values and outlook are consistent with those of the Social Work discipline. And so I wonder if the field of Psychology would be a better fit than the field of Social Work. I'm torn because I've already been accepted into the MSW program and would have to wait about 6 months to get into a graduate psych program that's more than $10k more expensive than the MSW program. On one hand, I wonder if I'm simply mistaken about the Social Work discipline and judging it wrong. On the other, I wonder if I'd be making a mistake by getting my MSW versus a Psych degree. I know that an MSW program is more marketable and offers greater job security, but I want to make sure my values align with my field of study. My questions: Do you think that my values and beliefs are too different from the Social Work values and philosophy? Am I better off just waiting to apply to a Psychology program instead? Am I overthinking things? Should I go the MSW route and just make my practice what I want it to be (Positive Psychology approach)? Thanks again for your time!
  5. Hello! This is my first post here and I'm looking for some feedback, advice, and your experience in the fields of behavior analysis and psychotherapy. I have a career dilemma. Long time ago I got a BS in Animal Bio, then became interested in Psych and behavior. Now I have been working as an RBT (registered behavior technician) for 4 years with children on autism spectrum, and provide in-home services related to problem behaviors, and debating whether I should get a masters in applied behavior analysis (ABA) or get a masters/PsyD and practice as a therapist. ABA is a fast growing and changing field right now, and supposed to pay better than an MFT/MSW for example. I am extremely conflict avoidant, and don't enjoy crisis situations, although I have become more or less accustomed to them, working with kids with autism and at a group home with troubled youth. While I understand all jobs have ups and downs, to be blunt, I want an "easy" job. I like the job of the LPC I see at the daycare who walks around and establishes rapport with kids, and counsels them on as needed basis. She does not do crisis intervention, or discipline them in anyway. I also LOVE the idea of working as a therapist and doing play therapy with kids, who come to my office, so I don't have to make house calls (and deal with the sometimes unstable home environment). The downside of that is that I won't know if the job of a therapist is really for me until I have the actual degree. The therapists that I've interviewed or have seen sometimes seem really burnt out. I don't want an MFT because the couples fighting can get pretty intense. I want to get an MA in Mental Health, but worried about state-to-state licensure, since I do not know where I will live yet (I currently live in Hawaii, but my husband is applying to jobs out of state, so we're not planning to stay here forever). I have a love-hate relationship with the ABA field (applied behavior analysis) because it is akin to animal training, and while effective, I feel it lacks emphasis on empathy and making a connection with the child (sort of what Dr. Laura Markham's blog ahaparenting.com talks about), but I feel it would be unethical for me to suggest this to clients, because it's not really ABA. To me ABA seems that it's lacking depth and is too robotic with it's reinforcement principles and constricted with its application in autism (supposedly it has other applications, but it's really rare to find a job outside of the autism diagnosis). I also don't like the possibility of injury - kids have hit, bit, spat, and swore at me, they may be teenagers and bigger than me - I am a 5'2 female with history of domestic violence, so this scares me. I can't tell you how many times I've come home crying because of these aggressive behaviors I've had to deal with, and I'd blame myself, there's little support within the profession, and it's just a very difficult job. I've had a PsyD therapist tell me my job is so much harder than hers. What I love about ABA is the one-on-one relationship I get to build with my client. I also love working with kids, especially younger ones, making that connection with them, being their coach, seeing them grow and overcome challenges with my help is SO rewarding. I'm also good at this job, I feel like I have a knack for it (I've had supervisors tell me this), and it is an in-demand field. SO I've been sitting on this dilemma for a year or two now, and feel a lot of pressure to make a decision already, I am 29 years old, and desperately wanting to to be financially independent and get on with my life with a permanent job, that I only see for myself after grad school. I know this was long, sorry about that. Really appreciate any help you may have, and feel free to ask questions.
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