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  1. Hi! I'm based out of India, graduated in 2020 with a Bachelors degree with a less than ideal 2:2, but I've since done a Parliamentary Research internship, finished multiple relevant certificate courses and short term programmes, worked with non-profits for a few months, and completed two internships of six months each with the United Nations -both abroad, one of which was at the Secretariat in NYC. I understand that Oxbridge is a pipe dream, and scholarships wouldn't be an option since they focus on grades (I'm willing to fully self fund), but that being said, would my experience give me a fighting chance for an MA/MSc in International Relations at LSE, King's or UCL?
  2. Hi! Has anyone that apply for LSE MSc Behavioral Sciences for this year (2022) heard back from the program? Especially those that apply in late Jan 2022 Thanks!
  3. Hello all, International with a non-US degree here, I'm applying to several places between the US and the UK for a Mid East degree: MPhil Modern Mid East Studies, Oxford MA Modern History, LSE* AM Mid East Studies, Harvard MA Arab Studies, Georgetown *LSE's new history degree would allow me a pick of modules that could craft an interdisciplinary degree and pad my CV for a PhD (also, the UK's new postgrad visa scheme is very enticing) Anyone have any impressions of the above programs? Anything I should add, or should know? Very keen on hearing from people in similar straits or, better yet, who have gone through Mid East studies postgrad. Should also add that I am: a native Arabic speaker; keen on learning Persian; and very much hope that this degree would position me for a PhD program down the line.
  4. Hi! I am currently looking into the different courses offered by the LSE in economics/environment/development and I wanted to know if any of you have done or have feedback on any of the following courses : - MSc Development Management - MSc Environment and Development - MSc Environmental Economics and Climate Change - MSc Environmental Policy and Regulation - MSc Political Economy of Late Development - MSc Political Science and Political Economy - MSc European and International Public Policy Thank you in advance, it would be very helpful in my academic choices!
  5. Hello, I am about to go crazy. Please help me!!! I really need to decide between these programmes ASAP: LSE Comparative Politics (1 Year), Sciences Po Political Science(2 Years) or The Graduate Institute Geneva (IHEID) International Relations/Political Science (2 Years) Costs will be similar for me; with partial scholarships and the respective costs of living, overall costs are evening out. After the master’s degree (in an ideal world) I plan to apply for a DPhil in USA, I am not sure which one will be the best fit. I am slightly closer to IHEID as the classrooms are relatively small (35 students max.) and it is a 2 year programme. But Sciences Po is also 2 years, unlike 1 year LSE. I have 2 main concerns: Which one would prepare me best for pursuing a DPhil? And in case I give up or change my mind or basically get depressed which one has the best reputation to find a decent job in the third sector, IOs etc. I will be really happy if you can help me out :)))
  6. Hi all, I understand that both the MSc Economics and MSc Econometrics and Mathematical Economics (EME) offers from LSE come along with a conditional offer to its MRes/PhD programme, which requires a Distinction to be attained for the MSc programme. Would anyone be able to advise on the likelihood of proceeding from the EME programme to the MRes/PhD programme please, namely the proportion of the EME cohort attaining distinction over the past few years, please? Also, upon entry into the MRes/PhD programme, I understand from the programme regulation that there may be certain exemptions and/or shifting of some of the courses so that the papers can be taken earlier. Does this mean that it is possible to attempt completing the MRes/PhD within 4 years instead of 5 years? Appreciate the advice! Thanks!
  7. Hi folks, For a Masters in international affairs and/or security - which program do you feel is best? I've been working as a program officer at an international peace organization for the past two years, and have recently finished up a BA in political science with a 3.94 GPA. I speak French, English, and Spanish, so language isn't an issue in terms of the francophone community in Geneva (I did my undergrad in French). I'm looking at applying to these schools in the fall of 2021 or 2022, depending on how the pandemic is, and will be working in my current role until then and as a research associate at a security-oriented think-tank in South Asia. The reason I'm putting the question forward is because of jobs and employability within the peace/conflict studies world - Geneva is widely regarded as the centre of the peacemaking world. London and DC obviously have some great opportunities as well, and a great name. I've heard that DC has a lot of jobs but the competition is cutthroat and often times you're stuck with a position you're overqualified for - not sure how true this is, but it scared me. What do you folks think? How do the namesakes of the schools weigh out, and where is best for someone looking to work in peacebuilding and/or security spaces, and not necessarily as a government analyst? TIA!
  8. Hey everyone, I'm new to this forum and have never posted in places like this before so I apologise in advance if this is the wrong place for my post. I'm a Canadian student at an okay university in Canada. I would like to pursue a master's degree in IR/global politics/public policy or something along those lines. Ideally, I would like to study in Europe, preferably at LSE. I am also open to applying to other schools like Sciences Po, King's College, and maybe even the Graduate Institute in Switzerland. I have a year of school left and my cumulative GPA is a tad bit under 3.4 but I am hoping my extracurriculars can compensate for this. I am majoring in political science and have taken very basic courses in economics and quantitative research methods. I speak three Asian languages (one of them fluently), French, and English. Extracurricular Activities: -wrote articles for online international relations publications -served as a Regional Director for an international affairs publication -started an IR publication at my uni -served as president of a major political club -did model UN -currently a student mentor -currently an advisor at a think tank -volunteer at a legal research centre Work Experience: -I have roughly 2 years of work experience -interned on programs, policy, and community engagement for a royal charity -interned at the federal foreign affairs ministry in the international trade section helping businesses export and in the FDI team I don't intend to study beyond a master's degree and plan to work in government for some years and then maybe and international org like the UN or in government relations for a company. I was wondering if I could get some honest input on what my chances could be based on your experience or based on the experiences of people you know. Open to hearing any advice/suggestions you have and looking forward to hearing your experiences! Thanks!
  9. For all those waiting it out
  10. Hi there! I received an offer for the MSc in Political Theory at LSE 2020/21 and am currently looking into housing options. I am a bit confused as to whether I would have to choose an hall that has accommodation for 50 weeks, or whether I would only be required to be on-site for the 30/39 that most halls provide. The webpage of my programme states that it is 12 months full time, but I cannot find anything as to whether that would actually entail 12 months of teaching in London? If anyone has an idea about how the academic year is structured and whether I should try and get housing for more than 30 weeks, it would be much appreciated! Cheers - Johanna
  11. A thread for political science and global affairs applicants 2020! A place to share worries, post decisions, and wish each other good luck!
  12. Hi all! I am graduating in December from a US university (MA International Studies and MSc Business Administration) and prospecting grad programs for admissions in August of 2021. As I gathered information about the respectability of social science degrees and universities in Europe the dual degree program launching in 2020 from LSE and SciencesPo stood out to me. It includes Double Degree in the Political Economy of Development (new for 2020 entry), with a Master's degree from the Paris School of International Affairs of Sciences Po and the MSc in Development Management of LSE’s Department of International Development. I know this is a new launch but was wondering if anyone is considering applying for the Aug 2020 cycle or have any insight into the program. I aim to pursue a career working with refugees in a human rights context (in NGOs or governmental positions) and am considering a PhD for my specified interests within this field. Any input or thoughts on this program (or others you think would be suitable) would be greatly appreciated!
  13. Hello So title says it all I need different opinions to know what I should eventually improve before applying to grad school Firstly I know that you are not admission officers but I hope that you'll be able to help me/give me directions in terms what I should improve on my application I'll post relevant facts for application so you can actually see the real situation here: Ok so here we go: I'm 21 I went to International school and graduated as a valedictorian in 2017. I spent one academic year in the US where I attended prep boarding school as a scholar of the US Embassy. During that summer I attended additional classes at Yale University. I'm currently going to public University and I'm majoring in International law but I'm not very interested in my major, opportunities and everything related to this University although my GPA is 10 out of 10 I did my internship at consulting firm and currently I'm working for a lot of NGOs (both national and international) mostly because of my interest in International Relations and International Development. This summer I did my internship at the White House where I worked with the press corps and it was one of the most important opportunities for me personally. Currently I'm interning at the USAID as a media intern and running my own website on International Relations/ foreign policy. When I have time I am tutoring younger students while I'm also working part-time at International law firm as administrative assistant.
  14. Hello all, I've been admitted into and need to decide now between: 1) MSc Sociocultural Anthropology @ Oxford 2) MSc Anthropology and Development @ LSE 3) MA Anthropology @ The New School for Social Research 4) ---- waiting to hear back from MA Sociocultural Anthropology @ Columbia The teeniest bit of background possible: I'm 1-year out of Uni from a small, liberal arts college in the USA, BA summa cum laude in Anthropology with concentrations in Political Science & Arabic. My field of interest is refugee humanitarianism (specifically humanitarian/national 'imaginaries', transnational governmentality, citizenship, etc etc, especially in MENA regions). I applied to these 4 programs for their very specific departmental/collegiate exemplification of *prominent refugee studies scholars, *MENA/Islam scholars, *Arabic language courses. I'm facing two main factors: cost and prestige. The New School program is 2-years but with a large tuition stipend will end up costing approx. the same as the other 1-year programs. Have yet to hear from all funding for other two schools, but they don't give much. Apartment hunting in NYC & London sounds terrifying and extremely costly... Miriam Ticktin teaches at the New School and is very likely the most renowned refugee scholar out of all 4 departments. Looking forward I hope to either pursue a PhD or work in non-profit, policy, research related to my field. The British schools are undoubtedly much more prestigious, LSE has the draw of the Development focus of the program, which would allow me to broaden my anthropological lens. Oxford is well Oxford. A 2-year program seems appealing in that it would allow me to really challenge and deconstruct my ideas and assumptions in order to prepare me for a PhD, while the 1-year programs would require I work at least a year after in order to use them to apply for PhD. But if I end up working, the British school prestige will help. So.... how to decide the right "fit" while taking prestige into consideration, without it taking over the wheel completely? Is an expensive 1-year MA from a good name worth the cost if I end up going into a PhD? LSE vs Oxford.... prestige for American PhD programs? Thank you thank you!
  15. Trying to decide between1. LSE MSc International Political Economy (1 yr)2. Dual Degree with Sciences Po (International Economic Policy) and the University of Toronto (Global Affairs) (2yrs total)My background is in Investment Banking in Canada. Interested in moving towards a career at the OECD, World Bank, UN etc.Although LSE ranks higher than Sciences Po in most areas I'm concerned that I won't be as competitive without having an internship during my degree.Hoping for some help!Cheers
  16. I’ve been accepted to a number of masters programs, of which I’m seriously considering the following: - LSE's Msc. in Economics (2 year programme) - Duke's MS in Economics and Computation (40% tuition waiver) - Columbia's MA in Economics - NYU's MA in Economics - Tufts' MS in Economics (80% tuition waiver plus TAship) I currently work as an analyst for a government agency with a pretty heavy research component. My goal is to eventually pursue a PhD, though I’m not as competitive a candidate as I’d like to be quite yet (missing certain courses, eg real analysis, and less than stellar grades during first half of college). The plan is to use this degree as a sort of Econ post-bacc, and maybe a launching point for a better RA position (I’ve applied to a ton, but never made it past the final round). Any thoughts on where I should go? Leaning towards Duke currently.
  17. Hey y'all. Worried about my chances of acceptance into philosophy MA programs. As of right now, I know I am for sure applying to San Francisco State, California State Los Angeles, London School of Economics (MSc in Philosophy & Public Policy/Philosophy of the Social Sciences), Wayne State University (I'm already accepted into the AGRADE program there, so this is my backup), and the University of Missouri St. Louis. Possibly also applying to Georgia State University and Northern Illinois University (depending on if I can take the GRE in time). Here are my stats: GPA: 3.75 Philosophy GPA: 3.73 Treasurer of a political activist group on campus. Also involved in a volunteer group dedicated to teaching elementary students philosophy. No papers in conferences. Two letters of recommendation very familiar with my work and enthusiastic about writing the letters. One of the professors has friends in the faculty of a couple programs I'm applying to. Hoping that will help. No GRE scores. This may theoretically be a problem for University of Missouri St. Louis (recommended but not required), but for SFSU, Cal State LA, LSE, and WSU, they do not ask for GRE scores at all. Doing my writing sample on how to legally classify trans folk to ensure that insurance companies cannot deny them access to resources such as hormones, gender therapy, and surgical procedures without resorting to the medicalization of trans bodies. My interests are primarily in political philosophy, legal philosophy, ethics, and metaphysics. What do you think are my chances of acceptance? The dream would be to eventually work on a PhD at LSE or CUNY Graduate Center. I'm also very interested in the PhD programs at Michigan State, Penn State, University of Oregon, and DePaul. For schools like MSU, Penn State, and Oregon, is it really necessary for me to stress where I'm getting my masters at?
  18. Hey y'all. Worried about my chances of acceptance into philosophy MA programs. As of right now, I know I am for sure applying to San Francisco State, California State Los Angeles, London School of Economics (MSc in Philosophy & Public Policy/Philosophy of the Social Sciences), Wayne State University (I'm already accepted into the AGRADE program there, so this is my backup), and the University of Missouri St. Louis. Possibly also applying to Georgia State University and Northern Illinois University (depending on if I can take the GRE in time). Here are my stats: GPA: 3.75 Philosophy GPA: 3.73 Treasurer of a political activist group on campus. Also involved in a volunteer group dedicated to teaching elementary students philosophy. No papers in conferences. Two letters of recommendation very familiar with my work and enthusiastic about writing the letters. One of the professors has friends in the faculty of a couple programs I'm applying to. Hoping that will help. No GRE scores. This may theoretically be a problem for University of Missouri St. Louis (recommended but not required), but for SFSU, Cal State LA, LSE, and WSU, they do not ask for GRE scores at all. Doing my writing sample on how to legally classify trans folk to ensure that insurance companies cannot deny them access to resources such as hormones, gender therapy, and surgical procedures, without resorting to the medicalization of trans bodies. My interests are primarily in political philosophy, legal philosophy, ethics, and metaphysics. What do you think are my chances of acceptance? The dream would be to eventually work on a PhD at LSE or CUNY Graduate Center. I'm also very interested in the PhD programs at Michigan State, Penn State, University of Oregon, and DePaul. For schools like MSU, Penn State, and Oregon, is it really necessary for me to stress where I'm getting my masters at?
  19. Heyyyy Guys! Just got admitted to LSE MPA and SIPA'S MPA and MPA-DP. My aim is to work on international development and at global initiatives and agencies (such as UNDP, FAO, USAID,etc). None of them have offered me funding. But, from what I have heard is easier to get student loans and/or second-year funding at SIPA. But, LSE's tuiton fee is significant lowe. But I love Columbia. I am quite confused. Any advice? Anyone on the same boat. Also, I have to decide between the 2 SIPA programs.
  20. Anyone who's completed a 1 year Master's at LSE able to speak to the pros/cons of the school? I was recently accepted to the MSc in Conflict Studies and would love some input on the benefits and drawbacks of the program/school/city. Anything at all would help!
  21. Hi all, I have recently been admitted to three programs: Georgetown's MA in Conflict Resolution, Boston University's MAIA in Diplomacy, and LSE's MSc in Conflict Studies. I cannot for the life of me decide which school would be the best fit, so I'm hoping that someone here has either attended one of these schools or can offer insight into which program sounds the most compelling. Here is what I know so far: Georgetown Tuition: ~ $50k USD per year for a 2 year program Great career centre/job prospects post-grad Perfectly located for internships/careers in diplomacy or foreign service Beautiful campus Great reputation in the US Poli Sci/Government circle Very high cost of living Don't know a single person in Washington High crime rate Boston University Tuition: ~$45k USD per year for a 2 year program Offers a summer exchange program for CR students in Geneva & London Prof whose work I have followed for ages teaches a class in my department Boyfriend and best friend from uni both live here (support network + potential roommates) From what I can tell, great student-faculty outreach Very high cost of living Not as internationally acclaimed as the other 2 schools LSE Tuition: £20,904 for 1 year program (roughly $29,176 USD - this is a HUGE draw of this program, as I will be financing my own graduate degree) Great international reputation, would likely open many career doors Uni is in the centre of an exciting city Well located for careers in government/foreign service Insane cost of living From what I've gathered so far, their academics are not as strong as Georgetown Only a 1 year program, so not as much time to network/study/perform research Hands-off teaching style - very little in class time, grades based off one final exam at the end of term Any guidance you can offer on any of the 3 schools would be very much appreciated. HELP ME MAKE THIS IMPOSSIBLE DECISION!
  22. Hello, all! I am in desperate need of advice. I applied this cycle to 9 PhD programs in Public Policy and was rejected from all 9. While this is largely speculative, I believe my biggest weakness in terms of my apps was my lack of quantitative/math/econ training (qualitative BA and less than stellar GRE score of 156). Aside from that, strong undergrad GPA from UC Berkeley, senior honors thesis focused on policy, 1.5 years of research/evaluation experience in the industry, 2 years of RA work for 2 professors. I now have the opportunity to complete an MA and hopefully compensate for the quantitative gaps in my CV. I am hoping for input on which program I should pursue (in other words, which program would be most impressive to admissions committees and provide the best prep for a PhD in Public Policy/Economics). 1. LSE, Social Research Methods 2. Oxford, Evidence-Based Social Intervention and Policy Evaluation 3. NYU, Applied Quantitative Research 4. Columbia, Quantitative Methods in the Social Sciences 5. Chicago, Public Policy with Certificate in Research Methods Please help!!
  23. Admitted to one year MA in Econ at Columbia, two year MSC in Economics at LSE. What will be better in terms of job perspectives??
  24. Hi, Can I ask about my graduate school prospects? I'm technically not an econ major so I'm a little concerned. I go to a Canadian school (one okay for econ, think U of T/UBC/Queen's) I'm a Business (Honours) and Math double degree student, GPA around 3.9 total and 3.95-ish for math and econ courses. Unfortunately, I have an A- in Probability I (which is the standard Calc III-requiring Probability course) and A- in Rudin real analysis. I've gotten A+ in the introductory and intermediate micro-macro sequence. Will be taking advanced of both next semester, as well as applied econometrics (I've taken an introductory econometrics course with A+). Other math include Calc I-III (AP credits for I, II, A+ in III), Linalg (A+), Differential Equations (A+), Stochastic Processes A), Game Theory (A+, under math faculty at my school), and I will be taking Probability II next semester. A+ in business statistics which is the standard undergraduate post-Calc I/II stats course. I also have a number of finance courses all with A+s, but I'm not sure how relevant that is. I also have As and A+s in a number of operations research courses. I have regrettably two B+s in mandatory business courses ('business management' and 'marketing ii'), although these have no bearing on my economics/math focus. Internships: 1 sell-side at a big 5 Canadian bank, 1 at a major management consultancy with a decently strong economics focus. ECs: Co-chair of largest economics-oriented club on campus, writer for politics magazine, chess club. A few academic awards, mostly for high class percentile (i.e highest honors). GRE: Q 170, V 160, W 4.5 Would I have a reasonable shot at getting into an MSc economics program at LSE, for instance? I'm not aiming directly for a PhD because I would like to take more courses in economics firstly, and second because I want to continue in the working world for a little while. If I were accepted I would likely defer a year.
  25. Hello All, I applied to the MSc Statistics at LSE and was rejected in only 2.5 weeks. Is this strange? I have a 3.74 undergrad GPA (and spent my senior year abroad at the LSE). There are certainly weaknesses in my application, but for some reason, I thought it might be slightly odd that my profile would be rejected so soon... Lastly, they said they sent an email, but nothing has been received from my end. Appreciate any thoughts on this!
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