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Found 3 results

  1. Hello All! Just wanted to post a reminder that today is the first day that mentees can register for ASHA's S.T.E.P program. (You don't have to be a member of NSSLHA to join, but it's recommended) This program matches mentors to mentees in SLP or Audiology based on 6 preferences: skills that you'd like to focus on, areas of interest, areas of study, languages, work setting, and mentoring areas (career direction, bilingual service provision, careers in academia, clinical age population, conducting research, creating safe spaces and gender inclusivity, etc.). Mentors are ASHA members with their CCC's and 3 years of professional practice. The website matches you with potential mentors that match your preferences as closely as possible. From there, you are able to message the mentors that you are interested in advising you, which gives you some independence in finding a mentor that is truly going to be a good fit. Then, the mentor can decide if they would like to mentor you. In the program, you will communicate with each other regularly about your mentoring areas! The program is open to undergraduates, graduate students, and those applying to a program. They state that you should set aside approximately an hour a week for work on the program, but this opportunity is what you make of it (you get out what you put in). It's conducted via the internet, but they state that you can meet personally in certain situations (ASHA convention, etc.) Benefits (copied from the ASHA website) Access to a support system during critical stages of college and career development Insider perspective on navigating their chosen career Clear understanding and enhancement of academic and career development plans Ability to develop mentoring relationships in industries where mentoring is not readily available Enhanced understanding of the importance of mentors Exposure to diverse perspectives and experiences Direct access to power resources within the professions of audiology; speech-language pathology; and speech, language, and hearing science Identification of skill gaps before leaving school Greater knowledge of career success factors A lasting career network S.T.E.P. program info page Click here to learn more (FAQs). Click here if you're ready to register. (takes 5-10 minutes) Enrollment for this year ends February 28th. The orientation is March 3 from 8-9:30 pm ET (zoom). This post is not sponsored, I just think it's a great opportunity and hadn't seen anything posted on this forum about it.
  2. Hi gradcafe! We're the Graduate Recruitment Initiative Team (GRIT) at the University of Chicago. We're a team of graduate students committed to the recruitment and retention of students from marginalized backgrounds to graduate programs in the Biological and Physical Sciences at the University of Chicago. For students from marginalized backgrounds, the road to grad school can be confusing, downright scary, and may seem impossible. The lack of diversity in STEM is a huge problem, generating unsupportive and sometimes hostile work environments for students of color, LGBTQ+ students, students with disabilities, and female-identifying students. GRIT aims to help fix the "leaky pipeline" in graduate school recruitment by actively recruiting minority students to graduate school, connecting prospective students with faculty members of interest, and fostering personal connections with prospective students to ensure they find the best graduate program for their interests. In addition we aim to bridge gaps in marginalized student retention by providing programming that aims to provide supportive environments, community building, and increase access to mentors and role models (such as seminar series featuring LGBTQ+ scientists, womxn's networking and mentorship events, and community-focused events). So... why are we here? We want to reach out to the prospective graduate student community and offer our support! We're here to talk diversity and inclusion, talk about struggles we have faced, talk about the graduate school experience, talk about applications: ranging from "am I a competitive applicant" to how to talk about non-scientific strengths (i.e. you balanced 3 jobs in undergrad and don't have a high GPA because of it) and even what graduate and non-graduate programs to consider, to talk about our successes in recruiting, STEM identity etc. We are here to help other students have a better experience, both in the application process and after they get in. Reach out and let us know what we can do.
  3. Hello all, this is my first time on the forum. I went to an unnamed Ivy League school for undergrad and I regret it. While it had many resources and has forced me to become a better self-advocate, the intellectual environment has been boring, intellectually conservative, closed off, defensive, and selfish. It has not been a place that fosters creativity, collaboration, or kindness, nor has it offered good mentorship. It has been, in the words of one of my friends, emotionally vacuous. The physics department makes gestures towards intellectual rigor, but no one seems to have the time or energy to do pedagogy well. I want to be able to be a good mentor some day and I need to learn those skills from someone. Additionally, I do really think that better science can be done when people aren't miserable. As a result, I am looking for alternatives to the major research universities for PhD programs as I want to avoid a repeat of the above. Are there places that have a reputation similar to that of small liberal arts colleges, but for their physics PhD programs? I know that a lot of good mentorship is on a professor by professor( or lab by lab) basis, but a lot of it is also connected to the overall culture of a department. For example, I have heard some good things about the University of Washington. Alternatively, which of the major research institutions have physics departments with particularly good reputations for mentorship? I'm specifically interested in particle physics, gravitation, or optics. Thank you for any advice.
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