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Found 15 results

  1. SHSU MSFS 2018 applicant

    I'm applying for the Sam Houston State University MSFS program (fall 2018 cycle) and I would be eternally grateful for some information. Having a lot of trouble finding answers. How soon after applying did you receive an acceptance or rejection? For anyone in the program: What are your thoughts? What has been the greatest challenge? Any response is greatly appreciated!!
  2. Yo everyone - hope you're all well, So I'm looking into getting a dual MIA-MBA degree. I basically want to get involved in international business strategy - Evaluating foreign markets, expansion, best approaches, etc. And I'm thinking that a dual MIA-MBA would be perfect. Despite the massive debt, I'd be a unique candidate - the MBA would give me solid business acumen while the MIA would help me hone my language skills and solidify my theoretical knowledge of the world economy. Now I've only got a couple years of work experience, which is a little on the low side for bschool , but given the 3 year timeline I feel like I should go for it sooner than later. I've looked at a bunch of MBA programs and I've been looking at a lot of the top MIA programs (Gtown, SAIS, HKS, Princeton, SIPA, etc.). Anyway, there is some flexibility in my plan and I'm basically wondering the following: Should I apply to both MBA and MIA programs (At Colombia, Gtown, SAIS/Tuck, Texas, etc) now or, Should I apply to MIA now (less competitive admissions process), then when I'm one year in, apply to the bschool. Anyone know if this has worked for people? Would you have a better shot of getting in given that you're already enrolled at the university? I like the idea of breaking up the application process, plus even if I didn't get in to the MBA program, it would always be an option to do the two-year MIA and then a one-year MBA afterwards too. I'm also happy to hear any thoughts/insights on my plan,the MIA in general, the MBA,or the schools I mentioned. Thanks!
  3. Georgetown MSFS 2017

    Hello everyone, I wasn't able to find a specific thread for MSFS Fall 2017 cycle so I thought I would go ahead and start one! Has anyone been in contact with the admissions office? I'm hopeful that we'll hear back this week!
  4. Hi all, I've been researching Georgetown programs and although I know the emphasis for McCourt vs SFS is different I'm wondering if both are equally as good and offer as many opportunities. I am interested in a program that joins together Public Policy and International Affairs. I want to learn about both domestic and international issues and how they meet and influence each other. I'm interested in some quantitative training while also having freedom to learn about international law, human rights, diplomacy, and history. Which program do you think is best and how do they compare? I'd also appreciate any recommendations of any other programs that meet the criteria. Thanks EDIT: I'm mainly looking at the Master of International Development Policy and the Master of Science in Foreign Service (MSFS)
  5. Hi all, (Posted in the Government Affairs section with no responses, so am trying my luck here!) Hoping to get views on two offers - Georgetown Masters of Science in Foreign Service and Chicago Harris MPP. I've heard good things about both schools, and am pretty torn, so wanted to get views on which school/programme would be better for future career prospects in the US, either at a foreign policy/security-related think tank, or private sector consulting firm (either IR-focused or general e.g. McKinsey). In terms of background, I'm an international student, so would be ineligible for US government jobs. I'd be able to find work in my home country, with either of the two degrees, so that's not a major factor. Not very interested in working for NGOs or the UN. However, the foreign policy poll of IR faculty also voted Georgetown #1 (50% of all polled) for masters' degrees leading to a policy career in IR, compared to Chicago at #12 (5% of votes).[Edit: Realised the poll compared Chicago's CIR programme, not the Harris school!] Funding-wise, Harris has offered $10k, which makes overall costs around $65k, versus Georgetown at $75k. I'm waitlisted for Georgetown funding,but those decisions will only be released on 23 Apr, after Chicago's 15 Apr deadline to accept. Other potential Pros / Cons: Harris MPP: more general degree - greater customisation and flexibility to branch out for private sector jobs? However, their MPP's strengths seem to be in more urban/social policy or city development, rather than security issues. Georgetown MSFS: better location for the D.C. network; specialised IR focus and branding would also help in getting a think-tank job? I saw around 50-60% of graduates also found work for the private sector. tl;dr - how would you rate the two schools/programs, in terms of reputation & job placement (both private sector & IR-focussed careers)? Any other factors to consider, beyond the differences in curriculum? Thanks in advance!
  6. Hi all, I feel really lucky to be deciding between two offers - Georgetown Masters of Science in Foreign Service (waitlisted for funding) and Chicago Harris MPP (10k funding). I've heard good things about both schools, and am pretty torn, so wanted to get views on which school/programme would be better for future career prospects, either at a foreign policy/security-related think tank, or private sector consulting firm (either IR-focused or general e.g. McKinsey). In terms of background, I'm an international student, so would be ineligible for US government jobs. I'm confident of being able to find work in my home country, with either of the two degrees. Not very interested in working for NGOs or the UN. Potential Pros / Cons: Harris MPP: more general degree - greater customisation and flexibility to branch out for private sector jobs? Availability of some funding to offset tuition costs. Georgetown MSFS: better location for the D.C. network; specialised IR focus and branding would also help in getting a think-tank job? However, still waitlisted for funding, and am also unsure whether the MSFS translates well in when seeking private sector jobs. Thanks in advance!
  7. I have been admitted into Georgetown SSP, however I did not receive any funding. The program, due to less required credits, is about 30k less than Georgetown MSFS. However 70k for tuition over two years is still difficult to swallow. For those familiar with similar programs (including SAIS, HKS, Fletcher, GWU, etc.), what are the best external funding sources available to students in their second year? I have also heard of people gaining employment with a federal agency in their first year, and taking advantage of programs that pay for your remaining year in exchange for an employment commitment. Which IR related agencies/organizations offer this program? For those of you attending school in DC, what about attending school part time (Georgetown SSP offers classes primarily at night to allow for this)? Are internships generally paid, and what are the wages like? I have minimal work experience in the security sector, and thus I am concerned that most employers will only offer unpaid internships. Thank you for any comments/recommendations. I was hoping to attend SSP, however I am unwilling to take on debt to cover both tuition and living expenses (tuition is bad enough), and am thus hoping to at least cover my COL in DC.
  8. Hey all, As we get closer to admissions decisions being released I thought it might be useful to have a thread dedicated to Georgetown's SFS and its MSFS program. I have applied for Fall 2016 admission and would love to hear from others who have applied for this cycle, as well as those who have applied in the past and those who are intending to in the future. I'm hoping this can serve as a general discussion of our decision making processes and a place to flesh out the nuances of MSFS and make informed comparisons to rival schools/programs. For me, the MSFS program is my number one choice out of the many schools I have applied to (SAIS MA, SIPA MIA, Fletcher MALD, etc). I find its practitioner oriented curriculum appealing, the faculty and resources are impressive and it seems like its reputation in the DC area, network and connections to government jobs are nearly unrivaled. My goal is to work in American foreign policy, particularly conflict resolution and arms control. For current applicants, why have you chosen to apply to MSFS, and where does it fit within the range of schools you're looking at and your career trajectory in general? What factors are you considering and which do you put the most weight on when comparing MSFS to other programs you've applied to? Which are you leaning towards right now, and why? For past applicants who were admitted, why did you choose the MSFS program - or not? What variables informed your decision? If you attended/are attending, tell me about the program and your impressions of the curriculum, networks and career services? What do you like or not like about it, and are you happy with your decision? Best wishes and good luck to everyone!
  9. Hey Guys, What a wonderful time to be alive! Yet there are many decisions to be made! I have been offered admission by three MA programs: SAIS Washington DC; Fletcher; American University; Georgetown's Security Studies program—though I will hear from them next week, I feel it is in the bag. My predicament is the following. I am a non-American student whose main areas of interest are international relations and international security. I want to devote my life to academia (preferably based at the USA) but that requires a top-notch PhD. The programs I am most interested in are incidentally the most selective: Columbia, Harvard, Princeton, Chicago and Yale. My question for Grad Café’s devoted followers is the following: Which of the MA programs I mentioned above would best prepare me for the PhDs admissions I mentioned beneath? By now, I have realized that American admission committee’s do not focus exclusively on one item on the applicant’s CV. But since I want to walk the road towards tenure, my academic credentials will carry significant weight both for my PhD admission and my career. I might be too picky, but I am troubled with the following observations: - SAIS might be considered too policy- or economics-centered. - I have the feeling that American U is sometimes held as a step beneath or not “prestigious enough”. - Does Georgetown’s Security Studies program carry the same reputation as the MSFS/Foreign Service? What do you guys think? Thank you
  10. Hello, I've applied for a Masters Degree with a focus on International Developments and was accepted to WWS, JHU (SAIS - IDev), MSFS (IDEV), SIPA and Fletcher. I've received varied funding from each school (WWS of course is completely funded). I'm trying not let funding be my only factor in my decision making process but would appreciated others opinions regarding my choices. I'm interested in the intersection between the public and private sector. WWS has the least business focused curriculum but it has a strong CORE curriculum as well as the brand name. SAIS/DC are more professionally focused and Fletcher gives me a good combination of all of the above. Any thoughts/opinions would be greatly appreciated. Thank you!
  11. Hey Guys, What a wonderful time to be alive! Yet there are many decisions to be made! I have been offered admission by three MA programs: SAIS Washington DC; Fletcher; American University; Georgetown's Security Studies program—though I will hear from them next week, I feel it is in the bag. My predicament is the following. I am a non-American student whose main areas of interest are international relations and international security. I want to devote my life to academia (preferably based at the USA) but that requires a top-notch PhD. The programs I am most interested in are incidentally the most selective: Columbia, Harvard, Princeton, Chicago and Yale. My question for Grad Café’s devoted followers is the following: Which of the MA programs I mentioned above would best prepare me for the PhDs admissions I mentioned beneath? By now, I have realized that American admission committee’s do not focus exclusively on one item on the applicant’s CV. But since I want to walk the road towards tenure, my academic credentials will carry significant weight both for my PhD admission and my career. I might be too picky, but I am troubled with the following observations: - SAIS might be considered too policy- or economics-centered. - I have the feeling that American U is sometimes held as a step beneath or not “prestigious enough”. - Does Georgetown’s Security Studies program carry the same reputation as the MSFS/Foreign Service? What do you guys think?
  12. I'm very torn between three programs I really like, so if anyone has thoughts that I wouldn't see in the marketing blurbs, please chime in. Everyone seems to have opinions on the relative "cachet" of each name, the closeness of each community, the opportunities of the metro areas, etc. I'll be concentrating on international trade policy, seeking employment in gov't or business. Regions of interest :Latin America, East/Southeast Asia. I've been admitted for the MALD, ElSIA MA, and MSFS--just booked a ticket to visit each open house and get a feel, for whatever that's worth. Here are my personal considerations: Georgetown: unbeatable brand name, amazing network in government, tiny classes! And, apparently, SFS-SSP paintball battles. HUGE debt, like six figures. GW: gave me some money, cheaper tuition anyway, larger network, mid-semester internships. larger classes, less valuable brand name (...?) Tufts: gave me more money, cross-register w/HKS and MIT (can take advantage of their networks?? or is this just for bragging rights?), close-knit. thesis, not DC/NY (does this really matter during the semester?) Thanks for any help!
  13. For those of us with this specific set of options, this would be a great place to lay out the pros and cons of these three institutions. Everyone seems to have opinions on the relative "cachet" of each name, the closeness of each community, the opportunities of the metro areas, etc., but it's safe to say they're all great schools, and I'd feel lucky to study at any of them. I'll be concentrating on international trade policy, seeking employment in gov't or business. Regions of interest : Latin America, East/Southeast Asia. I've been admitted for the MALD, ElSIA MA, and MSFS--just booked a ticket to visit each open house and get a feel, for whatever that's worth. Here are my personal considerations: Georgetown: unbeatable brand name, amazing network in government, tiny classes! And, apparently, SFS-SSP paintball battles. HUGE debt, like six figures. GW: gave me some money, cheaper tuition anyway, larger network, mid-semester internships. larger classes, less valuable brand name (...?) Tufts: gave me more money, cross-register w/HKS and MIT (can take advantage of their networks?? or is this just for bragging rights?), close-knit. thesis, not DC/NY (does this really matter during the semester?) I know that in our collective freak-out we've all been weighing the possibilities for months. Feel free to chime in with your thoughts, especially anyone who has good reason to opine. Many of us seem to be repeating what we've been told by the brochures (which, granted, could be entirely valid), so it would be GREAT to get a different perspective. Thanks y'all. And again, CONGRATU-effing-LATIONS to everyone who got into their choice(s), and good luck to the rest!
  14. SFS vs. SAIS

    Hey everyone, sorry to create another 'Vs.' thread. If you don't mind, I'd like to ask for your opinions. I trying to decide between SAIS and Georgetown SFS and I'm having a tough time! My stated goal in my personal statements is to become a Commercial Service Officer. These people work at US embassies, but are members of the Department of Commerce, not the State Department, I believe. Among the many things CSOs do, their work mostly consists of promoting and assisting American businesses in other countries. In grad school, I want to focus on East Asia. East Asia has developed countries, near-developed, and developing countries all mixed together. I want to focus my studies on three main aspects of IR, business, government and development, and integrate them together in the context of East Asia and the US. I won't go into details of my thoughts and reasoning, but this is part of why I want to become a CSO. To my disbelief, I got into SFS and SAIS. Unfortunately, I got no merit aid from either school; I'll be borrowing money in either case. Now here's where things get tricky for me. I've been in Japan for 3.5 years and speak Japanese with reasonable fluency. For that reason, I applied to SAIS and picked the Japan Studies regional concentration. After reading through their website, it looks like if I take a few extra Asia IR classes, I can get a Masters of Asia IR (which I intend to do if I choose SAIS). I guess the International Economics concentration and Asia IR coursework could prepare me for my intended career. But in case I can't become a CSO (of which there is a very high probability me thinks), I'd be in a good position to return to Japan/Asia or enter into some kind of Japan/Asian-related work I would think. For SFS, I picked the International Commerce and Business concentration. Compared to SAIS, SFS has very little variety with only 3 concentrations. SFS prides itself in being a 'practitioner-oriented' program; their classes are all about teaching skills. Very few people at SFS go on to do Ph.D's because they don't focus on research or theory. I wouldn't be able to take a lot of Japan/Asia-related courseshere; instead, I'd have a lot of more general IR and business classes. So why am I confused? Well, as many people stated on this forum, SAIS has a better Asian department and connections. But I think Georgetown's ICB program offers more practical skills rather than history and theory. SAIS is very economics heavy, but how useful is all that economics knowledge unless you want to become an economist? And as interesting as their Japan/Asia IR classes sound, how useful will they be? I'll benefit from gaining knowledge about history and issues in Japan/Asia, but what marketable skills will I have to show employers besides the fact I know a lot about Japan/Asia IR? I suppose I could switch and pick a functional concentration instead, but nothing at SAIS seems to fit my goals I think. Part of me also thinks I shouldn't fret over details; after all, SAIS is an amazing school with great connections and many, many successful alums. Another issue is location. If I choose SAIS, I will do my first year at Bologna vs. 2 years in DC with SFS. As cool as it would be to go to Bologna (I'll probably never get a chance to live in Europe again), part of me also reasons that it would be wiser to be in DC for 2 years. And of course, I'm also pondering the other issues already mentioned on this forum: program size, school prestige, school connections, actual campus vs. office building in downtown DC, debt, etc. I guess the issue comes back to my original thoughts on IR schools: by getting a Masters in IR, what skills would I gain and how useful will they be in when seeking employment? I've always seen MBAs has a better investment, not only because they command higher salaries, but also because they give people practical skills. For the same reason, I suppose I favor SFS over SAIS at the moment. I'm welcome to any input! By choosing an IR degree, I'm moving into a new field career-wise, so there is a lot I don't know. So please educate me!
  15. Georgetown MSFS decisions starts

    MSFS decisions are coming out, starting today. Looks like they've just updated their webiste. It's too bad it's over a two week timeframe though.. Good luck everyone! Fall 2012 Admissions Decisions: to be sent out March 15, 2012 - April 1, 2012 *Please note that all admissions decisions will be sent between March 15th - April 1, on a rolling basis. The timing of your notification is not reflective of your admissions decision. Applicants will be notified via email once their official decision is ready to view in Apply Yourself - the online application system. Merit scholarships will be included in your official admissions letter. Federal financial aid awards (FAFSA) will be sent separately, from the Office of Student Financial Services. http://msfs.georgetown.edu/admissions/