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Found 10 results

  1. I'm new to this site! Had to make an account due to my desperation with application responses. I applied to eight PhD programs in continental philosophy. I've heard back from two with rejections. The other six? Crickets. Even though other people on here are posting that they were rejected, accepted, or waitlisted from Vanderbilt and Emory, both of which I applied to, I've heard nothing from them. How did other people get responses and I did not? Is this normal? I'm really afraid my letters got lost in the mail considering I've moved a lot recently so I had them sent to my parents house for a more stable address. They say there's been no letters but this is just weird! I haven't gotten any emails either, except a weird email from Duquesne that was marketing the city... why would they send that if I'm not accepted? But why would they send that before an acceptance email? What is going on!!! Can anyone shed some light?
  2. Hi, guys. I am an applicant to philosophy PhD programs this cycle. I am applying to programs in both America (15) and Canada (3). However, it is not until last week did I know (at least some) Canadian programs have a different funding policy as American programs. In America, the programs usually waive the tuition and health insurance, and grant you 4,5-year funding that's barely enough to support your living, as they decide to admit you. For at least some Canadian programs, however, it seems they do not waive the tuition (though the tuition and insurance are cheap compared with America's), and the guaranteed funding doesn't suffice to pay your tuition + health insurance + all living expenses. Calgary requires applicants to attend their scholarship competition to get enough funding. And Western's website says its minimum funding add up to only 20,000 CAD? I don't think this is enough to live and pay tuition. I'm confused, guys -- Do philosophy PhD students in Canadian schools still pay a considerable portion from heir own pockets for their own study? Is there somewhere I can see the actual funding level of these programs?
  3. Hi, guys. I am an applicant to philosophy PhD programs this cycle. I am applying to programs in both America (15) and Canada (3). However, it is not until last week did I know (at least some) Canadian programs have a different funding policy as American programs. In America, the programs usually waive the tuition and health insurance, and grant you 4,5-year funding that's barely enough to support your living, as they decide to admit you. For at least some Canadian programs, however, it seems they do not waive the tuition (though the tuition and insurance are cheap compared with America's), and the guaranteed funding doesn't suffice to pay your tuition + health insurance + all living expenses. Calgary requires applicants to attend their scholarship competition to get enough funding. And Western's website says its minimum funding add up to only 20,000 CAD? I don't think this is enough to live and pay tuition. I'm confused, guys -- Do philosophy PhD students in Canadian schools still pay a considerable portion from heir own pockets for their own study? Is there somewhere I can see the actual funding level of these programs?
  4. I guess very few people have the same experience with me. I am a student in a top30+ University with a mediocre philosophy department. At the freshman year and the sophomore, I didn't do well in philosophy and only got a GPA of 3.3 roughly. My overall GPA in 3.6. That's absolutely low but I'm catching up now. (As a minority, I didn't acquire much skill to write philosophically when I was in my high school away from US) But I don't want to give up my dream and still decide to pursue a PHD in this area. What's your advice? Should I turn to UK for a master degree? Or there are other ways to go? Very glad if I could receive any help! Sincerely George.
  5. Hello everybody, I’m an active duty Marine, currently a junior in an online, for-profit, low-tier (still regionally accredited) college. I’m working towards my Bachelors in Philosophy and I would love to go on to pursue a graduate degree after the military. I’ll be graduating about six months before I leave the service. My GPA is 3.8 and I’ll have a total of 13 courses in philosophy. I’m worried about my chances of admission into any graduate program, the reason being my unusually weird background. The fact is very few veterans go for philosophy, and philosophy seems to be the kind of hard-knitted academic discipline to not have any flexibility whatsoever. I’m pursuing philosophy in the only way I know (my college is the only online affordable university which offers philosophy), but is that enough to compete against more traditional students? Assuming I keep a good gpa of 3.8/3.9, I get great GRE scores and a phenomenal writing sample, how bad is my non-academic background/low-tier online education going to affect my chances of admission? If you want any more information, I can provide it. Thank you!
  6. Was wondering whether the dissertation writing years also require tuition in UT Austin philosophy phd, so that tuition exemption through TA'ship etc. is required for a tuition reduction during those years. In other words, if you have no coursework, do you still pay tuition and thus need to teach for its reduction? Obviously you need it for the stipend, but I wonder about the tuition aspect. Thanks all.
  7. Hello, I’m an applicant from the UK who’s applying to Philosophy PhD programs in the US starting September 2020. I recently took the GRE and got a verbal score of 166 (97th percentile) and a quant score of 156 (60th percentile). There seems to be so much conflicting information about how important GRE scores are and, as an international applicant, it can all be very confusing. Do you think that my mediocre quant score will be a hindrance to getting into any (or certain top) PhD programs in the states? Other relevant background info to do with my application: I have a BA and an MPhil in Philosophy. I got my BA from a Russell Group University (top 25 or so in the UK) and my MPhil from an ancient University (top 2 in the UK). I have what I think is equivalent to a 4.0 GPA for my BA and a 3.8 GPA for my MPhil (although the conversion for the MPhil is quite difficult and a rough approximation). I’m expecting very promising letters of recommendation. Any clarificatory information and/or advice would be appreciated!
  8. Hi all, I thought this might be a helpful discussion to have. I'm planning on applying to PhD programs for commencement in 2020 and was curious what ya'll think. What are some advantages/disadvantages of doing a European/Australasian style PhD, which typically takes 3-4 years, rather than an American style PhD which typically takes 5-7 years? Here are some advantages I can think of: Less opportunity cost. If you get a PhD in 3ish years and either decide to leave academia or don't get a suitable academic job, you'll be younger and (presumably) more flexible about other options. You get to go straight into research rather than worrying about coursework. Granted, some non-US/non-Canadian places do require a bit of coursework in the first year (LSE, for example), but it seems to be mostly proseminars and things like that. Of course, going straight into research could be a disadvantage for those who feel underprepared. In my own case, I have a research-MA and an honours degree with a substantive research component, so I'm not worried about diving straight in. Relatedly, you can focus solely on the areas of philosophy that interest you. Most places don't seem to have the same sorts of distribution requirements as US universities do, e.g. there's none of this 'take 2 courses in metaphysics and epistemology, 2 courses in the history of philosophy, 1 course in logic, 1 foreign language' business. Again, this might be a disadvantage for some. Disadvantages of a 3-4 year PhD: Less time to publish, which is primarily what will get you a job. Concerns about being over-specialized or niche. I'm not sure how much of an issue this really is, but it seems as though coursework requirements might help one become a more well-rounded philosopher. The application process adds a layer of stress that isn't there in US-style applications: the research proposal and finding a supervisor. Most European and Australasian PhD programs require applicants to draft a research proposal and sometimes secure the support of a prospective adviser prior to applying. In most cases you probably can't just use a generic research proposal - you'll need to tailor it to each department's strengths. This is in addition to everything else (writing sample, LoR, SoP, etc). Of course, the GRE isn't required, so maybe it balances out. Would be great to hear what everyone thinks!
  9. Hi ? I am Contract Monster Slayer of Purgatory, yet you're all free to truncate my name however you wish, so long as I know you're referring to me. Anyway, this is my first day here on Grad Cafe in what I hope is my first and only year as an applicant. Then again, I've got quite the story, so I could be here a while. But hey, you tell me. Here it goes... STORY TIME (Read on if you want more detail/Skip if you don't) I am a former M.A. philosophy student/TA. I departed from my program without graduating for two reasons: (1) Incompatibility with the program in terms of research interests; I was essentially training myself to be a professional philosopher to the extent that I was self-directing my entire thesis. As for (2), I got caught up in some political B.S. that occurred within the department walls. Long (vague) story short, I got reprimanded for defending myself against some violations of both the student conduct code and workplace harassment policy. To paraphrase the Dept. Chair, "I brought attention to the people that said these things" during a seminar and work hours, mind you. Simply said, I didn't want any affiliation with this program anymore. In the end, I left the department with an exacerbated anxiety disorder, insomnia, and a meager 3.0 GPA. I had to leave. POST-DEPARTURE Unconvinced that my GPA defined my talent level, I immediately began a writing project intended for (non-graduate) academic conferences. Consequently, and please let me know if none of this means jack, I garnered acceptances to two regional conferences and one more invite (2+1= 3) via an unpublished blog post submitted to the public philosophy workshop at UNC-Chapel Hill intended for early career philosophers (if I remember correctly). Thus far, then, it would appear according to my CV that I've been active in some corner of academic philosophy since leaving my previous program. Though, it's worth mentioning that I'm not done yet, as I've expanded and submitted my project for review at an open access journal (fat chance at this point in my development, I know) and I plan on writing at least one more project for more conference presentations, though hopefully more as I have a few projects on my mind. ADDITIONAL (QUICK) DETAILS I have three LOR writers: Two from my most recent undergraduate institution and one from my previous graduate institution. WHAT I WANT TO KNOW Have I improved or in some way restored any chance of moving onto the Ph.D.?
  10. Hi everyone, Hoping to hear some advice about applying to MA programs with the long term goal of beginning a PhD in Philosophy. I graduated with honors from Rhode Island School of Design with a BFA in Painting and a concentration in History of Art and Visual Culture in 2014. Towards the end of my schooling, my focus had shifted away from Fine Art courses (which at RISD already had a degree of Theory focus) towards my liberal arts courses which were heavily influenced by Critical Theory. My GPA was 3.809. Since graduating I have done a lot of Philosophy reading and studying on my own and have taken courses at smaller non-profit educational organizations. I’ve been fairly active after school—through volunteer work, jobs, and independent research. I’m curious to hear what other peoples’ experiences are with Fine Art majors transitioning into Philosophy programs. I expect it isn’t entirely uncommon since so much of the Continental Tradition places emphasis on the Arts (there are figures like Manuel Delanda who have made the leap), but I also suspect that most people applying to Philosophy MAs from other fields have BAs rather than BFAs. I’m interested in studying the History of Philosophy and Philosophy of Aesthetics, and I have a growing interest in the study of Metaphysics & Epistemology broadly. I gravitate towards the Continental tradition, but try not to make a huge deal of the divide between the two traditions. Other areas of interest are Critical Theory, Social/Political Thought, and Media Theory. Seems like most people in strictly Philosophy fields for an MA are interested in schools like GSU, Brandeis, UW Milwaukee, and Tufts. Not sure how likely I would be to get into any of these programs. They also tend to be very expensive, though I imagine that the more recognizable institutions are really helpful in getting into any PhD programs and attaining paid teaching positions. EGS seems interesting, but I think it would work better for someone further along in their Academic work to meet practicing Philosophers and Theorists. That said, EGS does seem very open to working alongside the Arts or accepting people from Arts & Humanities backgrounds. If funding permitted, I’d be interested in schools like CUNY or The New School. Other thoughts: Warwick seems interesting. So does CsDs at UMinnesota or UNSW Australia. UC San Diego. Thoughts? Advice? Thanks.
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