Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'political behavior'.

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Comment Card
    • Announcements
  • The Cafe
    • City Guide
    • IHOG: International House of Grads
    • The Lobby
  • Applying to Graduate School
    • The April 15th is this week! Freak-out forum.
    • Applications
    • Questions and Answers
    • Waiting it Out
    • Decisions, Decisions
    • The Bank
  • Grad School Life
    • Meet and Greet
    • Officially Grads
    • Coursework, Advising, and Exams
    • Research
    • Teaching
    • Writing, Presenting and Publishing
    • Jobs
  • The Menu
    • Applied Sciences & Mathematics
    • Arts
    • Humanities
    • Interdisciplinary Studies
    • Life Sciences
    • Physical Sciences
    • Professional Programs
    • Social Sciences

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Pronouns


Location


Interests


Program

Found 3 results

  1. (posted to the PolySci forum a few months ago, but I think it would be valuable to get input from people in sociology PhDs...) I'm hoping to apply to Ph.D. programs in 2-3 years (taking some time off after my undergrad). Broadly I'm interested in studying social movements, voter behavior, and political culture, and while I am not opposed to quantitative methods (and do already have some background in them), I really want to attend a doctoral program that is strong in its qualitative methods training, particularly ethnographic research - interviewing, observation, etc. I'm not sure how to approach researching schools, since it feels like the topics I am interested in are more suited for a political science Ph.D., while the method training I am looking for is more robust in a sociology (or anthropology?) program. Any advice on how to go about deciding schools to apply to? I can apply to doctoral programs in both disciplines, but I'm curious whether ethnographic methods in political science is on its way out - and if I'm better off looking to sociology programs instead. Any insight is much appreciated!
  2. Hi, I'm still a few applications cycles away but am wondering which programs in the Top 15 have strengths/ distinct weaknesses in political behavior/ political psychology. I would appreciate any thoughts here, as I am still getting the layout of the academic field in this specific niche. I have a particular interest in China, but any professors working on political behavior/expression in authoritarian regimes or the constraints public opinion place on authoritarian decision-makers would be of great relevance. Fascinated by survey experiments and text mining as well. In my understanding, this niche might mostly pertain to CP and IR sub-fields? Thanks!
  3. Hi everyone. I've been looking around this forum for awhile as I've been researching Ph.D. programs in political science, and I have a few questions regarding admissions. First, let me give you some background information on myself. I attend a decently ranked regional liberal arts college in the Northeast, and I have a 3.8 GPA. I'm majoring in history (3.93 GPA) and minoring in political science (4.0 GPA). I have not taken the GREs yet. I have, however, taken a practice test without studying to see where I need the most improvement, scoring a 152 V / 153 Q. I understand these scores are not great as I am not a strong standardized test taker. After a few months of preparation, I hope to score between 157 and 160 on both sections. I have zero publication experience and minimal research experience. I've presented research at two regional conferences and recently applied to present poli sci research at a third this November. Also, I've written a 40-page thesis paper (although it was a history paper). As for work experience, I've interned for political nonprofits and legislative offices and done archival work. I've heard that work experience doesn't matter much to admissions committees, though. I plan to apply to programs with exceptionally strong political behavior programs this fall. That being said, I have a few questions. 1. I'm worried about my GRE scores. Even though I haven't taken the official test yet, I can't see my score being above 315/320. I know various admissions websites claimed to look at the application as a whole, but I'm nervous that my application will be immediately scrapped. How influential are GRE scores in the overall decision? 2. What are some strong political behavior programs? As of right now, my list of schools include Duke, Columbia, UC San Diego, OSU, UC Davis, Minnesota, Northwestern, UVA, UFL, and UC Irvine. 3. While my current undergraduate institution is a decently ranked regional liberal arts college, I'm worried that it won't be prestigious enough to get into any of the schools listed above. Is this justified? 4. Because I go to a liberal arts college, it's difficult to find open research assistant positions. Is my minimal research and publication experience a large issue? 5. Like I said, I've heard that work experience doesn't count for much when applying to Ph.D. programs. Is this assumption correct? If my GRE scores exceed my expectations, I think I could be considered a strong candidate. Regardless, I would appreciate any advice. Thanks!
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.