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Found 10 results

  1. Pros of OSU: - More faculty working on AI and RL. aka more potential advisors who want to do research I want to do. Pros of Duke: - Prestige (not more highly ranked in AI, but no one would know that) Any thoughts?
  2. I am looking to apply for English PhD programs in the New England area (or around there) which are fully funded with professors studying 19th century British literature and feminist/gender theory. However, I am worried about my chances of getting into a fully funded program because I didn't go to a prestigious undergrad or master's program. What kind of students apply to these programs? Does someone with this kind of background even stand a chance? University of Arizona BA in Creative Writing & Anthropology (Double Major) - 3.74 University of Southern Maine Stonecoast Creative Writing MFA - Pass (out of pass/fail) 4 academic paper presentations at conferences Study abroad for 6 months Work abroad (TEFL) for 6 months Master's academic work focuses on studying fairy tales and modern fantasy literature PhD prospective project to focus on the representation of women in 19th century fantastical literature Writing sample in relation is from a paper presented at the International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts and WorldCon Science Fiction Convention From what I've seen about the job market, you have to attend a prestigious university to have career prospects as a professor. I want to be a tenured professor studying and teaching and writing in this field more than anything in the world. Would just like to know whether that is a longshot.
  3. I am looking to apply for English PhD programs in the New England area (or around there) which are fully funded with professors studying 19th century British literature and feminist/gender theory. However, I am worried about my chances of getting into a fully funded program because I didn't go to a prestigious undergrad or master's program. Is there any hope for someone with this kind of background? University of Arizona BA in Creative Writing & Anthropology (Double Major) - 3.74 University of Southern Maine Stonecoast Creative Writing MFA - Pass (out of pass/fail) 4 academic paper presentations at conferences Study abroad for 6 months Work abroad (TEFL) for 6 months Master's academic work focuses on studying fairy tales and modern fantasy literature PhD prospective project to focus on the representation of women in 19th century fantastical literature Writing sample in relation is from a paper presented at the International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts and WorldCon Science Fiction Convention From what I've seen about the job market, you have to attend a prestigious university to have career prospects as a professor. I want to be a tenured professor studying and teaching and writing in this field more than anything in the world. Would just like to know whether that is a longshot.
  4. I'm just curious, do people know much about SUNY Binghamton's PhD program in art history? Looking at their faculty, I must say they seem like a PERFECT fit for my interests (19th-20th century radical politics and their intersection with art movements). However, their job placement record, which they publicly post on their website, is mediocre at best. I am quite intrigued, but I know that that the academic job market is bad and getting worse. I'm hesitant to invest so much time in a PhD program that doesn't have proven, quality outcomes for its graduates. Any advice? Have any art historians on here sacrificed prestige for a program that feels right?
  5. Is is really that much important the reputation of the university? I have been accepted to the MALS Dartmouth, Queen's MA in Political Legal Philosophy, St. Andrews MLitt in Legal and Constitutional Studies and Sherbrooke University for the Master of Laws (LLM). So far, the advices I have received are really to go with the prestigious school - Dartmouth, Queen's St. Andrews and to not keep Sherbrooke University. However, I do believe there is a value in their degree -- LLM. It is normally quite impossible to enter in that degree without a prior law degree so I have to say that despite their lower reputation, I felt it was quite attractive to have this chance to study law at the graduate level. More particularly, if I had the chance to pursue a doctorate in law, I believe this program would be my only chance to pursue legal research or teach law later on.
  6. I'm having a really difficult time deciding between two of my offers and am hoping I can hear some different opinions. I am going for my masters. School A: A smaller school and program, doesn’t have the same longstanding "reputation" that the other school has. The program itself seems really great and I feel like I will have plenty of opportunities to publish and collaborate with others while I'm there. I immediately clicked with both the supervisor and the current lab members. I'm being offered amazing funding that will allow me to live comfortably and it is close enough to my hometown that I will be able to visit my family and S/O. Overall I get an extremely good feeling about this school, my heart says YES YES YES, but I feel slightly held back by the fact that it is not a "top-tier" school, I’m worried this will impact my chances at a career in Academia? School B: Incredibly prestigious for the field and specific area I am going into. Very interesting research. Generous minimum funding but I am unsure if I will get any external scholarships (won't know until after I accept) and the supervisor cannot yet guarantee additional funding. Also the graduate students here seem pretty miserable to be honest. I expect a certain degree of angst from graduate students, I mean, graduate school is a big adjustment... but these students were all incredibly miserable... I think due to the competitiveness and high standards placed upon them. Basically, I know I want to go to school A but for some reason it is so difficult for me to shake the idea of turning down school B when it is so prestigious. Why am I so conflicted?
  7. SO...perhaps too close for comfort in regards to time, I am in a rock in a hard place and completely torn about my graduate school decision. Let me begin by saying that I have been accepted into the University of Michigan (AA) and am on the track to begin the clinical MSW program this September. At this time, I reside one hour away from U of M and after scheduling classes, I realize that U of M doesn't attempt to cater much to the "working adult" between field placement, classes, work study and group projects. Perhaps this is causing me to have some cold feet about attending. That leads to me to my first question: Does anyone have any experience with working while attending U of M's MSW program? It is not to say that I don't plan to eventually move out there but due to finances, I cannot at this time and my concern is not being as successful as I could be if I lived near campus. Also- If I'm being honest, Ann Arbor as a city has never fancied me much and I have developed a great love for Grand Rapids. This has definitely made me consider Grand Valley State University as a graduate school option but I am also hesitant to give up U of M for obvious professional reasons. Does anyone have any personal experience with Grand Valley's MSW program? Can anyone shed some insight on the importance of prestige when pursuing an MSW? One thing aside from location that intrigues me about their program at GVSU is that it is an Advanced Generalist focus as opposed to either Micro or Macro. I do appreciate and prefer gaining both a community organization and clinical background but does anyone have any insight on what is more marketable in regards to future salary or hiring? I have been diligently reviewing forums, stats, etc and it's appears to be the general consensus that U of M is perhaps one of the highest ranked MSW programs in the nation. Thus making my decision significantly more difficult. Any thoughts, advice, or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
  8. How difficult would it be to attain a job in academia with a PhD from Texas A&M in the field of history? How about outside of academia? My specialization is Vietnam War/Southeast Asian history and foreign affairs. I was just wondering if universities looking to hire would brush it off, especially if I want to look for jobs in California (where I'm from). I assume Ivy League and top California schools would look more appealing than a degree from TAMU.
  9. Hi guys. I have been admitted to two Master's programs and would appreciate any advice you may have to offer. The first is Chicago's one-year MAPH program and the second is Villanova's two-year MA in English. Chicago cannot offer any funding, however, while Villanova is offering a Tuition Fellowship (though no stipend). Part of my thinks it would be insane to turn down the opportunity to study at Chicago for a year and have access to top-ten faculty and resources, even if it means going into considerable debt for tuition/living expenses. That same part of me justifies it by pointing out that I would have a year after the MAPH to work, apply to English Ph.D. programs and defer those loans. On the other hand, it would seem fiscally much more responsible to go to Villanova. While I would need to work part time to defray living expenses, I would not be accumulating debt. I really like the faculty and structure of the program, but I don't yet know what kind of placement record the MA generates as far as Ph.D. applications go (working on that). Does anyone here have experience with the program? I would love to PM/email on the subject. Anyone else facing (or faced) a similar dilemma? There are other considerations (I know many people in Chicago and almost no one in Philadelphia, for example), but I'm mainly concerned with the prestige vs. payoff problem. Muchas gracias for any advice!
  10. Hello All, What are people's perception of the University of British Columbia? Is it a good program? Is it respected amongst sociologists? Any opinions on this program and where it falls in the top 10, 20, 30 etc? I applied there and think I have a great chance of being accepted. I just wanted to know the job prospects for after obtaining a PhD there as opposed to a top 20 school like the University of Washington or a top 10 school like UCLA.
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