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Found 4 results

  1. I am about to graduate in December and I am going to pursue a career in research. I just began applying for research assistant jobs that interest me when I got some discouraging advice. My current plan is this: 1. Be hired as a research assistant starting as soon as January. 2. Work as a research assistant for at least a year or two (Ideally work for a company that can pay for grad school). Use mornings/evenings before/after work to build on personal projects (businesses I will start, etc.) and goals. 3. Transition from work mode to school mode by doing some independent study of the most relevant types of coursework that I would need to refresh (ex: biochemistry), and prepare for GRE. 4. Apply to graduate school for PhD and attend. 5. Postdoc in Japan. 6. Career in cell biology and/or genetics research. Run my businesses. I like this plan, but I want to get advice to make the best moves possible. I did not get to give the person who gave me advice the full plan because they didn't listen to the whole thing. But their advice to me was that getting a research assistant job doesn't make as much sense as doing a postbacc, since a postbacc program may be designed in a way where continuing education is easier. They said that a postbacc would be better if I plan to go to grad school later. They also said that I might not have time in the mornings and evenings to do my own thing as a research assistant because I will be busting my butt on everyone's projects. They said some other things, but I felt like it wasn't really helping because they did not listen to most of the plan or my reasons for each thing. I will list some of my reasons for wanting to do a research assistant job, but I would really appreciate everyone who sees this correcting me where I'm wrong, answering my subsequent questions, and giving me advice that would help me succeed. These are my reasons for why I am leaning toward research assistant. I want to begin working in my field as soon as possible. If I'm going to do a postbacc program, my understanding is that the application cycle is already about to end. If I start applying for postbaccs now, and they start in the summer next year, I'm behind. I know some have rolling admission, but it's still good to be an early applicant. If I apply anyway, I need to work in the meantime. So it would make more sense to do DoorDash or something until then instead of trying to get hired in a lab. But I really want to do biology instead of going back to DoorDash. If I do a research assistant job, I may not find one right away, but at least an actual job doesn't depend on an application cycle in the same way a program does. I had already started applying right before I got the advice that it's a bad idea. I need to save money. I don't have very much in savings and I have big plans. If I work now, I can save up for future goals/plans. Some major goals include, moving out and getting my own place, money for graduate school, starting my own businesses. If I do a postbacc, that's about $30,000 that I need for admission, right? I might be getting paid during the program, but I don't know if it makes sense to have a big bill like that right after finishing college. I don't want to go straight into more school. I want to work right away to gain experience in research that I'm interested in and to make money. I want a break from school so I can work on me and my goals. Not all postbaccs have an educational component, right? But if I do one, it makes the most sense to find one that incorporates that supplemental coursework that I mentioned in the beginning, right? Based on my thoughts, can wiser people please give me advice on how I might need to tweak this plan? What are the most strategic options? If I go with my plan, am I putting myself at a disadvantage compared to doing a postbacc, or is it just simply a different path? And if my current plan is sound, can you please give advice on the job application process? And pray for me/wish me luck? Thanks for reading!
  2. I am a recent graduate from Rutgers University - New Brunswick who majored in Cognitive Science (neuroscience track) and double minored in philosophy and Korean studies. I'm looking to apply to Cognitive Psychology/Cognitive Neuroscience/Behavioral Neuroscience Ph.D. programs this upcoming cycle (I've included a list of the schools I'm looking at, as well as their programs). Overall GPA: 3.52 Major GPA: 3.76 (should I include this in my CV?) GRE: 160 V, 158 Q (still haven't taken it yet but hoping to get a 320-325 when I do). Research Experience: Will amount to about 1.5 years by December. I'm looking to volunteer at another lab simultaneously. I unfortunately don’t have any publications; due to COVID-19 the one I was slated to be included in was pushed back. My question(s): How competitive am I for these schools (I guess chance me haha)? What other mid-tier programs are there for cognitive psychology, if most on my list will be too difficult? What advice do you have for someone overwhelmed by the application process? List: Rutgers Newark - Behavioral and Neural Sciences University of Maryland - Cognitive and Neural Systems Uconn - Behavioral Neuroscience OR Perception, Action, Cognition UCI - Cognitive Science UCSD - Cognitive Science Boston University - Brain, Behavior, and Cognition NYU - Cognition and Perception I would say that my top choices as of right now are UCSD, BU, NYU, and UCI Thank you so much for your help, and I hope you're all staying safe!
  3. I am a recent graduate from Rutgers University - New Brunswick who majored in Cognitive Science (neuroscience track) and minored in philosophy. I'm looking to apply to Cognitive Psychology/Cognitive Neuroscience/Behavioral Neuroscience Ph.D. programs this upcoming cycle. My overall GPA is a 3.52 (3.76 major GPA, idk if I should include this in my CV as well). I've been doing research at a lab at my undergraduate institution for about a year now, and will hopefully continue doing so full-time until August 2020. I can probably get two LORs from my lab, and another from a past professor. I unfortunately don’t have any publications; due to COVID-19 the one I was slated to be included in was pushed back. I took an official GRE diagnostic test and scored a 318 (160 in Verbal, 158 in Quant), and I'm shooting for a 320 (160 in both sections) by August, which I believe is quite possible. I may retake the GRE in November in order to bring it up to a 325, since I would like to offset my low-tier-ish GPA. My current list of schools thus far is below. However, I do think I may switch out some of the more difficult to get into schools for some not-so-difficult ones. I don't really know how competitive UC Davis and UCI are in terms of their psych graduate programs, but I really want to get into those two schools the most. My question(s): How competitive am I for these schools (I guess chance me haha)? What other mid-tier programs are there for cognitive psychology, if most on my list will be too difficult? What advice do you have for someone overwhelmed by the application process? Rutgers Newark University of Maryland UCI UMich Boston University NYU University of Delaware UC Davis UCSD (maybe) Thank you so much for your help, and I hope you're all staying safe!
  4. Hello! I am curious to see if there are any recent graduates finding themselves in the same boat as me. I JUST finished everything I need to become an SLP (Praxis passed, last clinical rotation completed, clockhours accumulated, etc etc) and am waiting for my university to post my transcripts so that I can apply for temporary licensure in the state of California. HOWEVER, my university will not be posting my transcripts until JUNE and the California state board of licensing for SLPs warns that processing times after receiving transcripts can be around 6-8 weeks. That means that I am currently unemployable as an SLP and look to be for about the next FIVE MONTHS! I do have a great-paying job lined up for August working as a licensed SLP. But that is five months away and I have no money and no license in the meantime. Is any one else experiencing this lag time for processing? Has anyone? Does anyone have any recommendations? I am currently looking to work the next 5 months for minimum wage as a barista or look at if it is even possible to get a SLPA license in the meantime and do that work.. I don't even know if that's available to me. I'm just curious as to HOW I can avoid working a minimum wage job in the licensing interim after doing all that work to earn a high paid job. Sorry- does this sound whiny? ANYWAY, let me know if anyone is experiencing anything similar! Or if you have any advice! Thank you so much!!! Ingrid
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