Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'seminary'.

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Comment Card
    • Announcements
  • The Cafe
    • City Guide
    • IHOG: International House of Grads
    • The Lobby
  • Applying to Graduate School
    • The April 15th is this week! Freak-out forum.
    • Applications
    • Questions and Answers
    • Waiting it Out
    • Decisions, Decisions
    • The Bank
  • Grad School Life
    • Meet and Greet
    • Officially Grads
    • Coursework, Advising, and Exams
    • Research
    • Teaching
    • Writing, Presenting and Publishing
    • Jobs
  • The Menu
    • Applied Sciences & Mathematics
    • Arts
    • Humanities
    • Interdisciplinary Studies
    • Life Sciences
    • Physical Sciences
    • Professional Programs
    • Social Sciences

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Pronouns


Location


Interests


Program

Found 10 results

  1. Out of the evangelical seminaries in the US, which ones are known as the most rigorous or academic? I'm aware that often the conservatives seminaries are not considered rigorous compared to the mainline divinity schools. However, which school(s) would offer an education the nearest to the rigor of a non-evangelical seminary? Is there a spectrum you could provide of rankings? I am particularly interested in Old Testament programs on the Master's level, but general comments of academic rigor on any level (including PhD) would be helpful. I've heard that possibly Trinity Evangelical Divinity School, at one point was known to be more rigorous; possibly Wheaton? What about Southeastern Baptist Seminary or Denver? Are Fuller or Gordon-Conwell considered more rigorous, or even Dallas Theological Seminary?
  2. Good morning everyone, New member here who has been a long time lurker. I am a third-year student at a small and little known TRACS accredited Bible college who intends to enter into an MDiv program for ordained ministry (military chaplaincy) in the evangelical tradition. A caveat however, is that I fell in love with scholarship in the first year of my studies and acquired a very strong desire and drive to go into academia after ministry. Thus, at some point I will go for a ThM/STM then a PhD/ThD in Theology, Hebrew Bible or New Testament. After spending a generous amount of time reading threads on here and other places, I have garnered that institutions such as Princeton Theological Seminary, Duke Divinity School and the University of Notre Dame are considered top tier, while evangelical schools trail far behind. I started to recognize some of this in that I was left wanting in many areas from my own school. I am quite confident that an MDiv from PTS (if I were admitted) would be viewed with immense suspicion by the denomination that I intend to serve in. Accordingly, I have sought and have narrowed my choices down to two schools which I believe would give me sufficient ministerial preparation while providing an at least decent academic preparation and yet would not be a roadblock to ordination. They are Fuller Theological Seminary and Beeson Divinity School. I will be applying to both, but I would like to know, from your point of view and if possible from schools like those mentioned above, which of these two institutions has the better academic reputation? Which will actually better prepare me for the kind of study that I am seeking in the future? Are there any other institutions that I am missing? I considered Gordon-Conwell Theological Semimary and Trinity Evangelical Divinity School but I have heard that their commitment to biblical inerrancy is often seen as a hindrance. Also, if you think that I should go to an institution like PTS or YDS, I would like to hear you out on that aswell. Finances are not an issue as I will be using my GI Bill. Neither is distance since I am willing to move. I am also aware that the professor job market is absolutely horrid. Nevertheless, I want to do high level study because I am so interested in those fields and I enjoy having my beliefs challenged. Thank you for all of your time and help!
  3. I was wondering if anyone had any insight on Candler School of Theology (Emory University)? I've been accepted into the M.Div. program there with full funding, but I've also been accepted into a couple of other schools that I know are more well-known. While funding is a significant piece of the puzzle in deciding where to attend, I don't want to go someplace just because they're offering me 100% tuition, especially when I've received slightly less but comparable financial aid at a couple of other schools. I've done a bit of research on Candler, but I can't seem to find a whole lot of specific information on it. Answers to the following questions would be helpful: 1.) Is Candler a reputable school? Would a degree from Candler hold the same weight as a degree from someplace like Duke Divinity or Princeton Seminary? 2.) Would an M.Div. from Candler prepare and set me up well for Ph.D work later on down the road? 3.) Is connecting with professors and networking at Candler relatively easy or challenging? 4.) Anything about Candler that could a drawback or any red flags? Any thoughts?
  4. I'm looking for advice on M.Div. programs. I'm looking to attend a school that will prepare me to serve in a wide variety of denominations (I'm somewhere along the United Methodist-Anglican/Episcopal spectrum in theological orientation, but am pretty ecumenical), that will be intellectually stimulating and challenging, and that will prepare me for the prospect of future doctoral work. I am interested broadly in religion and society (more specifically ecclesiology, ethics, history, and sociology of religion). I've been accepted to the following M.Div. programs with solid financial aid awards: 1. Princeton Theological Seminary 2. Duke Divinity School 3. Candler School of Theology (Emory University) Any advice on which of these programs would be best based on what I'm looking for? What are the strengths and weaknesses of each at this point in time?
  5. I'm looking for advice on M.Div. programs. I'm looking to attend a school that will prepare me to serve in a wide variety of denominations (I'm somewhere along the United Methodist-Anglican/Episcopal spectrum in theological orientation, but am pretty ecumenical), that will be intellectually stimulating and challenging, and that will prepare me for the prospect of future doctoral work. I am interested broadly in religion and society (more specifically ecclesiology, ethics, history, and sociology of religion). I've been accepted to the following M.Div. programs with solid financial aid awards: 1. Princeton Theological Seminary 2. Duke Divinity School 3. Candler School of Theology (Emory University) Any advice on which of these programs would be best based on what I'm looking for? What are the strengths and weaknesses of each at this point in time?
  6. I've been accepted into PTS and Duke Divinity. I'm pretty familiar with the theological framework of each institution, and what kind of quality of life I'd expect in each city. I've also received an 80% tuition scholarship and grant from PTS and 33-25% tuition grant from Duke. The standard need-based stuff from each school. My question here is: will either school do a better job preparing (perhaps qualifying) me for eventual PhD work in theology? I'm still figuring out what I'd like to do my PhD in but it would likely would be in theology (creation, anthropology, or eschatology) or early church history. I have an interdisciplinary interest in AI and music as well. The main thing that's holding me up now is that the PTS degree won't be coming from Princeton University, whereas the Duke Divinity degree will. I'm not sure that makes difference in the long run, but that's where my head is at. Any insight would be helpful!
  7. Hello! I'm a current junior at a small private school, and from my research, it seems that it may be easier to get into some "top tier" seminaries than I anticipated. I had set the bar a little lower, but reading some other posts has made me optimistic. I'll list some of my stats, and I'd love to get an opinion on my chances. GPA: 3.478 Majors: International Affairs and Religion Minor: Greek Studies Language Proficiencies: Four semesters of Greek, primarily Hellenistic Research: I am currently in the process of developing a curriculum for short-term mission groups to use which focuses on healthy service and improved intercultural interaction. I will be teaching this curriculum to a mission team and researching the impact the curriculum makes. Extracurriculars: Missions intern for my campus ministry, student leader for service in my campus ministry, small group leader, vice president of an anti-trafficking organization, participation and awardee in Model Arab League, member of my university's service oriented honors program, former virtual intern for the U.S. Department of State, former intern for an international anti-trafficking organization, and two summer study abroad mission trips in Greece and South Africa, which both involved research and working with oppressed populations. Ministry Experience: I did a gap year with YWAM, which provided six months worth of international mission work. I also have done a summer internship working for a youth ministry. This may be too long ago, but I was also a children's ministry intern for two years during high school. I have worked in a wide range of ministry, from preschoolers to the elderly, from prison to the slums. This summer, I will be interning with a church that works on the Mexico/U.S. border and working with various issues that come along with that. Denomination: Non-denominational, but I lean pretty liberally in both my politics and theology. Schools I am considering: Duke, Emory, Harvard, Mercer, Princeton, Union, and Yale (maybe others, still in the research process) I have close relationships with many of my professors and people I am connected to in ministry, so I have no doubt I could get some fantastic letters of recommendation. My greatest strength is my experience, but I worry that my GPA is too low to be considered for many of these schools. I also haven't taken the GRE yet, so I'm not sure where I would fall there. Any tips or information would be greatly appreciated! Thanks so much!
  8. Hi all! I have been reading through the forum and have really appreciated the insight many of you have into the religious studies field and various programs. My post is a bit of a "what are my chances?" and "do you have experience with my situation?" hybrid. I am a current MA (Theological Studies) student at a local ATS-accredited seminary. I graduated with my BA in Psychology in 2011, and, after soul-searching and trying my hand in several psychology-related positions, I decided to return for a seminary degree in hopes of becoming a minister, author, and perhaps adjunct prof on the side. I am also considering the prospects of pursuing PhD studies down the road. I am now 26 credits into my MATS degree at a local, ecumenical ATS-accredited seminary and have decided to transfer for two major reasons: 1) My current seminary has a good reputation locally, but has become increasingly disintegrated. In the year I've been there, they have changed the seminary's name, revised the entirety of their curriculum, fired or lost several professors, dismissed and appointed a new dean, and are soon to change the physical location of the seminary. Many of these changes have been poorly implemented and badly communicated to the students. 2) I was serving as a volunteer ministry director for the past few years at a local independent non-denom church. Unfortunately, I experienced the two lead pastors as increasingly manipulative/abusive individuals, (garden variety pathological narcissists?), and decided to leave. After departing, I learned that a good friend (who also attended the church) was sexually molested by the aforementioned pastors. These leaders have been educated at my seminary and have mentored and taught there as well, so it has made the seminary itself a difficult place for me to be. Those things said, I still want to finish a degree and continue to pursue a ministry vocation. I find myself more at home in progressive evangelical or mainline protestant contexts and have narrowed my search for an MDiv program down to the below schools: Princeton, Vanderbilt, Emory (Candler), Wake-Forest, Union, Boston U. I am most concerned with the school accepting all (or most) of my transfer credits and hope to receive funding as well. I struggled a bit in undergrad with anxiety and depression, and ended up with a 3.4 GPA, though I had a 3.8/3.9 in my last couple semesters and a 3.7 Major GPA. When I took the GRE a few years ago, I had scores that landed me in the 88th percentile for Verbal, 61st percentile for Quantitative, and 60th percentile for Essay. My graduate GPA is 4.0. I have a publication in the works with an undergrad prof and have lots of service experience with nonprofits and churches. My questions: What are my chances of being admitted to the above schools? All of them accept transfer credit, but how likely is it that my credits will be accepted? Does anyone know the likelihood of funding for my situation? Are there any other schools you might recommend for my search? Any help you can offer would be greatly appreciated!
  9. I am currently a student at Gordon-Conwell and I have learned a ton in my semester and a half there so far. My concern is I do not hear a lot about the school. They have great professors and a great set up, but why is not talked about more? Ive been considering transferring to Duke and would like to hear your thoughts. When applying to Jobs later on, I do not want to be hindered!
  10. I am graduating with a Master of Arts degree in Theological Studies this year. I have been considering continuing my education because I would like to teach as a Professor while pursuing vocational ministry endeavors. Most Ph.D programs that I have found require a M.Div as a prerequisite. I don't mind going for my M.Div, but I would prefer not to spend an extra 2 and a half years in school and extra money on the degree if I don't have to. Are there any Christian Ph.D programs that do not require an M.Div?
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.