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The Upsides of Not Getting In


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Saving up money is definitely a big one - which I'd be able to do if I moved back in with my parents and worked for a year. Also, a year's break would be a great opportunity to work on language skills to boost my next round of applications. Receiving my first rejection from a PhD program actually put me in much better spirits about everything. Knowing that I'm not going there, and probably won't be starting a PhD anywhere else next year, has allowed me to get my head out of the clouds and to focus on my ongoing undergraduate work. I'm more committed to finishing with a bang, bringing up my grades so that I'll have better luck the next time around.

Everyone, including me, was very surprised at how little my rejection upset me. The way I see it, not getting in this year will give me an excuse to enjoy my youth a little bit before plunging head on into the soul-munching horror of a PhD program.

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Well, it means that i can have an opportunity to check out the new trend in Jewish communities- co-ops that provide a Jewish environment... I'm thinking San Francisco, anbd um, see what else this country has to offer...

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Trust me when I say I totally get the feeling of having a dream dying. I've been rejected from 3 of my 6 and am anticipating two of those last 3 will be solid rejects as well, which leaves 1 school. If I don't go this year, I have to wait at least 5 years to reapply because of my family situation. This is quite literally my Perfect Storm year, now or possibly never type of deal. However... life is long. That's not just a throw away, pat concept. I've heard of people getting their doctorate late in life. Heck, I'm 37 already. While I don't know your personal situation at all, I hope you'll reapply next year or whenever you're able. The only way a dream can die is if you choose to give up on it. There's almost always another way or opportunity to get where you want to be. I still believe this. (Let the Pollyanna comments commence!).

~ m

"The only way a dream can die is if you choose to give up on it. There's almost always another way or opportunity to get where you want to be."

I'll have more time to ponder this statement. Good stuff.

I keep having dreams of packing up our F150, books and Yorkie, and hitting the road and just going - somewhere, anywhere, whatever. Just get the heck out of here and not be chained to work and a desk. My brother's planning to do the Pacific Crest Trail this April, and it's looking better and better all the time. Not that I'd have any clue whatsoever how to endure a trek like that. :)

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I can stop making posts here at gradcafe and find some friends my own age.biggrin.gif

Hate to burst your bubble honey, but you're probably less alone here than you realize! :) Then again, I just hit the ripe old age of 30, and when I read of younger applicants I get a bit jealous of the energy that probably comes with 9 fewer years. Husband is inching closer to 37. Just in case it helps you enjoy your time around here more! Oh yes, I go to bed around 8pm at night, so that makes me at least 50, right?

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Hate to burst your bubble honey, but you're probably less alone here than you realize! smile.gif Then again, I just hit the ripe old age of 30, and when I read of younger applicants I get a bit jealous of the energy that probably comes with 9 fewer years. Husband is inching closer to 37. Just in case it helps you enjoy your time around here more! Oh yes, I go to bed around 8pm at night, so that makes me at least 50, right?

Wow! 8pm, huh? That's hardcore! biggrin.gif

In truth, I was just joking around, playing on my user name -- I actually get a lot out of the forums and am glad to have others with whom to share the journey. And while my memory and my energy are not what they were at 27 (when I got my masters), I find that my 20+ years of post-college work/life experience are an asset in areas such as generating research ideas, teaching, presenting, networking, and sniffing out OPM. I try to be happy with what I have, sometimes with more success than others...

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I might teach full time for a year, save $$, and reapply. More money means I can buy $9 bottles of wine instead of my usual $6-7 limit!

Best of luck teaching... they're laying 'em off left and right (both good teachers and bad teachers)down here! Damn budget cuts!

Anyway, best of luck!

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I'm an international student, so here goes...

1. I wont have to bear the chilly climate of Boston or the deadly heat of Texas

2. I can stay closer to my family

3. I won't have to experience a culture and lifestyle change

4. My parents can start searching for a groom for me (this is called arranged marriage in India - and that is one thing I definitely dont wanna do!)

5. I could actually get married this year instead of worrying about completing credits!

6. I can do something fun and creative, maybe in the education sector

7. I can start coaching kids on how to apply to US Universities.. hehehehe

8. I can ask my previous employer if they will take me back on the job - which paid me so well and which I left only because I didn't get to use my brains there.

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I will be able to plan my wedding!! If I get in to my program I have to suddenly throw a wedding together in four months. If not, then I can push it back a year (to the original date, actually) and actually, you know...not drive myself (as) crazy with the stress of planning it so quickly.

Also I'll finish my current MA, so really...can't complain.

For everyone who is completely freaking out about losing the dream (Hermes, I'm looking at you!): A lot of my friends in the grad program where I am were rejected the first round, either going in to the MA or the PhD. They ALL say that the year off was actually really good for them. They were able to focus on the second round of apps, of course, but more importantly, they were able to spend a year reading what they wanted and when they wanted, saving up some money, have jobs with no homework, and generally relax a bit before diving in full throttle. When they did get in to their PhD programs, they were able to really throw themselves into it and stay driven for years of study. Many of friends who went straight from BA to PhD or straight from BA to MA to PhD with no break have begun to feel really burnt out, which is a problem because it is slowing their research down and we all know that's no good. What I'm trying to say is that a year away from the Academy can be a REALLY GOOD thing for academics.

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For everyone who is completely freaking out about losing the dream (Hermes, I'm looking at you!): A lot of my friends in the grad program where I am were rejected the first round, either going in to the MA or the PhD. They ALL say that the year off was actually really good for them. They were able to focus on the second round of apps, of course, but more importantly, they were able to spend a year reading what they wanted and when they wanted, saving up some money, have jobs with no homework, and generally relax a bit before diving in full throttle. When they did get in to their PhD programs, they were able to really throw themselves into it and stay driven for years of study. Many of friends who went straight from BA to PhD or straight from BA to MA to PhD with no break have begun to feel really burnt out, which is a problem because it is slowing their research down and we all know that's no good. What I'm trying to say is that a year away from the Academy can be a REALLY GOOD thing for academics.

Sigh... but I'm not ready for a break. I already had my stint of depression and burnout, fortunately it was just after finishing my applications and thesis. I'm not as freaked out now as I was. At least I have an acceptable plan now if the other two applications come back rejected. However, I don't want to slow down my progress right now. Getting my MA's began after a long stint in the work force, and I'm not quite ready to return to that. I really want to continue with my research. This semester has been a bit of a slack semester, so I have recovered for the most part. So, I am quite refreshed and am starting to generate new research and developing some new ideas.

If I don't get get accepted anywhere this year, I will accept the one year MA at Toronto since it does not seem that difficult of a program, then reapply again for a PhD next year. Next time I will have 3 masters degrees under my belt. :lol:

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Sigh... but I'm not ready for a break. I already had my stint of depression and burnout, fortunately it was just after finishing my applications and thesis. I'm not as freaked out now as I was. At least I have an acceptable plan now if the other two applications come back rejected. However, I don't want to slow down my progress right now. Getting my MA's began after a long stint in the work force, and I'm not quite ready to return to that. I really want to continue with my research. This semester has been a bit of a slack semester, so I have recovered for the most part. So, I am quite refreshed and am starting to generate new research and developing some new ideas.

If I don't get get accepted anywhere this year, I will accept the one year MA at Toronto since it does not seem that difficult of a program, then reapply again for a PhD next year. Next time I will have 3 masters degrees under my belt. :lol:

Haha, awesome, looks like you know exactly what you're getting yourself into and how the swing of your moods works! Who knows, maybe the new MA program will has some awesome research or life experience waiting!

In any case, you and I can join the ranks of "well...might not get into the program I actually APPLIED for...but dang it, I'm in SOMEWHERE, so at least I know what's going on with my life for another few months!"

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