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Anyone else chilling on multiple wait lists? So far, these are my only leads, and although I'm happy not to be rejected, it's pretty painful. I'm just looking for some moral support and maybe some words of wisdom about anything I can do to get off the wait lists. Is it too late to be corresponding with professors to make an impression and try to get in?

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I am siting on one rejection, two waitlists, and one school that still hasn't notified me either way. From what I've heard, the best thing to do is call the school and ask if there is anything you can do to increase your chances of being accepted from the waitlist. If they will accept any addition information, they will tell you. Also, if they are your top choice, tell them so. I wouldn't email professors unless they say it would help - you don't want to look shady.

Both of my schools said that there is nothing to do but sit and wait. At this point they have already ranked everyone based on their original applications. One school told me that the chances of being accepted go up after April 15th - in other words, the people higher than you on the waitlist may have taken other offers by then, so if you are the last person still uncommitted, you might have the best chance. Clearly this won't be a problem for me since I don't have any offers to accept :-P

Honestly, I think that this is emotionally harder than the original waiting period. I have no idea how likely it is that I will be taken from either list, and I can't bring myself to ask. At least before I felt really prepared for rejection. Being on the waitlist is agonizingly hopeful.

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Being on the waitlist is agonizingly hopeful.

Ain't that the truth?!

I keep waiting for the official acceptance that will turn my one implicit into an explicit. But, that may not happen, and my only other bite so far is a wait list for SMU. If it would help, I'd sing singing stripper-grams to every adcom member, which is probably why they tell us to just sit and wait.

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Ain't that the truth?!

I keep waiting for the official acceptance that will turn my one implicit into an explicit. But, that may not happen, and my only other bite so far is a wait list for SMU. If it would help, I'd sing singing stripper-grams to every adcom member, which is probably why they tell us to just sit and wait.

I've been on a waitlist since February 5th and the wait is killing me!-- I'd hate to think all this stress will be for nothing come April 15th. I'm also waiting to hear anything from the other schools. I opted not to reply to the waitlist email yet. Closer to the deadline I'm going to inquire about status and tell them they are my top school.

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As I've noted on another thread, there's not much you can do about your position on a wait list (and, frankly, you risk annoying departments if you pester them). Last year, I was waitlisted at Cornell; I meant to contact them and have my name taken off the list, as I'd had other offers, but I never got around to it. A month later, after no effort on my part, I was accepted. And I hadn't even been told that I was near the top of the list, as some of my friends were told by other schools. I guess you could call and ask how close you are to the top, but I don't think you can *influence* your position in any way.

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I'm also waitlisted since February 3, at my current top choice. The DGS is really wonderful and attentive, and we've emailed a few times since and talked on the phone once. I'm also sort of at a loss to figure out what to do now (if anything!).

One question I have for my fellow waitlisters: are any of you going to try to go to the visiting weekends of the schools you're waitlisted at? Of course it would be on my own dime, but I think it would just be so incredibly valuable to go in the event that I do eventually get an offer. The DGS told that it would be fine to do, and I'm planning to, but I just started doubting it - would it look pushy? I really wouldn't be going to influence their decision one way or another - I doubt that would work. I just genuinely want to hear what they have to say, meet the potential cohort and some of the faculty, see a class or two, etc. I think I'd really regret not going if I did end up getting in, but I'm worried about the awkward factor. Thoughts?

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I don't know about accepted student days, but I am definitely meeting with a professor at my top choice (which has wait listed me) in a couple of weeks. I am going to the city anyway, so I thought it would be a good way to get a better feel for the department and get my name in their heads in case I have to apply next year. My current professors told me that this is a wonderful idea and that it can only help my chances, although I'm not so sure. At this point, I feel I have very little to lose. I say go for it.

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i'm wait listed all over the place. barf. my stomach has been in a knot for a month.

i think i'm in good shape though...i received personalized, honest and supportive notifications from all three adcomm chairs. two of them suggested we talk on the phone. i've spoken with one (and he was very encouraging) and am slated to speak to another this weekend (and his email was very encouraging as well).

somethin's gotta giiiiive! :blink:

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As I've noted on another thread, there's not much you can do about your position on a wait list (and, frankly, you risk annoying departments if you pester them)....I don't think you can *influence* your position in any way.

I'm inclined to disagree here, respectfully. Obviously you don't want to annoy anyone, but I think it would be a good thing to show your enthusiasm. My mentors told me to email and make clear my enthusiasm for the programs where I was waitlisted--and to explain *why* I was enthusiastic to give my correspondence credibilty. I did that and then some. I originally posted more details about this here, but have removed them after giving it some thought. Suffice it to say, I feel fairly confident that my enthusiasm and gentle persistence helped me get in off one of on of my waitlists. Even if I were slated to get in anyway, I'm positive that I am being accepted off the waitlist so early (well before most of their initial admits have accepted or declined their offers) because of the efforts I made. I also made special care not to piss anyone off when showing said persistent enthusiasm.

Edited by Pamphilia

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I'm inclined to disagree here, respectfully. Obviously you don't want to annoy anyone, but I think it would be a good thing to show your enthusiasm. My mentors told me to email and make clear my enthusiasm for the programs where I was waitlisted--and to explain *why* I was enthusiastic to give my correspondence credibilty. I did that and then some; I visited both programs (not during recruitment days, but on my own). I can't say for sure but I am fairly confident that my visit is what got me into one of them. Even if I were slated to get in anyway, I'm positive that I am being accepted off the waitlist so early (well before most of their initial admits have accepted or declined their offers) because I was persistent and enthusiastic, and made serious effort to show it. I also made special effort not to piss anyone off when showing said persistent enthusiasm.

Hey, congrats on getting in off the Northwestern waitlist! That's great news.

I've been told that often, especially at programs with unranked or loosely-ranked waitlists, you can "move up" if you express serious interest/indicate that you are likely to attend (which, of course, you should not do unless it's actually true!). Going there indicates you're serious about the program, so it can't hurt in that respect.

And thanks for sharing your experience with it, pamphilia. It's good to know that a visit can help. I'm still a little unsure about the awkward factor/looking pushy at the visiting weekend, but they just offer a lot during that time that you can't get if you just visit the department on your own (which I've already done anyway, although classes were not in session). I think I'll probably end up going, but be as relaxed about it as possible while I'm there so I don't look crazy...

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It's good to know that a visit can help.

For the record, upon reflection I don't think it was the visit itself that helped, and I don't mean that all ye waitlisters should descend upon your desired programs thinking that it will get you in. (This is one of the reasons I modified my original post, but I guess the cat's out of the bag, er, again.) The visit helped *me* more than it helped the program decide on me, I think. What did help, was being able to speak to them to establish my strong interest, which I could have done over the phone.

What I think was really key here is that I had established a dialogue with the faculty at this program prior even to applying. So, I was able to draw on that dialogue when showing my enthusiasm.

Edited by Pamphilia

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For the record, upon reflection I don't think it was the visit itself that helped, and I don't mean that all ye waitlisters should descend upon your desired programs thinking that it will get you in. (This is one of the reasons I modified my original post, but I guess the cat's out of the bag, er, again.) The visit helped *me* more than it helped the program decide on me, I think. What did help, was being able to speak to them to establish my strong interest, which I could have done over the phone.

What I think was really key here is that I had established a dialogue with the faculty at this program prior even to applying. So, I was able to draw on that dialogue when showing my enthusiasm.

Yes, and I didn't mean to imply I thought that - like I said before, I wouldn't be going in order to influence their decision or to get in since I don't think that would work, but because I want to experience all those things you can't really get a sense of without doing a full visit: hear what they have to say, see classes, meet the people who might be there next fall and are there now, continue that "dialogue" you talked about. And yes, I also started that dialogue prior to applying as well. And those conversations are a big part of the reason it's my top choice.

Hopeful agony: check yes.

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(And oops, my reply inadvertently preserved the original version that you later edited, for all of internet time - sorry!)

Edited by intextrovert

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Yes, and I didn't mean to imply I thought that - like I said before, I wouldn't be going in order to influence their decision...but because I want to experience all those things you can't really get a sense of without doing a full visit

I feel you! I should have been clearer that my second post wasn't directed at you, I just thought that my first post needed clarifying.

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Anyone else chilling on multiple wait lists? So far, these are my only leads, and although I'm happy not to be rejected, it's pretty painful. I'm just looking for some moral support and maybe some words of wisdom about anything I can do to get off the wait lists. Is it too late to be corresponding with professors to make an impression and try to get in?

Sadly, I think the only thing you can really do is hope that someone declines an offer at the school you're waitlisted at-- though this year it seems like perhaps programs are just waiting it out in hopes of enough funding to open up for an additional spot? In which case, try your hardest to figure out where you are on the waitlist. In my experience, being in contact with the DGS can't really hurt, but it doesn't really help either-- I think they all understand how stressful the situation is. I was waitlisted at U of Oregon Ph.D in English Lit program last year while my partner had an offer from them. We visited the program and were treated so well by everyone there. Elizabeth Bohls, the DGS there, was especially sensitive to my quite tender psyche, and visiting made both me and my partner feel so good about the program. I was number one going into the last month of the season, but, alas, only got in once my partner declined. Liz Bohls knew all of this and while I am currently not in a program, I got let down in the nicest and most conscientious way, and that, as far as I'm concerned, was worth the trouble I took to pester.

My partner decided to take the offer from UC Davis, where, incidentally, I'm number one on the waitlist this year (I think I might actually BE the entire waitlist?), where it seems they've limited their offers. At this point I have, as they say, put all my eggs in one basket and withdrawn my other applications. I really want to go to school, but I also really, really want to live with my wife. This whole thing (constantly twisted stomach, loss of appetite, sense of doom) feels awfully familiar.

I'd think that you might comfort yourself a bit if you're waitlisted at some good schools-- the better the school, the better the chances are of the accepted having a number of other offers-- and the better you should feel about your application-- after all, the worst part of all of this is feeling like you're no good, which is probably never actually the case. If you do talk to the DGS, you should be able to get a good feel for how likely it is that you get in, but they also have to be rather non-committal per their responsibilities.

I suspect that writing all of this down has helped me feel better as opposed to you, so I apologize. Hopefully there is some useful sense of camaraderie; I offer you my very best thoughts.

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Yes, and I didn't mean to imply I thought that - like I said before, I wouldn't be going in order to influence their decision or to get in since I don't think that would work, but because I want to experience all those things you can't really get a sense of without doing a full visit: hear what they have to say, see classes, meet the people who might be there next fall and are there now, continue that "dialogue" you talked about. And yes, I also started that dialogue prior to applying as well. And those conversations are a big part of the reason it's my top choice.

Hopeful agony: check yes.

Here's a slightly different perspective that may or may not be helpful...

I went to my first choice school's graduate weekend (paid for mostly by them, thankfully..), met the very nice graduate students and faculty, heard lectures, toured the campus, went to a party...only to realize that, despite everything I'd built the school up to be and EXPECTED from other people's comments, my first choice school was just not a match FOR ME. It's a great school, and the other potential PhDs were great people, but it was like going on a date where you felt NOTHING.

However, had I not gone, I would've committed to spending 4+ years there. I don't think I'd be terribly happy not being a fit with the program AND feeling incredibly guilty that I was living someone else's dream. I think you should go to the schools you're waitlisted at or "hoping still," because you truly just never know. You may realize it's perfect for you or not for YOU at all, you may meet someone like me who felt better declining an offer early knowing that someone who really, really, really wanted it would get to take my place (and also so that I could move on...), or you might just "click" and make a connection that changes your fate.

Maybe everything happens for a reason or maybe we make our own luck. I don't know. I do believe that you have absolutely nothing but possible GAIN from trying. Good luck!

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I'm looking for some advice. Over three weeks ago I was put on a waitlist. I had an encouraging email exchange with the DGS - in which he referred to specifics in my app and told me I'm at the top of the list - but since then there's been nothing but silence. I know that that isn't unusual but I was wondering whether it wasn't too late for me to do something to help my case or at least calm my nerves. I was thinking of sending an email indicating that I was still really interested in the program. Should I do this? If so, what else can I or should I say? Should I volunteer to provide him with additional information? Should I briefly reiterate why his institution is a good fit for me? Should I ask to visit the department (something that would be useful for me but maybe also awkward)? Or should I just sit on my thumbs since putting them to use in writing an email would just be pointless exercise? Any help with this would be really appreciated.

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I'm looking for some advice. Over three weeks ago I was put on a waitlist. I had an encouraging email exchange with the DGS - in which he referred to specifics in my app and told me I'm at the top of the list - but since then there's been nothing but silence. I know that that isn't unusual but I was wondering whether it wasn't too late for me to do something to help my case or at least calm my nerves. I was thinking of sending an email indicating that I was still really interested in the program. Should I do this? If so, what else can I or should I say? Should I volunteer to provide him with additional information? Should I briefly reiterate why his institution is a good fit for me? Should I ask to visit the department (something that would be useful for me but maybe also awkward)? Or should I just sit on my thumbs since putting them to use in writing an email would just be pointless exercise? Any help with this would be really appreciated.

I'm in a similar situation. I thanked the GDS for being so forthcoming with my particular position, and in return assured her that the school was on the top of my list. If this school is indeed your top choice (or one of them), I think that's worth mentioning, but that's all I would share. He knows everything he needs to about you, and he's a busy guy. If the school is nearby, there seems no harm in checking things out in person, but do that for yourself.

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I'm in a similar situation. I thanked the GDS for being so forthcoming with my particular position, and in return assured her that the school was on the top of my list. If this school is indeed your top choice (or one of them), I think that's worth mentioning, but that's all I would share. He knows everything he needs to about you, and he's a busy guy. If the school is nearby, there seems no harm in checking things out in person, but do that for yourself.

Thanks for the response. Yesterday I bit the bullet and emailed the DGS to reiterate my serious interest in the school. I got a response an hour later telling me that, as expected, there's nothing for me to do but wait and that I will be offered a spot as soon as an acceptee declines. The email implied (or I hope it did) that there is at least one person whom the DGS thinks will not accept. I really hope someone declines, and soon! This is for Notre Dame, and if anyone out there has been accepted but doesn't intend to go please let the school know as soon as you can. And now, I will return to that bloodsport of waiting!

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i just learned i've been accepted with funding to my second choice program :)

i was very good about being in touch with faculty, both on and off the adcomm, and expressed my interest without sounding desperate or pushy. and it paid off :)

keep the hope up you guys! anything is possible between now and may!

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i just learned i've been accepted with funding to my second choice program smile.gif

i was very good about being in touch with faculty, both on and off the adcomm, and expressed my interest without sounding desperate or pushy. and it paid off smile.gif

keep the hope up you guys! anything is possible between now and may!

I finally wrote an email to the program that wait listed me in hopes that it might do something (exactly what that something is, I'm not quite sure yet rolleyes.gif ). I had a few significant accomplishments since submitting that I wanted to tell them about as well. Haven't heard back yet, but I'm hoping the correspondence will be nice if not positive (e.g. Oh, we just miraculously found you a spot).

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Hmm...I'm not quite sure how to deal with this situation. I'm waitlisted at my top choice, and I'm waitlisted at my third choice. On the other hand, I have a firm admit to my second choice -- and they require a decision by April 22nd. Of course, as we all know, being on a waitlist means I may not know anything until April 15th, plausibly even later. Right now I am doing my best to sustain frequent contact with #1, and have a good rapport going with the DGS. Should I, however, update him of this decision issue? I -really- do not want to imply I'm using it as leverage or suggest that I may opt for #2 over #1, but at the same time, I need to make a decision one way or another...

..help?

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Hmm...I'm not quite sure how to deal with this situation. I'm waitlisted at my top choice, and I'm waitlisted at my third choice. On the other hand, I have a firm admit to my second choice -- and they require a decision by April 22nd. Of course, as we all know, being on a waitlist means I may not know anything until April 15th, plausibly even later. Right now I am doing my best to sustain frequent contact with #1, and have a good rapport going with the DGS. Should I, however, update him of this decision issue? I -really- do not want to imply I'm using it as leverage or suggest that I may opt for #2 over #1, but at the same time, I need to make a decision one way or another...

..help?

I would say that yes, you should tell him about the solid offer you have. And there's nothing wrong with using it as leverage! People do it all the time, and it works. I mean, do it graciously and tactfully, but definitely tell him about the other offer. Tell him that, were you to receive an offer from his program, you would take it - that's the golden sentence, and if you can say it honestly, do! Then tell him that you do have another offer on the table, and need to let them know pretty soon. That way he knows that he has to compete for you and that it is time-sensitive, but that you're there if they want you - which is exactly the case.

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How long does it take to respond to a wait list status update email? It's been three days. I'm starting to freak out a little bit. I think there are a couple possibilities as to what's going on, but I don't think most of them are good:

1. email was lost

2. program administrator forwarded the email to someone without giving notification of receipt

3. ignoring me

Blah! :huh:

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How long does it take to respond to a wait list status update email? It's been three days. I'm starting to freak out a little bit. I think there are a couple possibilities as to what's going on, but I don't think most of them are good:

1. email was lost

2. program administrator forwarded the email to someone without giving notification of receipt

3. ignoring me

Blah! :huh:

or they're just super busy (most likely the case).

if you don't hear back after a total of 7 days ping them again (maybe call this time?)

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