Jump to content
rec0030

How did GPA affect your number of applications?

Recommended Posts

I'm ending my junior year, and I'm estimating that my GPA is about to go from a 3.7 to a 3.6. This is due to having some mental health issues (including a week in the hospital), and I'm afraid that I won't be as competitive when I start applying in the fall. I haven't taken the GRE yet, but I plan to take it this summer. I also plan to shadow in some hospitals since my interest is in swallowing. I'm also starting a research project this summer studying why CFY students aren't accepted into acute care positions, and I'm considering doing a PhD. I will at least do a master's thesis. So far, I have these schools on my list:

  1. Auburn University (where I currently attend)
  2. University of South Alabama
  3.  University of Memphis
  4.  University of Central Florida
  5.  University of Tennessee
  6.  Florida State
  7.  University of Florida. 

Is that a good number? I'm hoping that my interest in research will help me to stand out, and I know some of these schools have combined MS/PhD programs. I'm just worried that my GPA puts me at a disadvantage, even if I bring it up some in the fall. Thoughts?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't think there's any magic number. There's people on here that apply to 1 school and then there's people who apply to 15. I think you need to be aware of your financial situation (you'll easily be spending over $500 on the GRE and applications), where it is realistically possible for you to move, etc. 

I would just take some time look through ASHA edFind and finding schools that accept people around your GPA/GRE scores! :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don’t know much about the schools you’re applying for but I’ll tell you about my experience. I applied to 14 schools and got accepted into half of them. I have a 3.5 GPA and lower than 150 GREs. I will suggest the same thing, do your research on the ASHA website. Take the GREs at least 2 times (unless you get 150s or higher). I wouldn’t say apply to 14 schools, but around 8 is a good number (depends on your financial status). Take the GREs early in advance so you have the time (if you need to retake them). Magoosh is very helpful for the GREs. Your gpa seems fine to me, just make sure your GREs are good and your personal statement stands out! :) I’m sure you’ll be fine. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello! I don't think your GPA will hold you back. Like others have said, try to get your GRE scores in the 150s. One thing that I think helped my application (I have a 3.7 and a less than great quant score) was my personal statement and my letter of recommendation. For my top school, I really tried to align my personal statement to their goals and interests. Definitely discuss your area of interest in research! 

Look at it this way, I noticed that there are people who had both higher GPAs and higher GREs than me that did not get accepted to programs that I did. I am not at all trying to brag, however clearly there are plenty of schools who take into account multiple factors. A 4.0 GPA is amazing, but it is not a ticket in to grad school. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just like others have said, GPA and GRE scores are not everything. In both verbal and quantitative I had less than a 150. My overall GPA was less than a 3.5 but my CSD GPA was a 3.71. I made sure to really emphasize my experience in my personal statement, I had a few really unique experiences which I think helped me stand out. Also, make sure the people who write letters of recommendation for you know you really well so that way they can really speak to your abilities.

I applied to 5 schools, was rejected from 3 and waitlisted at 2. I ended up getting accepted off the waitlist at my first choice. I also know there was someone who got rejected from my top choice who had a verbal score 20 points higher than mine and a higher GPA, so that shows that your personal statement and recommendation letters can play an important role in your application. Continue to work hard, get to know your professors and start your personal statement and GRE studying and you'll be on the right track.

Good luck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My GPA was a 3.67 at the time I sent my applications in. GREs in the (low) 150s. I applied to 5 schools and was accepted into 3 of the 5. Waitlisted at 1 and rejected from my "reach school". I didn't have any TA or research experience and my LORs were not in CSD or SLP departments. I really think it depends on the programs you apply to. I applied to smaller programs that get less applicants (and cost less ?) because I realized that I would be more competitive that way. It was also about finances for me, so when my advisor told me to apply to no less than 12 schools, I felt extremely nervous. I didn't have a couple thousand dollars to spend on applications. In total I probably spent about $600 on just 5 applications. In the end, I think it was my strong personal statement and my LORs were people who genuinely knew me and cared about me. My advisor suggests a 3.7 GPA if you want to get into a "Top Ten University", so I don't think that will be a problem at all. Just research programs and choose the ones that will make you the most competitive. 

Good luck! I am sure you will be fine! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I’m not sure about the programs you listed but coming from NY where they (apparently) have some of the most competitive programs, I was accepted to 3 out of only 7 despite my GRE scores both below 150. My overall GPA was almost a 3.7 so I’m similar to you but did have some work & volunteer experience working with both children and geriatric but not too many experiences. So overall, GPA and GRE aren’t everything but don’t forget to check edfind. Just show your passion in your personal statement and try to get strong letters. Best of luck! 

Edited by slpgrad620

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/28/2018 at 1:33 PM, rec0030 said:

I'm ending my junior year, and I'm estimating that my GPA is about to go from a 3.7 to a 3.6. This is due to having some mental health issues (including a week in the hospital), and I'm afraid that I won't be as competitive when I start applying in the fall. I haven't taken the GRE yet, but I plan to take it this summer. I also plan to shadow in some hospitals since my interest is in swallowing. I'm also starting a research project this summer studying why CFY students aren't accepted into acute care positions, and I'm considering doing a PhD. I will at least do a master's thesis. So far, I have these schools on my list:

  1. Auburn University (where I currently attend)
  2. University of South Alabama
  3.  University of Memphis
  4.  University of Central Florida
  5.  University of Tennessee
  6.  Florida State
  7.  University of Florida. 

Is that a good number? I'm hoping that my interest in research will help me to stand out, and I know some of these schools have combined MS/PhD programs. I'm just worried that my GPA puts me at a disadvantage, even if I bring it up some in the fall. Thoughts?

I had a low undergrad GPA (outside of major) and a high post-bacc GPA and average GRE scores.  Because of this, I increased the number of applications I submitted.  Looking back I regret applying to so many schools because I received acceptances to a few and many waitlists.  I would recommend applying to your choices but also researching the ASHA site and make sure that they accept within your GPA range.  It wouldn't hurt to add one or two "back up schools" to your list as well. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I applied and was accepted to the University of Florida, FSU, and UCF. While my GPA was high, my GRE was very very low, and I know several other students who had lower GPAs but higher GREs. I think your experience and your letter of intent and letters of rec will play huge roles in your chance, so don't let a low GPA discourage you from applying (and i promise, yours really isn't low). I chose to attend FSU and there is an option to apply to the dual MS/PhD program if you are really serious about a PhD. Many of the Florida schools love research interests too, so this will hold a lot of weight in your applications. I'd consider you a strong candidate. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.