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Which looks better on a CV: 2nd MS or Incomplete PhD (ABD)?


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I'm currently enrolled in an applied math PhD program (I already have an MS in biostatistics).  With the exception of a one-unit special topics seminar, I've fulfilled all the course and qualifying exam requirements.  Now that I'm in the research phase of my program, I'm realizing more and more that research isn't my forte, nor is it something I enjoy doing.  Without the structure of coursework and preparing for exams, I've just been flailing.  If I'm being honest with myself, becoming a instructor/community college professor is what I would enjoy doing most, and TA'ing for the last three years has helped confirm that.

Let's say, hypothetically, I were to leave the program and apply for teaching/instructor positions.  What would be my best course of action?  

If I go the MS route, I stay an extra semester to write a scholarly paper (basically a short literature review of a specific topic) and apply for teaching positions.  Funding isn't an issue since I have a TA-ship.  If I just quit without a 2nd MS, I basically save myself a semester's worth of time and get to solely focus on applying for jobs.  I guess my main question is, which path do you think makes me more desirable to prospective community college hiring committees if there's any difference at all?  Below are some other pros and cons I would also take into consideration.  

2nd MS Pros:

1) Makes last three years feel less like they were a waste of time (i.e. less cognitive dissonance) and 2) adds another degree to my CV

2nd MS Cons:

1) Ignores fact that I was in a PhD program and completed all but dissertation essentially 2) has a lot of overlap with my first MS

Any help or insight you could provide would be greatly appreciated.  Btw, I hope this is the appropriate forum for posting; if not, I would greatly appreciate if you moved it accordingly.  

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