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Should I buy or rent my textbooks?


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Hey guys! 

My program starts next week and I am just curious about everyone's thoughts with textbooks. I was told by professors in undergrad that you should buy your textbooks (especially in graduate school) because you will want to reference them throughout your career. However, I didn't know if this was an "outdated" way of thinking now that the internet/Google is easily accessible. I am just wondering what everyones thoughts are on this. Are you buying your textbooks or just renting them? 

Thanks! Best of luck to everyone starting/continuing their graduate careers!

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Personally because I am on a budget I usually try and rent textbooks from Chegg. If the cheapest option is to buy from the bookstore or amazon then I will do that. I figure I can buy the textbooks later on if I want them once I graduate and have more money. That's why I keep my syllabi since it lists the textbooks on there. 

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i'll admit, as a book nerd who has always loved the idea of a huge personal library, I've been buying my books so that I can reference them, but also so I can display them pompously on bookshelves for the rest of my career. I've kept all relevant undergrad books too--I actually have referenced a couple of them since, so I guess they've been somewhat helpful. But no, it's really just so I can show them off. ?

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I am biased bc I didn't buy any books in Grad school I borrowed rented or went without.  I think it depends on your setting a textbook might be useful in a adult facility such as a SNF or inpatient but i'm in my CFY right now and literally wouldn't have time to look something up in a textbook unless I knew exactly where it was and which kid needed it.  So while it can be useful I only think super specific books would be helpful like Eliciting Sounds for articulation or Childhood Apraxia of Speech.  I think if you don't know exactly where the reference is you need it probably won't happen very often that you have time to reference a text.  That's not to say you aren't looking up EBP but I feel like textbooks generally take a long time to get to the point and in real life things are so much faster paced and the only time you will have to look at them is in your personal time.  So just depends if you see yourself taking your work reading home with you!

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12 hours ago, bibliophile222 said:

i'll admit, as a book nerd who has always loved the idea of a huge personal library, I've been buying my books so that I can reference them, but also so I can display them pompously on bookshelves for the rest of my career. I've kept all relevant undergrad books too--I actually have referenced a couple of them since, so I guess they've been somewhat helpful. But no, it's really just so I can show them off. ?

I completely understand because this exact thought has crossed my mind a million times! ?

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I just started my program this summer, and I've been renting since it's almost 50% off compared to buying the actual textbook. But this upcoming fall semester, I purchased a book since it's cheaper than renting. 

Trying really hard to save as much money as I can! 

The books I see that are worth buying are probably the anatomy/physiology books.

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10 hours ago, Jordyn_M463 said:

Thank you everyone! Textbooks are a pretty big expense so its nice to know what others have done in the past!

I'd like to add that there are a few websites  often sell books for cheaper than it would be to rent them. Some of the websites that come to mind include Amazon Marketplace, eBay, Better World Books, and Thrift Books. I've sometimes picked up books for as low as $4 when the asking price elsewhere was more than $30. It might be worthwhile as well to check with the professor to see if a specific version is required or if a different version or an older version is permissible.

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I've done it all basically, but renting has almost always been the most cost effective and cheapest option. I've kept a few novels by choice, but I still have a couple of purchased textbooks around that weren't worth selling back. I really just like sending the books back at the end of the semester so I don't end up with clutter/unwanted books that can't be sold back (loose leaf editions for example).

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30 minutes ago, Warelin said:

 

I'd like to add that there are a few websites  often sell books for cheaper than it would be to rent them. Some of the websites that come to mind include Amazon Marketplace, eBay, Better World Books, and Thrift Books. I've sometimes picked up books for as low as $4 when the asking price elsewhere was more than $30. It might be worthwhile as well to check with the professor to see if a specific version is required or if a different version or an older version is permissible.

Thank you! I haven't heard of some of those sites! I will check them out!

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