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Qualifications for History of Science & Technology


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Hi, I'm back again with another question. 

Now I'm majoring in history in undergraduate, and have not taken any courses in science. But, actually, I'm really interested in information science and technology, and its historical development and adaptation in management and business area. So, I want to know if I could apply for the Ph.D. program in the history of science and technology. I mean, the relevant courses taken are essential when applying for the programs in HST? If yes, should I take any courses during my left undergraduate period? 

I'm looking for any valuable advice!

Edited by tellme
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15 hours ago, tellme said:

Hi, I'm back again with another question. 

Now I'm majoring in history in undergraduate, and have not taken any courses in science. But, actually, I'm really interested in information science and technology, and its historical development and adaptation in management and business area. So, I want to know if I could apply for the Ph.D. program in the history of science and technology. I mean, the relevant courses taken are essential when applying for the programs in HST? If yes, should I take any courses during my left undergraduate period? 

I'm looking for any valuable advice!

You should be fine if you have limited experience in the subject as long as you demonstrate in your application materials precisely why you want to study it. Also, knowing and referencing active scholars in the your specialty is a big plus in your application materials. 

Very few universities have undergraduate programs in the history of science, and only a slightly larger pool of universities employ faculty members who teach courses in the history of science, let alone any particular facet in the history of science.

In the contingent of students entering into my program when I did, out of five of us, I was the only student with any extended 

Oh, and I should also add that some programs do require some familiarity with the sciences, but these programs tend to be more uncommon than ones that do not.

Edited by Neist
Excuse the typos, I'm somewhat medicated.
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18 hours ago, tellme said:

Hi, I'm back again with another question. 

Now I'm majoring in history in undergraduate, and have not taken any courses in science. But, actually, I'm really interested in information science and technology, and its historical development and adaptation in management and business area. So, I want to know if I could apply for the Ph.D. program in the history of science and technology. I mean, the relevant courses taken are essential when applying for the programs in HST? If yes, should I take any courses during my left undergraduate period? 

I'm looking for any valuable advice!

No, you'll be fine. Among people in my grad program, it's pretty split. My BA was in history, same as roughly two-thirds of people in the program. History of science is, as a field, much more closely related to history now than at any point in its past. Technical histories of science (for example, Heilbron's The Sun in the Church) are a dying breed. Technical work is very slowly starting to become important again, but I suspect it'll take another decade or so before it becomes close to mainstream again. 

On another note, what you seem interested in doing could fit very well with a historian of capitalism. 

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