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1 hour ago, Desperate Clinical said:

I do know of someone who interviewed in early February (not me) so there have been interviews that have taken place. Not sure if it was individual POI or panel, though.

Okay that's good to know. Thanks for the info !

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5/5 down for rejections, who wants to have a misery party? See y'all next cycle Jokes aside, I'm happy I made it as far as I did, applying to the top POIs at the top schools in Canada straight ou

Just got accepted off the waitlist for my dream school 😭. Alternate for CGS-M but hopefully good news will come soon for that. 

First acceptance ! School: Ryerson University Concentration: Clinical Psychology  Type: MA/PhD Date of acceptance: February 14 Notified by: Email from Director asking for my n

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13 hours ago, gradlady said:

Did anyone else get a rejection email from Waterloo? I saw that 3 people posted about it on the results page so I'm wondering if they sent out a mass email. I didn't get an email so I'm wondering what that means for my app. I'm really hoping for an acceptance and the waiting is killing me. 

Yes, I got a rejection from Waterloo yesterday, in the email, they also mention if I would like to be considered for the  Master of Applied Science (MASc) program in Developmental and Communication Science....

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I've got a little bit of a dilemma and I thought maybe someone here would have some insight into this:

I've been accepted into a couple clinical psychology programs which I have been wanting to do all my life. I am extremely grateful so I hope I don't come across as unappreciative but I'm feeling intense feelings of imposter syndrome. I am currently finishing a master's in another field and I'm feeling inadequate when I compare myself to other applicants. I'm afraid my writing is sub-par and that I'll embarrass myself in the program. The supervisor at my #1 choice school has a reputation of being tough and I'm afraid I will disappoint them and get yelled at or feel stupid.

I've applied to some counselling master's degrees and MSW programs and now I'm feeling slightly like I should just do these instead because I'm not good enough/won't make it through the PhD. I'm just worried about looking stupid. To top it all off, I'm a bit older... and i'm worried about having children while being in a PhD. Is this feasible in a clinical psychology PhD program? 

 

I'm aware that this is probably not the place to post these things but I'd love some insight if anyone has any.

 

Edit: my master's did not prepare me at ALL for the rigour that is clinical psychology. Not to be rude but the program I'm in now was likely a waste of time.

 

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@Desperate Clinical The best advice I think I’ve received from people with PhDs is to choose the supervisor who will be kind and flexible - don’t choose someone who’s a superstar but not easy to work with. PhDs are hard enough and you’ll graduate as a psychologist all the same, so don’t made it harder on yourself than it has to be. Ideally you can find both qualities in the same person, but if you can’t, choose someone who will support you 100% (you can tell this by talking to their grad students). I’d suggest reconsidering your #1 program if your POI there is known to be tough - particularly if that comment was made during the interview process by a grad student. I’d hesitate to select a POI who had even neutral comments because it’s hard for students to be honest about these things - I’ve been looking for over-the-top “I LOVE my supervisor!!!” comments. 6-7 years is a LONG TIME to be stuck with one boss - make sure you feel really good about them. 

As for imposter syndrome... everybody has it! This will come up over and over again throughout your program for everybody, so get used to the feeling of not knowing what you’re doing. This is a sign that you’re growing and challenging yourself - it should feel uncomfortable! 

Re: choosing another program... don’t do it because you’re scared you’re not good enough for clinical. You clearly are - you got in to two programs! They see hundreds of applications and tens of interviews a year and they know what to do look for - you’ve got it. Plus, MSW is a very different path re: research training and pay. It also has a very different emphasis than psych - SW focuses much more on systemic/structural issues, oppression, and social justice - psych focuses more on the individual. The approach to clinical practice differs as well, from what I’ve seen. Make sure you know which interests you more before choosing several years of schooling in it. 

I’m also older (28) and will be having kids at some point during my degree. Personally, I think having kids is always difficult and there’s never a perfect time - you’ll either be doing it in a regular job or doing it during a PhD, both of which have challenges. PhD has the benefit of more flexible scheduling, at least - but obviously much lower pay. During my years in the 9-5 though, lots of parents struggled with the very inflexible schedule imposed by their company. I think people just figure it out - you’ll find the time, manage your schedule. Hell, I’ve met early career profs with multiple kids and they’re managing it - that career stage seems more challenging for caring for very young children than the PhD stage to me. 

Slow down, take a breath - you’re nearing the end of an extremely stressful process and I’m sure you need some space to process your options. Be kind to yourself - you did it! Don’t let your “bully” brain take this away from you - you deserve to be here. 

Feel free to DM me if you need more support or want to talk further :) 

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3 hours ago, gillis_55 said:

@Desperate Clinical The best advice I think I’ve received from people with PhDs is to choose the supervisor who will be kind and flexible - don’t choose someone who’s a superstar but not easy to work with. PhDs are hard enough and you’ll graduate as a psychologist all the same, so don’t made it harder on yourself than it has to be. Ideally you can find both qualities in the same person, but if you can’t, choose someone who will support you 100% (you can tell this by talking to their grad students). I’d suggest reconsidering your #1 program if your POI there is known to be tough - particularly if that comment was made during the interview process by a grad student. I’d hesitate to select a POI who had even neutral comments because it’s hard for students to be honest about these things - I’ve been looking for over-the-top “I LOVE my supervisor!!!” comments. 6-7 years is a LONG TIME to be stuck with one boss - make sure you feel really good about them. 

As for imposter syndrome... everybody has it! This will come up over and over again throughout your program for everybody, so get used to the feeling of not knowing what you’re doing. This is a sign that you’re growing and challenging yourself - it should feel uncomfortable! 

Re: choosing another program... don’t do it because you’re scared you’re not good enough for clinical. You clearly are - you got in to two programs! They see hundreds of applications and tens of interviews a year and they know what to do look for - you’ve got it. Plus, MSW is a very different path re: research training and pay. It also has a very different emphasis than psych - SW focuses much more on systemic/structural issues, oppression, and social justice - psych focuses more on the individual. The approach to clinical practice differs as well, from what I’ve seen. Make sure you know which interests you more before choosing several years of schooling in it. 

I’m also older (28) and will be having kids at some point during my degree. Personally, I think having kids is always difficult and there’s never a perfect time - you’ll either be doing it in a regular job or doing it during a PhD, both of which have challenges. PhD has the benefit of more flexible scheduling, at least - but obviously much lower pay. During my years in the 9-5 though, lots of parents struggled with the very inflexible schedule imposed by their company. I think people just figure it out - you’ll find the time, manage your schedule. Hell, I’ve met early career profs with multiple kids and they’re managing it - that career stage seems more challenging for caring for very young children than the PhD stage to me. 

Slow down, take a breath - you’re nearing the end of an extremely stressful process and I’m sure you need some space to process your options. Be kind to yourself - you did it! Don’t let your “bully” brain take this away from you - you deserve to be here. 

Feel free to DM me if you need more support or want to talk further :) 

Thank you so much for your kindness! It is definitely relieving that other people feel the way that I do.

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Guys . . .  my POI messaged me asking if I got "the official offer" yet. My heart jolted out of my chest because I thought he meant for the Clinical Program. He was talking about something different though 😩 (which is still super exciting but I already knew about it). In hindsight I don't know why I jumped to that conclusion because I have yet to receive an unofficial offer, let alone an official one. 

The emotional turmoil is real. I've had no contact from schools so I am a wreck. 

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1 hour ago, siriuslypadfoot said:

Aaaaaand just called Queen's and all acceptances have been sent out. Second year with rejections across the board! 🙃

It's possible that someone could turn down the offer! Until it's verified that they actually accepted the offer (or you receive the official rejection), I wouldn't give up yet! I've had friends in the past come off the waitlist for their top choice in April.. There's still time. Remember, if someone holds multiple offers they can only go to one institution. 

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5 minutes ago, disney said:

It's possible that someone could turn down the offer! Until it's verified that they actually accepted the offer (or you receive the official rejection), I wouldn't give up yet! I've had friends in the past come off the waitlist for their top choice in April.. There's still time. Remember, if someone holds multiple offers they can only go to one institution. 

Hopefully! The secretary said she was sending out letters of regret and didn't mention anything about me being on a waitlist so I don't want to get my hopes up too much haha

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Hello everyone, 

I am the person who started this topic in the first place. Time really flies! I have been busy with my work so hasn't gotten much time to check gradcafe. I can't believe so much could happen in these few months (from Nov. to Feb.). I noticed someone are happy with their offers and interviews and some are dismayed by rejections and waitlists. I want to share some personal thoughts and inspirations. It's very important we don't define ourselves based on the rejection or acceptance letters. Life is so much more than the clinical psychology program. I want to share a post I read from CNN (https://money.cnn.com/gallery/smallbusiness/2015/05/12/best-advice-entrepreneurs/index.html?fbclid=IwAR0BmX3r0w-4DaS3XS5kdUXGrnS64iLBHlFr5WoYtvtSXiEpnmL9ZSPhd0I&sr=fbmoney0517bestadvice0830gal), see the copied and pasted info below 

"Here's an old Chinese proverb 塞翁失馬 (sai weng shi ma), which loosely translates as 'sometimes misfortune is a blessing in disguise.' It reminds me that life takes a meandering path and to take both the good and the bad in stride.

The proverb literally translates as "Mr. Sai loses his horse" (a seemingly bad thing); but then his horse brings back a fine stallion friend (a seemingly good thing); but then his son, while riding the stallion, falls off and breaks his leg (a seemingly bad thing); but then because of the injury, his son avoids being drafted to fight in the war (an ultimately good thing)."

Please don't be discouraged and moved on!

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Hi everyone, 

I have been a long time lurker on this forum and specifically this thread, since the beginning of this application cycle actually, and finally decided to cave and make a post myself as I have a burning question and would love to hear your opinions. I applied to 5 schools this time around, and I feel so lucky to say that I have received two offers! I am also waiting to hear back from what might just be my top choice school post-interview, but I am still trying to rank them at this point. (I'm not mentioning school names to retain my anonymity if possible-although my question might give one school away. Not that there would really be an issue with revealing my identity, but lurking has felt safer for some reason haha. Perhaps it's because clinical psych admissions just feel so fragile considering all we go through to get here, who knows.)

So, for my question: one of the schools that I was admitted to is a "fast track" program, which offers a PhD but no Master's, whereas the other one that I was offered admission at and the one that I am waiting to hear back from are typical in that they offer both Masters and PhD. Apparently the fast track program was recently "revamped" to solve very long time to completion problems. I was wondering if you guys had any idea about whether or not there might be a drawback of sorts to going to a program that only offers a PhD but no Masters degree. Obviously in most of Canada you need a PhD to be licensed anyways, so I'm kind of figuring the Masters might not be needed, but then on the flipside that's also very valuable research experience and publication opportunities that I could miss out on... plus "letters" that I won't have compared to potential competition for future jobs/grants etc. who do have a Masters. Maybe I'm overthinking this, but I'd love your opinions.

Anyways, thanks everyone for being so helpful and supportive during the stressful past couple months. This thread has been dangerously addicting, but everyone is so lovely, including so many people I met at interview days over the last month!!! I wish you all the best in your applications :)

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36 minutes ago, cep said:

Hi everyone, 

I have been a long time lurker on this forum and specifically this thread, since the beginning of this application cycle actually, and finally decided to cave and make a post myself as I have a burning question and would love to hear your opinions. I applied to 5 schools this time around, and I feel so lucky to say that I have received two offers! I am also waiting to hear back from what might just be my top choice school post-interview, but I am still trying to rank them at this point. (I'm not mentioning school names to retain my anonymity if possible-although my question might give one school away. Not that there would really be an issue with revealing my identity, but lurking has felt safer for some reason haha. Perhaps it's because clinical psych admissions just feel so fragile considering all we go through to get here, who knows.)

So, for my question: one of the schools that I was admitted to is a "fast track" program, which offers a PhD but no Master's, whereas the other one that I was offered admission at and the one that I am waiting to hear back from are typical in that they offer both Masters and PhD. Apparently the fast track program was recently "revamped" to solve very long time to completion problems. I was wondering if you guys had any idea about whether or not there might be a drawback of sorts to going to a program that only offers a PhD but no Masters degree. Obviously in most of Canada you need a PhD to be licensed anyways, so I'm kind of figuring the Masters might not be needed, but then on the flipside that's also very valuable research experience and publication opportunities that I could miss out on... plus "letters" that I won't have compared to potential competition for future jobs/grants etc. who do have a Masters. Maybe I'm overthinking this, but I'd love your opinions.

Anyways, thanks everyone for being so helpful and supportive during the stressful past couple months. This thread has been dangerously addicting, but everyone is so lovely, including so many people I met at interview days over the last month!!! I wish you all the best in your applications :)

PM coming your way :)

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1 hour ago, FallGO said:

Hello everyone, 

I am the person who started this topic in the first place. Time really flies! I have been busy with my work so hasn't gotten much time to check gradcafe. I can't believe so much could happen in these few months (from Nov. to Feb.). I noticed someone are happy with their offers and interviews and some are dismayed by rejections and waitlists. I want to share some personal thoughts and inspirations. It's very important we don't define ourselves based on the rejection or acceptance letters. Life is so much more than the clinical psychology program. I want to share a post I read from CNN (https://money.cnn.com/gallery/smallbusiness/2015/05/12/best-advice-entrepreneurs/index.html?fbclid=IwAR0BmX3r0w-4DaS3XS5kdUXGrnS64iLBHlFr5WoYtvtSXiEpnmL9ZSPhd0I&sr=fbmoney0517bestadvice0830gal), see the copied and pasted info below 

"Here's an old Chinese proverb 塞翁失馬 (sai weng shi ma), which loosely translates as 'sometimes misfortune is a blessing in disguise.' It reminds me that life takes a meandering path and to take both the good and the bad in stride.

The proverb literally translates as "Mr. Sai loses his horse" (a seemingly bad thing); but then his horse brings back a fine stallion friend (a seemingly good thing); but then his son, while riding the stallion, falls off and breaks his leg (a seemingly bad thing); but then because of the injury, his son avoids being drafted to fight in the war (an ultimately good thing)."

Please don't be discouraged and moved on!

Hi there, Thank you so much for your encouragement. I've never heard of the story before. It's very interesting :) All the best to you!

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1 hour ago, cep said:

Hi everyone, 

I have been a long time lurker on this forum and specifically this thread, since the beginning of this application cycle actually, and finally decided to cave and make a post myself as I have a burning question and would love to hear your opinions. I applied to 5 schools this time around, and I feel so lucky to say that I have received two offers! I am also waiting to hear back from what might just be my top choice school post-interview, but I am still trying to rank them at this point. (I'm not mentioning school names to retain my anonymity if possible-although my question might give one school away. Not that there would really be an issue with revealing my identity, but lurking has felt safer for some reason haha. Perhaps it's because clinical psych admissions just feel so fragile considering all we go through to get here, who knows.)

So, for my question: one of the schools that I was admitted to is a "fast track" program, which offers a PhD but no Master's, whereas the other one that I was offered admission at and the one that I am waiting to hear back from are typical in that they offer both Masters and PhD. Apparently the fast track program was recently "revamped" to solve very long time to completion problems. I was wondering if you guys had any idea about whether or not there might be a drawback of sorts to going to a program that only offers a PhD but no Masters degree. Obviously in most of Canada you need a PhD to be licensed anyways, so I'm kind of figuring the Masters might not be needed, but then on the flipside that's also very valuable research experience and publication opportunities that I could miss out on... plus "letters" that I won't have compared to potential competition for future jobs/grants etc. who do have a Masters. Maybe I'm overthinking this, but I'd love your opinions.

Anyways, thanks everyone for being so helpful and supportive during the stressful past couple months. This thread has been dangerously addicting, but everyone is so lovely, including so many people I met at interview days over the last month!!! I wish you all the best in your applications :)

Congrats on the acceptances! One downside of a PhD only program is that if something were to happen several years into the program and you weren’t able to finish, you would be left with nothing! Having the MA of the other programs is sort of a safety net to fall back on. 

On another note, I definitely know what school you’re talking about and know quite a bit about their program and the city! PM if you want to chat!

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On 2/23/2019 at 2:49 PM, Desperate Clinical said:

I've got a little bit of a dilemma and I thought maybe someone here would have some insight into this:

I've been accepted into a couple clinical psychology programs which I have been wanting to do all my life. I am extremely grateful so I hope I don't come across as unappreciative but I'm feeling intense feelings of imposter syndrome. I am currently finishing a master's in another field and I'm feeling inadequate when I compare myself to other applicants. I'm afraid my writing is sub-par and that I'll embarrass myself in the program. The supervisor at my #1 choice school has a reputation of being tough and I'm afraid I will disappoint them and get yelled at or feel stupid.

I've applied to some counselling master's degrees and MSW programs and now I'm feeling slightly like I should just do these instead because I'm not good enough/won't make it through the PhD. I'm just worried about looking stupid. To top it all off, I'm a bit older... and i'm worried about having children while being in a PhD. Is this feasible in a clinical psychology PhD program? 

 

I'm aware that this is probably not the place to post these things but I'd love some insight if anyone has any.

 

Edit: my master's did not prepare me at ALL for the rigour that is clinical psychology. Not to be rude but the program I'm in now was likely a waste of time.

 

Have confidence in where your training has gotten you thus far. Everybody in the program will feel similarly to how you feel regardless of their previous training (if they don't feel it now, they will feel it shortly after the program starts). I was in a similar boat as you (I started my program last year) - I'm definitely older with a course-based master's in counselling and a few years of working first in research, then as a psychotherapist. 

The POIs have gone through so many cycles of interviews and offers that they generally have a good sense of who will succeed and who won't. If you've been accepted, then clearly, they see potential in you! This is especially true if you've been accepted into multiple programs. Don't settle for a counselling degree unless you feel like clinical work is all you want to be doing with no assessments/diagnoses; that was the most limiting thing for me as a psychotherapist and the reason why I wanted to pursue more schooling even though, technically, I already had a career. You'll kick yourself later for settling later. 

Lots of people have children while they're in their training. It's a long training process and most programs are understanding of the fact that LIFE GOES ON OUTSIDE OF SCHOOL!!! In fact, I know several people in my program who not only have a child, but have multiple children under the age of 5. You make it work! 

Re POI, I'm not sure what your criteria for having chosen the POI you did as your #1, but again, it's a long program and you should prioritize fit in terms of personality as well as research. I also know people whose dissertation defences have been delayed because of interpersonal issues with their advisors. Remember, this is the person who will guide your professional and educational development for the next FIVE YEARS minimum (not including residency in PhD6). They could be the most brilliant and accomplished of them all, but if they don't give you adequate support, then it'll only be challenging for you. 

I know that was a bit long winded, but hope this helped! feel free to DM me if you want to chat further :) and congratulations!

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2 hours ago, cep said:

Hi everyone, 

I have been a long time lurker on this forum and specifically this thread, since the beginning of this application cycle actually, and finally decided to cave and make a post myself as I have a burning question and would love to hear your opinions. I applied to 5 schools this time around, and I feel so lucky to say that I have received two offers! I am also waiting to hear back from what might just be my top choice school post-interview, but I am still trying to rank them at this point. (I'm not mentioning school names to retain my anonymity if possible-although my question might give one school away. Not that there would really be an issue with revealing my identity, but lurking has felt safer for some reason haha. Perhaps it's because clinical psych admissions just feel so fragile considering all we go through to get here, who knows.)

So, for my question: one of the schools that I was admitted to is a "fast track" program, which offers a PhD but no Master's, whereas the other one that I was offered admission at and the one that I am waiting to hear back from are typical in that they offer both Masters and PhD. Apparently the fast track program was recently "revamped" to solve very long time to completion problems. I was wondering if you guys had any idea about whether or not there might be a drawback of sorts to going to a program that only offers a PhD but no Masters degree. Obviously in most of Canada you need a PhD to be licensed anyways, so I'm kind of figuring the Masters might not be needed, but then on the flipside that's also very valuable research experience and publication opportunities that I could miss out on... plus "letters" that I won't have compared to potential competition for future jobs/grants etc. who do have a Masters. Maybe I'm overthinking this, but I'd love your opinions.

Anyways, thanks everyone for being so helpful and supportive during the stressful past couple months. This thread has been dangerously addicting, but everyone is so lovely, including so many people I met at interview days over the last month!!! I wish you all the best in your applications :)

TBH, I could not imagine going directly into a PhD program. A master's program prepares you for the amount of work that you will need to put into your dissertation. A PhD proposal and defence is obviously held to a higher standard, and to go into it without having experienced what it's like would be challenging. However, if you have experience in a research-based master's where you had to go through the process, then it'll probably be okay! 

Just keep in mind that a clinical psychology program is demanding because of programs' expectations for you to do everything other masters/phd students do regarding research, but you have more coursework and practicum expectations over and above that. A masters  will prime you for all of this and ease you into it, where as jumping into a phd might be a bit of a rude awakening. 

Having said that, if the program has bee specifically tailored for you to jump right into the PhD, maybe it won't be so bad! It wouldn't be a bad idea to talk to some of the current students in that program and get their take on it. Hope this helps! 

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