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Got a call from POI at NYU. Voicemail said they have some “very exciting news” ... That means I got in, right? Right?!?! I’ll roll over and die from embarrassment if it means they referred me to their master’s program lol. 

Edited by trytostay

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7 minutes ago, trytostay said:

Got a call from POI say NYU. Voicemail said they have some “very exciting news” ... That means I got in, right? Right?!?! I’ll roll over and die from embarrassment if it means they referred me to their master’s program lol. 

Yes, that sounds promising! I don't think they would bother making POIs do marketing calls for the Masters!

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58 minutes ago, trytostay said:

Got a call from POI say NYU. Voicemail said they have some “very exciting news” ... That means I got in, right? Right?!?! I’ll roll over and die from embarrassment if it means they referred me to their master’s program lol. 

Wow this seems early for NYU! Do you mind sharing your area or who it was?

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2 hours ago, trytostay said:

Got a call from POI at NYU. Voicemail said they have some “very exciting news” ... That means I got in, right? Right?!?! I’ll roll over and die from embarrassment if it means they referred me to their master’s program lol. 

Congrats !!! Has there been any sort of change in status online? 

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4 minutes ago, theotherbrontesister said:

Congrats !!! Has there been any sort of change in status online? 

Nope!

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Offer from UIC's unfunded MA.  This is not a good look for me.

 

Edited to say to notification did come from my POI, which took a little bit of the sting out of it?

Edited by kendalldinniene

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21 minutes ago, kendalldinniene said:

Offer from UIC's unfunded MA.  This is not a good look for me.

 

Edited to say to notification did come from my POI, which took a little bit of the sting out of it?

take it this way -- people reading your application are admiring your work and seeing potential for you to grow as a scholar. although it feels like they're not because they're not accepting you into the PhD program, i would say instead that the people accepted to the PhD program just show that potential a little more. it's a very blurry line, too, because it's all subjective at a certain point :) don't lose hope!

edit: @FiguresIII man you're going to have some really hard choices to make...

Edited by mandelbulb

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@kendalldinniene  That's not a bad thing! UIC basically doesn't accept any candidates without an MA (their website says "Since 2000, we have only accepted two candidates to the PhD program who did not have a degree at the Master’s level.")-- so getting admitted there for an MA is still really good. I would definitely email all the DGS' of the schools you've gotten into, let them know you are REALLY interested, but that you have several offers and couldn't do it without funding.

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1 minute ago, urbanfarmer said:

@kendalldinniene  That's not a bad thing! UIC basically doesn't accept any candidates without an MA (their website says "Since 2000, we have only accepted two candidates to the PhD program who did not have a degree at the Master’s level.")-- so getting admitted there for an MA is still really good. I would definitely email all the DGS' of the schools you've gotten into, let them know you are REALLY interested, but that you have several offers and couldn't do it without funding.

Very true, I forgot that line was from UIC, thank you.

Also, haha, my UIC SOP was the one I had a typo in that I didn’t catch in time, I was totally expecting a flat out rejection from them 🤣

The really funny thing is I got the UIC email literally one minute after sending emails to OSU and UNL sort of telling them about each other and affirming my interest in both.  So now I feel like I should wait a couple of days before I email again?

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2 minutes ago, urbanfarmer said:

@kendalldinniene  That's not a bad thing! UIC basically doesn't accept any candidates without an MA (their website says "Since 2000, we have only accepted two candidates to the PhD program who did not have a degree at the Master’s level.")-- so getting admitted there for an MA is still really good. I would definitely email all the DGS' of the schools you've gotten into, let them know you are REALLY interested, but that you have several offers and couldn't do it without funding.

I'd caution against this unless you have a funded offer in hand. In the past, there have been applicants who have tried to play the game of matching funds. Some schools have reached out to them requesting funding letters of the other schools so that they could forward it to the right contacts to see if they could better match other offers. If you have other funded offers, I'd only would e-mail the school that you're most interested in because funding is often tied to very particular things.

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6 minutes ago, kendalldinniene said:

The really funny thing is I got the UIC email literally one minute after sending emails to OSU and UNL sort of telling them about each other and affirming my interest in both.  So now I feel like I should wait a couple of days before I email again?

can I ask what you said to them? I'm toying with the idea of emailing UNL (I have some questions about the program) but not sure what I should/can say. Feel free to pm me if you want, or I can you.

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5 minutes ago, Warelin said:

I'd caution against this unless you have a funded offer in hand. In the past, there have been applicants who have tried to play the game of matching funds. Some schools have reached out to them requesting funding letters of the other schools so that they could forward it to the right contacts to see if they could better match other offers. If you have other funded offers, I'd only would e-mail the school that you're most interested in because funding is often tied to very particular things.

Thank you for the advice. Wasn’t really thinking about matching funding (since I don’t have any atm) but rather just letting my waitlist program know I have acceptances 🤷🏼‍♀️

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2 minutes ago, kendalldinniene said:

Thank you for the advice. Wasn’t really thinking about matching funding (since I don’t have any atm) but rather just letting my waitlist program know I have acceptances 🤷🏼‍♀️

I think most programs that don't offer full funding to everyone really do want to be able to offer funding but they might not have the resources to do so. I know that private universities and public universities are subject to different laws which complicates things even more. 

When I was applying to graduate school, my professors advised me against telling other programs about my acceptances elsewhere. Doing so, they said, would showcase that you're more interested in other programs and not as heavily invested in them. Professors and staff receive so many e-mails a day (from current students, alumni, faculty, advisees, etc.) that unless you have something incredibly important to say or add, you might be ignored. Expressing your interest can be a good thing, especially, if you have some new information to add. I'd probably caution against it elsewise though.

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6 minutes ago, Warelin said:

I think most programs that don't offer full funding to everyone really do want to be able to offer funding but they might not have the resources to do so. I know that private universities and public universities are subject to different laws which complicates things even more. 

When I was applying to graduate school, my professors advised me against telling other programs about my acceptances elsewhere. Doing so, they said, would showcase that you're more interested in other programs and not as heavily invested in them. Professors and staff receive so many e-mails a day (from current students, alumni, faculty, advisees, etc.) that unless you have something incredibly important to say or add, you might be ignored. Expressing your interest can be a good thing, especially, if you have some new information to add. I'd probably caution against it elsewise though.

Well I guess we’ll see, haha, what’s done is done.

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13 minutes ago, kendalldinniene said:

Thank you for the advice. Wasn’t really thinking about matching funding (since I don’t have any atm) but rather just letting my waitlist program know I have acceptances 🤷🏼‍♀️

My last season I was accepted into Nevada's MA program, unfunded. I did contact them and let them know I was interested, however, I had to have funding. I contacted the DGS. While they did not give me full funding, they did pull some strings and come up with some funding. In the end, when I was deciding between programs, I contacted my current program and let them know I'd received a higher offer elsewhere but was interested. They gave me several thousand dollars more. So, for me, it was useful and other people I know also negotiated to get higher offers. I think it's best to just talk to your advisors about how to navigate particular programs and to talk to the DGS of where you've applied (rather than professors who have no power over funding). 

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Just now, Warelin said:

FWIW: My crystal ball says you'll wind up with a funded offer. :)

I like you and your crystal ball! I have a feeling you’re right although I’m trying not to get my hopes up.

@Sav thanks for sharing!

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53 minutes ago, Warelin said:

I'd caution against this unless you have a funded offer in hand. In the past, there have been applicants who have tried to play the game of matching funds. Some schools have reached out to them requesting funding letters of the other schools so that they could forward it to the right contacts to see if they could better match other offers. If you have other funded offers, I'd only would e-mail the school that you're most interested in because funding is often tied to very particular things.

So if I'm reading this correctly, it is common/appropriate to contact programs about funding, if you are debating between different offers? That is, school X is offering me more than school Z, but I'm more interested in school Z and should therefore try to negotiate with them (not as a money grab but more of a "I don't know if I can live on that" kind of difference)? Forgive my ignorance!

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41 minutes ago, snorkles said:

So if I'm reading this correctly, it is common/appropriate to contact programs about funding, if you are debating between different offers? That is, school X is offering me more than school Z, but I'm more interested in school Z and should therefore try to negotiate with them (not as a money grab but more of a "I don't know if I can live on that" kind of difference)? Forgive my ignorance!

I wouldn't say it is common to negotiate with programs that are fully-funded. Depending on how stipend is determined, some programs (that don't provide equal funding for everyone) might be more open to negotiating than a program that equally funds everyone. I also wouldn't try to negotiate unless it really is the only factor that is causing you to not accept the offer. If more funding is acquired, it's common courtesy to accept on the spot. It's also good to keep in mind that while programs won't rescind their offer because you're asking for more money, it might leave them with a less-than-desirable impression of who you are.

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30 minutes ago, Warelin said:

I wouldn't say it is common to negotiate with programs that are fully-funded. Depending on how stipend is determined, some programs (that don't provide equal funding for everyone) might be more open to negotiating than a program that equally funds everyone. I also wouldn't try to negotiate unless it really is the only factor that is causing you to not accept the offer. If more funding is acquired, it's common courtesy to accept on the spot. It's also good to keep in mind that while programs won't rescind their offer because you're asking for more money, it might leave them with a less-than-desirable impression of who you are.

This was my initial impression, but I read some conflicting information and wanted to clarify to make sure I wasn't missing out on an expected (but apparently not so much)  part of the process. Thanks! 

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41 minutes ago, Warelin said:

I wouldn't say it is common to negotiate with programs that are fully-funded. Depending on how stipend is determined, some programs (that don't provide equal funding for everyone) might be more open to negotiating than a program that equally funds everyone. I also wouldn't try to negotiate unless it really is the only factor that is causing you to not accept the offer. If more funding is acquired, it's common courtesy to accept on the spot. It's also good to keep in mind that while programs won't rescind their offer because you're asking for more money, it might leave them with a less-than-desirable impression of who you are.

I'd have to disagree. I negotiated a higher offer from a fully-funded program (in relation to an offer from another) and it was treated as a totally normal part of the procedure. I was also told by the DGS of the second program to email him if any programs offered me more money. Obviously you don't want to be too aggressive or pushy, but I think it's difficult to come across that way when a lot of programs expect a sort of miniature "bidding war" for students. I'd also say that there are clear upper-limits to funding; while a lot of programs will ask you to forward your highest offer to them, not many will match a stipend like Stanford's. 

TLDR: ASK FOR MORE MONEY

Edited by poliscar

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