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6 hours ago, caffeinated applicant said:

As someone sitting on two waitlists and no acceptances, I disagree with this one. Right now I'm not able to do my usual due-diligence on schools due to turmoil in my own work and personal life due to the virus sucking up every waking hour, and anyway, many schools and individual people aren't nearly as responsive as they would be otherwise in mid-March--because the virus is sucking up all their time too--so even the emails I do send don't get responses. I want the space to hold these conversations in the middle of April, instead of feeling like my time to get answers and reassure programs of my interest is going down the drain as I make sure that my family is safe and try to help others in and beyond my personal circles. Getting an acceptance on May 17th wouldn't be that different to me than getting it on April 17th, so far as the logistics of moving my entire life and my partner's life to a different state would be, but knowing that the deadline was extended would make my March less of a hellscape. 

And I know that others are in much, much worse positions! I'm like, top 10% easiest situations! I wish that the deadlines could be uniformly pushed back two weeks or a month so that professors and current students didn't have to deal with grad admissions stuff on top of their mountain of existing responsibilities due to moving classes online, childcare up in the air, professional obligations like standing on sand, etc. etc. I wish the deadlines were pushed back so that current undergrads didn't have to juggle this on top of forced evictions from their dorms. I wish, I wish... 

It would be great if all schools pushed the deadline back and gave people more time. It would certainly cause problems for some people because now you’re arriving late to the housing market and if you’re overseas you need to rush for visas, but overall it would be for the best.

But that is not happening. So if some schools decide to give more time but others don’t, how does that play out? Not all programs can actually still continue to give offers because the internal mechanisms need more processing time, so if someone rejects their spot late, it might not move to the next person. If someone is able to make a decision in May, the trickle effect could mean that many students lose spots that would have been available otherwise. Or what if school X does not budge so you accept but May 1st you get an offer off the waitlist for another school? This introduces a lot of chaos and while the flexibility is certainly great for those who hold multiple offers, if you are not those people I think this is more likely to affect you negatively than positively.

I hope this all works out for the best and everyone can make sound decisions and have enough time to make them but I am always wary when a mechanism that is meant to equalize the playing field and keep schools accountable can be nullified by particular schools. That said, I do see the point that perhaps the chaos and loss that might be effected is a lesser evil or worth it if it means reducing stress for others during this trying time. It’s hard to say, we can just hope for the best.

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That would be me. My first acceptance and I’m thrilled.

IN AT YALE!!!  IM GOING TO LOSE MY MIND I DON'T KNOW WHO I AM ANYMORE 

just got my Michigan offer. 6 years funding. Fuck. 

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6 minutes ago, WildeThing said:

It would be great if all schools pushed the deadline back and gave people more time. It would certainly cause problems for some people because now you’re arriving late to the housing market and if you’re overseas you need to rush for visas, but overall it would be for the best.

The housing market is something I've been thinking about a lot - even if the worst of this crisis has passed by, say, mid-July (and I think that's probably the best case scenario at this point), I'm horrified trying to imagine the nightmare of apartment-hunting and moving at the last minute after all this chaos - and that's assuming that things are back to "normal" enough by late summer that people are allowed to move at all.

Edited by The Hoosier Oxonian
Agitated typo
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6 hours ago, AnachronisticPoet said:

I imagine at this point that it might just be an oversight. Might be worth emailing them to ask

Thank you, I emailed the grad department a few weeks ago and he pretty much said there wasn't anything to be said since they were still making decisions, but I tried my hand with the English coordinator so lets see, lol. I wouldn't even consider my two remaining schools over the ones I was accepted to, but I honestly just need this closure at this point lol

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20 minutes ago, The Hoosier Oxonian said:

The housing market is something I've been thinking about a lot - even if the worst of this crisis has passed by, say, mid-July (and I think that's probably the best case scenario at this point), I'm horrified trying to imagine the nightmare of apartment-hunting and moving at the last minute after all this chaos - and that's assuming that things are back to "normal" enough by late summer that people are allowed to move at all.

Yes, completely understandably, which is why I want to preach for calm. This is similar to the situation many international, late-off-the-waitlist, and low-income applicants find themselves in: unable to visit, needing to gather information late and second-hand, etc. And those students usually make it work, as will most people here be able to. Things are going to take longer but faculty and students will adjust to the new normal at some point and lines of communication will flow again.

The housing situation is tough because it’s something beyond the university, but I have seen students find places to live very late. They might not be ideal, but if you have some flexibility hopefully you will be able to find something good/decent/manageable. I signed my lease May 1st and some of my cohort-mates found places later, for what it’s worth (very little, admittedly).

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1 hour ago, spikeseagulls said:

Thank you, I emailed the grad department a few weeks ago and he pretty much said there wasn't anything to be said since they were still making decisions, but I tried my hand with the English coordinator so lets see, lol. I wouldn't even consider my two remaining schools over the ones I was accepted to, but I honestly just need this closure at this point lol

So apparently I was waitlisted??!?!?! I guess they forgot to tell me...? LOL

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11 minutes ago, spikeseagulls said:

So apparently I was waitlisted??!?!?! I guess they forgot to tell me...? LOL

Wow. 

My intimidation of entering academia is starting to *slightly* decrease. Dumpster fires and hot messes. Still for it!

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Just now, gooniesneversaydie said:

Wow. 

My intimidation of entering academia is starting to *slightly* decrease. Dumpster fires and hot messes. Still for it!

Honestly! They definitely screw up all the time which lessens my imposter syndrome a bit. It's possible that they didn't contact waitlisted applicants since the only one I see on the board is mine (unless they just weren't posted on the board), but that's a pretty bad look imo. It's getting to the point of the process where people are beginning to make decisions, and I wouldn't have even thought to consider them since there's been no correspondence between us whatsoever??? 

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23 minutes ago, spikeseagulls said:

Honestly! They definitely screw up all the time which lessens my imposter syndrome a bit. It's possible that they didn't contact waitlisted applicants since the only one I see on the board is mine (unless they just weren't posted on the board), but that's a pretty bad look imo. It's getting to the point of the process where people are beginning to make decisions, and I wouldn't have even thought to consider them since there's been no correspondence between us whatsoever??? 

This is about UC Davis right? I was waitlisted by them, too, and they notified me about that via email on 2/14. Must've been a gross oversight that they didn't reach out to you.

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27 minutes ago, gooniesneversaydie said:

Wow. 

My intimidation of entering academia is starting to *slightly* decrease. Dumpster fires and hot messes. Still for it!

As someone who has been in academia for a number of years... my friend, I hate to be the one to tell you this, but our entire profession is a dumpster fire and hot mess. 
 

Love it to death regardless but... yeaaaah. 

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3 minutes ago, tinymica said:

This is about UC Davis right? I was waitlisted by them, too, and they notified me about that via email on 2/14. Must've been a gross oversight that they didn't reach out to you.

Wowwwwww. 😅I figured they forgot about me!

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I would just like to state, as someone in corporate world, it's also a dumpster fire and a hot mess. It turns out most humans (beyond, like, the Dutch or Korea and such I guess) don't actually organize that well?? Despite being capable of making the Internet. A constant marvel to behold.

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I've been accepted to 5 English MA programs so far--none are fully funded. One of them gives a stipend which nets me around +$3,000 per year.

They are good programs, but I don't know about the finances. I'm already about 40k in debt from undergrad. Is it worth pursing a 2-year MA if I need to take out graduate loans? I want to go on for a PhD and become a college professor one day. Any advice? 

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Honestly, this is misery and I regret ever complaining about my empty inbox lol. Getting over 10 emails a day now—everything from current students making themselves available for a chat, replies from DGS's, professors reaching out, admins reaching out, admins requesting additional documentation (for the THIRD TIME) for reimbursement for a nonrefundable flight for a cancelled visit (which I'm starting to think I'm unlikely to ever see, which means I'm out $400). And I spent like 2 and a half hours over the weekend on the phone with the DGS and then a POI for one of my programs. And instead of feeling more informed, it honestly just created another list of things to research and people to contact. At a time when the last thing I feel is on top of my inbox, productive, or motivated. Also, despite the deluge there are still a lot of important POIs who just ... still never responded to my email, and I feel like it would be really impolite to follow up again in the middle of a world health crisis.

This is just so much time to invest, on so many different fronts, and I constantly feel 10 steps behind. I said in a previous post I wasn't sure going through all the motions for virtual visits/phone calls (for the 4 schools that had to cancel visits) would lead to me feeling like I could make an informed decision compared to the two I got to visit ... but at this point I'm not even sure I can keep doing this for even another couple weeks, let alone til April 15th.

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Also is it just me, or do virtual visits/phone calls really just feel like disembodied voices trying to persuade you of things and giving you advice?? It's all a little too close to Chaucer's House of Fame for my liking!

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1 hour ago, Puurple said:

I've been accepted to 5 English MA programs so far--none are fully funded. One of them gives a stipend which nets me around +$3,000 per year.

They are good programs, but I don't know about the finances. I'm already about 40k in debt from undergrad. Is it worth pursing a 2-year MA if I need to take out graduate loans? I want to go on for a PhD and become a college professor one day. Any advice? 

Honestly? I would say no. A lot of people do this and a lot of people jump from paid MAs to funded PhDs (and I assume some then make the leap to paying jobs that would not have been available otherwise). But, given the academic world and job market, it does not seem like a good idea to put yourself further and further in debt. That said, this topic has been discussed here before and perhaps others have expressed the various views more eloquently than I, so I would search through this forum.

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1 hour ago, Puurple said:

I've been accepted to 5 English MA programs so far--none are fully funded. One of them gives a stipend which nets me around +$3,000 per year.

They are good programs, but I don't know about the finances. I'm already about 40k in debt from undergrad. Is it worth pursing a 2-year MA if I need to take out graduate loans? I want to go on for a PhD and become a college professor one day. Any advice? 

I'm with @WildeThing here. Do what's best for you, of course, but my thought is that an English PhD doesn't nearly so often lead to a job that will pay off those loans the way an MD or JD does. Would you be okay with paying off loans when you're 40 or 50 or even beyond? Some people are, some aren't. 

If it were me, I would study up, take whatever job I could that would give me the most time to study in off-hours (temping is often full-time and reliable hours, and I know a few people who prefer restaurant work because then they can write during the day and work at night), and apply again this fall.

I remember from a couple months back that you're interested in teaching; I had a reasonably good experience in college working for a private tutoring company--some of them are really good money. Private schools also have different requirements for teaching certification, so there might be something there--I've got a friend, for instance, who taught for two years at a private school between college and applying for PhDs, with no prior teaching experience that I'm aware of whatsoever, including no certification. I was recruited for teaching, too, from a private school placement company that advertised new teachers not needing certification. 

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Finally heard back from BU re: acquainting admits to the program (they’ll be trying to schedule online or phone chats with faculty). I’m relieved but wary about how that’ll go...

I know it’s been said but I’m just really bummed I couldn’t visit either of the schools. I feel like it’s so important and it makes me very nervous to choose “blindly.”

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2 hours ago, tinymica said:

Finally heard back from BU re: acquainting admits to the program (they’ll be trying to schedule online or phone chats with faculty). I’m relieved but wary about how that’ll go...

I know it’s been said but I’m just really bummed I couldn’t visit either of the schools. I feel like it’s so important and it makes me very nervous to choose “blindly.”

I am sorry to hear that. Perhaps revisiting your original reasons why you applied to each may help. (sad tip on what I would do If I had offers to contemplate). 

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15 minutes ago, Emailchecker said:

(sad tip on what I would do If I had offers to contemplate). 

My heart hurt reading that :( I hope you get some good news soon. Or, if you have to reapply next cycle, you get so many amazing offers your head explodes. 

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34 minutes ago, Emailchecker said:

I am sorry to hear that. Perhaps revisiting your original reasons why you applied to each may help. (sad tip on what I would do If I had offers to contemplate). 

Thank you, yes I will definitely be reflecting on what I've learned. I'm so sorry you're going through this right now; I don't mean to be insensitive to you by complaining. I hope good things come your way soon! Also, I know that this probably doesn't mean much coming from someone with offers, but being shut out doesn't mean you aren't deserving of getting into a program. It doesn't mean you aren't talented and intelligent and hard-working. And it doesn't mean that you won't be successful if you decide to try again another year. Be nice to yourself, my friend. I think you deserve some kindness.

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5 minutes ago, mobydickpic said:

is anybody else afraid that incoming cohorts will be forced to reapply, if programs are suspended/schools don't open normally in the fall ..?

I was thinking if things keep going this way, they may offer or require incoming students to defer a year. And if that happens, it will royally screw with next year's application process for sure.

Edited by Cryss
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3 minutes ago, mobydickpic said:

is anybody else afraid that incoming cohorts will be forced to reapply, if programs are suspended/schools don't open normally in the fall ..?

I definitely have concerns that schools won't be reopening normally in the fall and that this year's cohorts may have to start late or online, but it wouldn't make any practical sense for schools to just rescind this year's offers and make everyone reapply. What seems more likely if we're in a true state of economic depression and this year's cohorts end up starting late is that next year's prospective cohorts will pay the price - schools may not extend or may severely limit offers for the 2021 cycle because 2020 acceptances have ended up starting then instead.

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As a current Princeton 5th year just told me on Skype (to my horror), it's also not just whether schools will open online in the fall vs virtually and how that will affect an incoming class of graduate students ... it's also—more subtly and perhaps more importantly—the fact that given current events, we are almost undoubtedly heading into a multi-year global recession that will cripple an already heavily struggling academic job market. It's impossible to say precisely what things will look like in 3 or 5 years, of course, but even at this early stage, it's certain that it's going to be bad, very bad. So everyone facing a decision should be asking programs how they plan to support and meet student concerns, even if (justifiably) no one will likely have a plan yet.

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